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Rent suspensions, deferrals and reductions on industry agenda as arrears crisis looms

first_imgHome » News » COVID-19 news » Rent suspensions, deferrals and reductions on industry agenda as arrears crisis looms previous nextCOVID-19 newsRent suspensions, deferrals and reductions on industry agenda as arrears crisis loomsHigh profile organisations offer new guidance to landlords and tenants in an attempt to slow the rent arrears train coming down the track.Nigel Lewis3rd July 202001,238 Views It’s not often that major players within the property industry come together to back a single issue, but the enormous rent arrears backlog likely to slam into the sector as the pandemic squeezes the economy has done just that.ARLA Propertymark, the Chartered Institute of Housing, MyDeposits, the Tenancy Deposit Scheme, the Property Redress Scheme and the National Residential Landlords Association have jointly agreed guidance that advises landlords and tenants how to negotiate including ways to agree rent deferrals, reductions and suspensions.This might sound like pretty sensible advice, but the organisations are sticking their collective necks out – remember not all letting agents and landlords are ready to help out renters in this way and some still prefer to urge tenants to pay their rent rather than offer concessions.The joint advice is part of guidance that has been pulled together to help both sides work together to address arrears resulting from the Covid downturn.BenefitsThe includes the need for both parties to flag up any problems that might be arising early on, and how to help tenants apply for benefits where needed, and work out realistic repayment budgets.In a joint statement, the organisations say: “COVID-19 has posed significant challenges for both tenants and landlords.“As a group we are committed to doing everything possible to sustain tenancies both through and beyond this period of crisis.“The guidance being launched today has an important role to play in achieving this and we encourage all tenants and landlords to work through it together in a spirit of positive co-operation.”NRLA Chartered Institute of Housing MYDEPOSITS PRS rent arrears ARLA Propertymark TDS July 3, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

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Netherlands: Damen Rolls out Second Multi-Mission Moroccan Frigate

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Netherlands: Damen Rolls out Second Multi-Mission Moroccan Frigate View post tag: Moroccan View post tag: Damen Share this article At Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding in Vlissingen, on February 2, the second Multi-Mission Frigate under construction for the Royal Moroccan Navy, was rolled out of the assembly hall.The 98 metre long ship has been constructed entirely on land at the DSNS yard at Vlissingen-East and is now ready, on schedule, to be completed at the Vlissingen-City shipyard.Heavy Lifting and Transport company Mammoet Europe B.V., moved the 1700 ton vessel from the assembly hall to the pontoon after which the ship was launched.The frigate was then be towed by tug boats to Vlissingen-City where it will be completed.At this moment three Moroccan frigates are under construction at the DSNS yard in Vlissingen.The first frigate of 105 metre was successfully launched in July 2010. The third frigate for the Royal Moroccan Navy, also 98 metres long, is planned to be launched at the end of this year. View post tag: Second View post tag: Frigate Netherlands: Damen Rolls out Second Multi-Mission Moroccan Frigate Equipment & technology View post tag: Naval View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Navy View post tag: Netherlands [mappress]Source: Damen,March 4, 2011; View post tag: Rolls March 4, 2011 View post tag: Multi-Missionlast_img read more

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Art Education – University Supervisor

first_imgDoes this position require a pre-placement medicalassessment?No Normal work days Position NumberJ00001 University supervisors should have academic backgrounds andexperience in the field of education and have taught successfullyat the levels they supervise. We are seeking supervisors with priorteaching experience in the areas of K-12 Art. CampusMonroe Park Campus Open Until FilledYes At VCU, we Make it Real through learning, research, creativity,service and discovery — the hallmarks of the VCU experience. Apremier, urban, public research university nationally recognized asone of the best employers for diversity, VCU is a great place towork. It’s a place of opportunity, where your success is supportedand your career can thrive. VCU offers employees a generous leavepackage, career paths for advancement, competitive pay, and anopportunity to do mission-driven work. Resource CriticalYes Quick Linkhttps://www.vcujobs.com/postings/91594 Additional Information Normal work hours Job Open Date07/17/2019 Hours/Week Minimum of a Master’s degree in Art Education and a minimum of 5years recent experience in K-12 Art-Valid Virginia teaching certificate-Awareness and comprehension of current teaching strategies-Experience observing and evaluating teaching performance-Ability to work with the public in pleasant, cooperative,collaborative manner-Ability to travel to multiple school settings within targetarea-Demonstrate strong commitment to working with multiculturalpopulations fbr Job CategoryAdjunct – Teaching Preferred Qualifications Posting Details Does this position provide patient or clinical services to theVCU Health System?No Description of the Job Is any portion of this position grant-funded?No Organizational Overview The University Supervisor is an adjunct faculty member in theSchool of the Arts, Department of Art Education. The supervisorserves as the liaison between the Dept. of Art Education and theK-12 School where teacher candidates are assigned for theirstudent-teaching placements. It is the University Supervisor’sresponsibility to instruct and supervise teacher candidates duringtheir practical clinical work in an appropriate academicenvironment and provide a written evaluation of the studentteachers, visit them at their school placement sites, and conferwith the cooperating teacher(s). The essential function of theuniversity supervisor is to provide guidance for the teachercandidates in their development of teaching competency and to giveassistance to the cooperating teacher. Required Qualifications Remove from posting on or before Sensitive PositionNo Position TypeAdjunct – Teaching Recruitment PoolAll Applicants Special Instructions to Applicants Job Code/Title Working TitleArt Education – University Supervisor DepartmentArt Education Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*).Optional & Required DocumentsRequired DocumentsCurriculum Vitae (CV)Optional Documents Anticipated Hiring RangeCommensurate with experiencelast_img read more

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Labor leader: State of Indiana unions is strong

first_img Pinterest Google+ WhatsApp Labor leader: State of Indiana unions is strong Facebook By Jon Zimney – September 10, 2020 2 248 Twitter Facebook Pinterest (95.3 MNC) There is reason to feel optimistic if you are a member of a union in Indiana, according to one Indiana labor leader.Brett Voorhies, president of AFL-CIO Indiana, tells Inside Indiana Business the U.S.-Mexico-Canada-Agreement (USMCA) can lead to more Hoosier jobs.“I think the President has us heading in the right direction. NAFTA was certainly a job-killer for most all the way up until today. But I think this agreement has a long way to go. There are still a lot of things to be worked out, but it’s certainly headed in the right direction on bringing more manufacturing here (Indiana) and preventing it from going overseas,” said Voorhies in an interview with the President of Inside Indiana Business Gerry Dick.In that interview, Voorhies discussed the state of labor across Indiana.“I’d say organized labor is on the rise. We’ve done really well here in Indiana. Labor unions have a 64% approval rating, which is the highest in 50 years. It’s been the same way in Indiana. Due to the pandemic, we’ve been getting phone calls left and right from people who want to join a union to have some type of protection and have more of a voice,” said Voorhies.Voorhies also says another bright spot for labor is construction. He says it has remained steady despite the pandemic.“It’s gotten to the point to where some of the trades can’t get enough apprentices to come in and work,” said Voorhies.Data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics shows the number of workers represented by unions in Indiana declined for the third straight year in 2019, to 296,000, compared to 335,000 just five years earlier. Twitter IndianaLocalNews WhatsApp Google+ Previous articleFire Departments plan annual bell ringing event for 9-11Next articlePurdue University leaders warn vaping is linked to campus coronavirus cases Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney.last_img read more

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Proper Cornish factory delayed

first_imgProper Cornish’s new £4m factory in Bodmin has been “slightly delayed” from its earmarked June opening.The 73,000sq ft facility will produce more than 50,000 hand-crimped pasties a day as well as other products from more than 70 recipes.Some elements of the factory are already up and running and by the time it officially opens it will have the capacity to produce 575,000 units a day. The company supplies to wholesale, retail, private label and foodservice customers.Proper Cornish will “keep hold” of its old factory for “continuity”. Mark Muncey, marketing director, said: “One factory will be used for working on efficiencies and one to work on niche products.” Essentially, the old factory will become a test site for NPD.The company also has “a big focus on universities” and will be repeating its Fresher’s Week campaign this September, with more details to come.Proper Cornish has launched a raft of new products this year including a four-strong range of mini pies: steak and ale; chicken, bacon and leek; asparagus and mushroom; and sausage pie. The pies are made in a star shape to make them easier to eat on the go, as they are easily held and the shape restricts the filling from falling out.Other recent launches that are “doing well” are a chorizo sausage roll and a Philly cheesesteak slice.last_img read more

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Watch moe. Drop Dozens Of Inflatable Bears On Their Fans At Saranac Brewery

first_imgmoe. wrapped up a successful two-night run at the Saranac Brewery last night, playing to a local crowd at the beloved Utica, NY venue. After a couple weeks off of the road, the energy during moe.’s two night run was through the roof, and culminated in a wild celebration for last night’s performance.The band started the run by playing some fun covers, including a bust-out of Grateful Dead’s “The Other One” in the middle of their original “Silver Sun.” You can watch that here. Night two saw the group mostly sticking to originals (with the exception of House of Pain’s “Jump Around,” led by percussionist Jim Loughlin), opening with “Seat Of My Pants” and rocking out classics like “Spine Of A Dog,” “Not Coming Down,” “Wormwood,” and more. They ended set one with “McBain,” and you can watch a clip of the jam below.After a great “Happy Hour Hero” opened set two, the band broke into their classic “Bearsong.” This version saw the band literally dump dozens of inflatable bears onto the crowd, only fueling the fires of a great jam session. Watch as it all goes down below!After “Jump Around,” the band worked in classics like “Tailspin,” “Opium,” and “lylelovitt.” to keep the set rocking. After a foray into “Downward Facing Dog,” the band capped the set with a version of “32 Things.” Finally, it was “Buster” that concluded the night, keeping the jams alive through one of moe.’s most beloved songs!Check out the full setlist from Saranac below, courtesy of the band.Setlist: moe. at Saranac Brewery, Utica, NY – 7/30/16I: Seat Of My Pants, Big World > Ricky Marten > Spine Of A Dog > Not Coming Down > Wormwood > Okayalright, McBainII: Happy Hour Hero, Bearsong > Jump Around > Tailspin, Opium > lylelovitt., Downward Facing Dog > 32 ThingsEncore: Busterlast_img read more

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Yonder Mountain String Band Announces Ween Tribute For Halloween Show

first_imgWell this should be a fun Halloween! Yonder Mountain String Band is set to perform at the House Of Blues in Chicago, IL on October 29th, and they’ve just announced a fun theme for the performance.Yonder has always maintained elements of punk and rock in their music, and they’ll rely on those influences when they play songs from the classic Ween album 12 Golden Country Greats for Halloween. Tracks like “Piss Up A Rope,” “Japanese Cowboy” and more are all on the table for what is sure to be a great show!Tickets and more information can be found here.last_img

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Watch Joe Rogan & Actor Andrew Santino Talk Dead & Co, John Mayer On ‘The Joe Rogan Experience’

first_imgIn a new episode of The Joe Rogan Experience, host, comedian, and actor Joe Rogan invited the star of Showtime’s I’m Dying Up Here, actor Andrew Santino, to join him for a three-hour-long conversation on a whole slew of topics. During the episode, which was released at the end of July, the conversation veers to Dead & Company, with the two discussing the Grateful Dead-inspired reformation and John Mayer‘s role in the band.About two-thirds of the way through the show (around the two-hour–18-minute mark), after discussing Cat Stevens, Rogan brings up that musicians can embark on “comeback tours” in a way that standup comedians cannot, revisiting and reperforming all their “old hits” to eager audiences. After talking about older acts’ ability to continue to tour, like The Beach Boys, who recently announced a summer tour in May, Santino offers up Dead & Company as an example of a band “that reconvenes with new members.”Rogan seems surprised to find out that John Mayer currently collaborates with members of the Grateful Dead: “John Mayer? The John Mayer handsome guy who hangs out with Dave Chappelle?” Rogan asks, later exclaiming “Get the fuck out!” when Santino confirms that Mayer tours and sings with Dead & Company and that “Deadheads love it.”Santino also offers that he has friends who love the Grateful Dead, relaying their thoughts on the project. He notes, “I got a couple friends who are Deadheads. I never was into the Dead, but they were skeptics at the beginning, they’re in fucking love with [Mayer]. ‘He does it right, man. He pays homage the right way; he’s a fucking god.’ It’s fucking insane. John Mayer, ‘Your Body Is A Wonderland’, he’s playing Dead songs.”In response, after bursting out laughing, Rogan adds, “The world can’t get any more absurd.”You can watch episode 1148 of The Joe Rogan Experience below, with Joe Rogan and Andrew Santino talking Dead & Company at 2:18:45.[Video: PowerfulJRE][H/T JamBase via r/GratefulDead]last_img read more

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What are the “Hard Problems” in the social sciences?

first_imgJust over a century ago, one of the world’s leading mathematicians posed this question to a number of his colleagues:What are the most important unsolved questions in mathematics?The answers – which David Hilbert then ranked in what he believed to be their order of importance – produced a list of 23 mathematical problems that shaped mathematics for 100 years.This past Saturday, Stephen Kosslyn, dean of Harvard’s Division of Social Science, posed a Hilbert-like challenge to a diverse group of social scientists he had spent two years gathering:What, he asked, are the great unanswered questions in the social sciences?Hilbert selected and ranked the final problems himself, but Kosslyn, the John Lindsley Professor of Psychology in Memory of William James, is using technology to revolutionize, and democratize, the process. Selecting the important issues in the field isn’t just his job – it’s everyone’s.And while Hilbert used a conference to present his list of problems, Kosslyn convened last Saturday’s Hard Problems in Social Science Symposium in Harvard’s Northwest Science Building to provide a setting in which his invited colleagues could suggest what are being termed the “hard problems” in the social sciences.Rather than being a concluding summit, “this is actually a kick-off event,” Kosslyn explained in an interview. “What we’re trying to do is collect as many problems as we can and then have people vote on them in terms of two dimensions: that is, what’s most difficult and what’s most important, which may not be the same.Over the next two months, the University’s Division of Social Science will collect online submissions at Hard Problems web site and at a Hard Problems Facebook page. Anyone, anywhere, regardless of their field of expertise, is encouraged to submit questions for consideration until May 31.The conference and list were the brainchild of Harvard College graduate Nick Nash ’00, a joint chemistry and physics concentrator who has been thinking for some time about what he perceives as the need to improve awareness and understanding of the social sciences. “These are the sciences of our shared humanity,” he told a reporter. “But these sciences are much more in their infancy relative to physics or chemistry.”“Because the social sciences are ultimately about people, we felt very strong that this be a democratic process and global process,” said Nash, who proposed the idea of creating a “Hilbert’s Questions” list for the social sciences and the conference, to Kosslyn. “We really want people around the world to view these videos, read the transcripts, and then vote on what they think is important,” said Nash, a member of the Indira Foundation, the charitable foundation that sponsored the symposium,. “and even add more questions.”Saturday’s symposium, broadcast live via the Internet, featured 12 speakers, including, among others, experts in philosophy, medicine, history, political science, psychology, and economics from the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Chicago, the University of California, San Diego, Oxford University, New York University, and Harvard. In addition, there were about 100 attendees of diverse backgrounds, ranging from Harvard undergrads to Ridley Pledger, the grandfather of a member of Harvard’s women’s softball team.Pledger, who was visiting from Friendswood, Texas, said he decided to attend the symposium because he wants to learn more about economic issues. Pledger said that although he was trained as a chemical engineer, he doesn’t feel out of place among social scientists because “money is basic to everybody. It doesn’t matter how you earn it. It’s what happens to it, or where is the money going to come from, that’s important.”The questions posed by the speakers during their allotted 15-minute presentations ranged from why gender differences in economic outcomes persist, posited by Claudia Goldin, Henry Lee Professor of Economics at Harvard and director of the Development of the American Economy Program at the National Bureau of Economic Research, to how to get people to make positive changes in their health behaviors, asked by Emily Oster, assistant professor of economics at the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago, to how to close the achievement gap, which Roland G. Fryer called the new problem of the 21st century. “The problem of the 21st century is no longer a problem of the color line, the problem of the 21st century is how do we get eighth-graders to achieve at the same level, across the country, regardless of their race?” said Fryer, Robert M. Beren Professor of Economics at Harvard, director of Harvard’s Educational Innovation Laboratory, and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research.Ann Swidler, a sociology professor at the University of California, Berkeley, spoke about nation building and what creates effective and resilient institutions. She presented questions as well as possible solutions. “One of the crises in contemporary American life is a kind of massive disinvestment from our basic institutions, especially our political institutions,” Swidler said during her presentation. “You can think of this in terms of particular political interests, and you can think of it in terms of the larger problem of whether the willingness to have effective, powerful institutions that can address collective problems exists at all.”Swidler suggested that status and a strong cultural knowledge of a particular institution might contribute to the institution’s strength. But like the other speakers, Swindler focused more on concisely framing her “hard problem.” “It’s the questions, not the answers, I have right now that matter,” she said.At the completion of the presentations, attendees were given a chance to question the speakers. “Is it, in a sense, a false question to talk about hard questions in the soft sciences?” asked audience member Hans Bakker, professor of sociology and anthropology at the University of Guelph, in Ontario.“I don’t think that these are the soft sciences. If they’re so soft then why don’t we have the answers?” James Fowler, an associate professor of political science at the University of California, San Diego, responded.“It’s interesting because that question is about language really,” Fowler continued. “It would be easier if we did speak the same language, but I think the problems that we face now are not going to be within [disciplines]. … They’re going to be between disciplinary problems. This is part of the problem that we’re all expressing, that we’re going to have to reach out and figure out common signs that we can use to talk to one another,” Fowler concluded.During one of the coffee breaks, presenter Gary King, Harvard’s Albert J. Weatherhead III University Professor based in the Department of Government, and director of Harvard’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science, reflected on the symposium’s comparison with the Hilbert questions. “A lot of the mathematical [Hilbert] problems, it was later proven, can never be answered. So surely some of these problems cannot be answered, but it’s not really different,” King said.The so-called soft sciences have become progressively “harder” over the years, King said, especially in their use of data collection and analysis. The computer revolution – including the development of online social networking – will further those developments, he said. He went on to say that there is a need to develop much more infrastructure in the social sciences, allowing researchers to share information as they would in a wet lab setting.If comments from both the presenters and audience are any indication, one of the hard problems will inevitably be creating definitions within social science studies, and even defining the field itself. “One of the most interesting parts of this conference was the very first words that the moderator (Kosslyn) said. He said, ‘What is social science? What is a social science problem? What is a solution?’” said Harvard Class of 1956 economics alumnae Ruth Bruening. “I think those are the real questions,” she said.Kosslyn perhaps summed the day up best in his response to one of the final questions asked: What do the questions about hard problems suggest about the answers? Kosslyn judged that depending on what question you ask, different things count as answers. “So getting the questions straight, in this case the problems, is an absolutely necessary first step to forward a position to even start thinking about the solutions,” Kosslyn said.King agreed that the questions are vital. “Sometimes just listing the big problems is enough to inspire somebody to come up with a good solution, or a way around something, or a way to redefine the question so that you can get past it,” King said. He reasoned that the answers to these particular problems would undoubtedly affect everyday people.As the attendees departed, Jennifer Shepherd, the special initiatives program manager in the Division of Social Sciences, looked into a cardboard box containing the “hard problems” submissions from the day. Nash talked to the final attendees and speakers heading out. He loosened a red tie with multiple Harvard crests embroidered on it, looking tired, but pleased.The panelists were a phenomenal group, and the attendees were thoughtful and willing to take a stand, Nash said, adding that he’s ready for the voting to begin. He’s also ready looking forward to seeing what impact the symposium will have on the field.Once a core list of questions is collected from across the globe, the conference presenters will be charged with selecting and ranking the most important issues in social sciences. Each panelist was selected by Kosslyn for his or her expertise and to represent different fields, perspectives, and backgrounds.Hilbert felt that unsolved questions were “the hallmark of a discipline with vitality,” Nash said. “This exercise today is an exercise in the vitality of social sciences. Knowing what the mountains are encourages climbers,” he added. “There’s nothing more inspiring for a first-year grad student than knowing that no one’s climbed Everest.”last_img read more

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Reconnecting academic support services

first_imgAfter five years of gathering input from students, faculty, and staff, after lengthy planning, and after careful thinking about the best way to support undergraduates, the Bureau of Study Counsel (BSC) will return to Harvard College oversight starting July 1.According to Dean of Undergraduate Education Jay Harris, the transition offers multiple opportunities to enhance the strong academic support currently provided at Harvard.“To support our students, we need an academic learning center that can help them engage fully in the educational opportunities of Harvard College,” said Harris. “The transition of the bureau back to College oversight is the first step in renewing the bureau’s role as the College’s primary learning center.”The BSC, which has been part of Harvard University Health Services (HUHS) for the past 11 years, was created by faculty vote in 1947 and long has been a central component of the learning and academic support system at Harvard. Students arrive at the College from widely diverse academic, social, and cultural contexts; once here, they pursue a vast array of interests and ambitions. Academic support services are designed to help students develop the capacity to engage in the intellectual, social, and personal transformation that represents the essence of a liberal arts and sciences education at Harvard College.In keeping with the College’s efforts to foster these transformative educational experiences, Ann Gaylin was hired in August 2014 as associate dean of undergraduate education for academic support in the Office of Undergraduate Education (OUE). For seven months, Gaylin has been working to align and integrate Harvard’s academic and student support services to enable all students to thrive intellectually at the College, with the first step being the shift of the BSC’s administrative oversight back to the College.“The mission of the College starts with intellectual transformation. It forms the bedrock of the broader transformation that is the goal of a liberal arts education at Harvard,” said Gaylin. “By enhancing our support for students’ intellectual transformation — and their ability to reflect on and understand their own learning as individuals and as members of our community — we hope to foster the conditions for social and personal transformation as well.”Just as the shift in oversight of the BSC and the resulting renewed emphasis on academic support enables the BSC to expand and enhance learning support services, it also allows its professional staff to consult more easily with other individuals who help students in their academic and personal development at Harvard, including deans, faculty members, advisers, and administrators. More generally, the shift will facilitate enhanced collaboration with other offices charged with supporting students — especially the Accessible Education Office — and better sharing of aggregate data to understand student trends and identify academic support needs.The transition of the BSC also places it under the privacy standards of an educational environment, instead of the confidentiality standards of a health care environment under which it has functioned for the last 11 years. In addition, clinical licensure will no longer be a prerequisite for joining the BSC professional staff, allowing the bureau to further expand its range of expertise and to continue to evolve as students’ needs evolve. The BSC will continue to work closely with HUHS Counseling and Mental Health Services (CAMHS) to ensure that students with mental health concerns are appropriately referred to CAMHS resources.“The BSC has always been a valuable part of the academic support we provide to students here at Harvard,” said Director of Harvard University Health Services Paul Barreira. “Over the years as the student population has changed, the College needed to expand these services, and the BSC transition is an important step in this process. At HUHS, we look forward to continuing to work closely with the BSC to provide the best services and resources possible to all Harvard students.”During this transition period, the BSC plans to enhance and extend its already robust array of services, including workshops and one-on-one conversations about the challenges students face, such as time management, procrastination, reading, and exam preparation, as well as more reflective programs about intellectual engagement and resilience. The BSC is already working to create an online version of the Reading Course (expected publication this fall), which will allow students to fit the course into their busy schedules, and to work at their own pace. In response to student feedback about tutoring, the bureau plans to enhance the capacity and quality of its peer tutoring and will further develop its partnership with the Accessible Education Office to ensure that students with disabilities continue to thrive in Harvard’s rigorous educational environmentThe bureau’s shift in oversight will be gradual, with full integration into the College’s administrative structures anticipated in early fiscal 2016. The BSC will continue to serve students at its current physical location at 5 Linden St.last_img read more

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