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Quick fix

first_imgIf you are an HR director and would like to share yourtraining experience or review a training course, e-mail: [email protected] So, while these intensive and highly interactive sessionsaren’t ideal for those who prefer more reflective learning, and, rightly, donot pretend to be a substitute for one-to-one coaching, they do provide avaluable stimulus and very practical learning in a time-efficient and popularway. The Mind Gym is such a simple concept it is extraordinary noone thought of it sooner. What it does, is deliver 90-minute, face-to-facemini-workshops on a wide range of leadership and management developmentsubjects (“life skills”) supported by weekly e-mails. Each session ison a different subject and there are over 60 to choose from. Quick fixOn 1 May 2001 in Personnel Today In our time-poor world, where a day (or, heaven forbid, aweek) away from the office seems all but career suicide to many high-flyingexecutives, the idea of a 90-minute learning “injection” is deeplyseductive. Add to this, the chance to choose from such intriguing titles as”Zoom learning”, “2+2=Green” and “The beautifulquestion”, or to brush up on practical skills such as “Rememberingwhats is name”, “Building rapport” and “Getting thingsdone”, and you sense that this is no normal training offer. You can tell how many teams in the bank have attended andenjoyed this workout from conversations overheard in the corridors –”You’re a Helen”, “Naresh is a Graham, for sure”. Thelasting benefit, however, is that people are learning to understand each othermore and evaluate each other less – a great gain for teamwork. Comments are closed. Next, I decided to attend “Zoom learning”.”At the end of the workout you will have discovered techniques to changeyour learning lens from wide-angle to microscopic”, it claims on therelevant Web page. It also explains, “too much helicopter vision and practicalconsiderations are forgotten, but get stuck in the cornflakes and there is adanger of high activity with minimal, or the wrong, impact”. It makessense, but could The Mind Gym really help me control my “learningaperture”? After a few relevant warm-up exercises we were split intoteams of four and given a case study. Disturbed from a well-earned break on theisland of Mauritius, my team was instructed by company boss Donald H Laser IIto find out what was happening at Arkwright Photocopy, an ailing subsidiarywhose leadership team he had fired yesterday. Can you really hone skills with a single 90-minute workout?Antonia Cowdry, VP organisational development at Deutsche Bank, put The MindGym through its paces We have found The Mind Gym to be a powerful tool, despite orperhaps because of the simplicity of the concept, and it is helping us buildskills and develop culture across Deutsche Bank. Employees in the UK were thefirst to try the workouts, and they are now proving a hit with Deutsche Bank’sGerman graduates as well. The initial successes were with team leaders as partof ongoing development and team building, but we are likely to incorporateworkouts into our induction programmes and other courses right across thebusiness. Related posts:No related photos.center_img I consulted my colleagues and we agreed to give The Mind Gyma trial. The first “workout” we chose was “Your impact onothers”. Within moments, the group of 15 HR specialists who had assembledin a meeting room one Thursday lunchtime were moving around, asking each otherquestions and debating how different people perceive the same behaviour. Usingimaginary characters by the names of Roger, Bridget, Graham and Helen, The MindGym coach quickly had us agreeing on the faults and strengths of varyingpersonality types. He went on to help us discover which characters we each tendto be like (a cross between Roger and Bridget in my case) and therefore what wecan do to increase our impact on the other people we work with.  The psychological backing may be over 20 years old, but theworkshop is thoroughly modern with plenty of exercises, illustrations,break-out groups and laughter. It is amazing how much can be packed into anhour and a half. For further details on The Mind Gym range of workouts, see www.themindgym.com or call +44 (0) 207376 0626. Further information I don’t claim that I can now turn around an ailing businessin an hour. However, I do now consciously think about whether I am looking at aproblem in “floodlight” or “spotlight” mode and when tomove between the two. Previous Article Next Article Another valuable innovation from The Mind Gym is thee-prompt. These are short e-mails sent to all participants once a week for amonth after the workshop. The content varies from short quizzes (match the nineinfluencing styles to nine song titles, for example ‘Big Boss Man’ with‘Pressure’), cartoons and brief exercises, to simple diagnostics andno-nonsense reminders. None of them takes more than five minutes to completeand they are a simple way to help sustain learning. There is also an opt-outfor those who feel that they receive quite enough e-mails already. First, we were encouraged to paint as much of the bigpicture as we could with the basic information we had, and we then had todecide where to “zoom” for more detail by commissioning a report fromany two of the five divisions. My team decided on sales and marketing andcustomer service. Armed with this extra information, we zoomed back out to”floodlight” and revised our view of the main issues. We were aboutto share our conclusions with the rest of the group when we were given anotherchance to zoom in for more detail – there was an e-mail from each departmentand we were again allowed to read any two. Whether it was luck or a consequenceof effective zooming, we picked ones that provided vital information andrevised our recommendations accordingly. The 90-minute concept is a sure-fire winner in the demandingworld of investment banking. While we may develop our own workouts for some ofthe more specialised areas, for leadership and general management skills TheMind Gym will be hard to beat, with its high-impact workshops and lively,knowledgeable coaches who deliver what they promise. Deutsche Bank has run a wide range of workouts, including”Body language”, “Conflict handling”, “Speed of soundreading” and “Creativity for logical thinkers”. The Mind Gym’sclaim that over 90% of participants say they will apply what they have learntis consistent with our participant feedback.last_img read more

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GDEB gets $22.2 bn contract for Virginia-class submarines

first_img View post tag: GDEB View post tag: submarine View post tag: Virginia-Class View post tag: US Navy The US Navy has awarded General Dynamics Electric Boat a contract valued at $22.2 billion for the construction of nine new Virginia-class submarines.The contract also includes the option of a tenth ship to be built within the contract time frame, bringing the total potential contract value to approximately $24.1 billion.Construction on Block V ships will begin this year, with deliveries scheduled from 2025 through 2029.“Our submarine force is fundamental to the power and reach of our integrated naval force,” acting Secretary of the US Navy Thomas B. Modly said.As explained, the multi-year ‘Block V’ contract enables Electric Boat as prime contractor, along with its teammate, Newport News Shipbuilding, to deliver Virginia-class fast-attack submarines with advanced capabilities and expanded capacity to the navy.“Increasing the cadence of our production from one per year to two, coupled with the start of full production of the Columbia-class ballistic missile submarine, represents a generational increase in submarine production for our nation,” Kevin M. Graney, President, General Dynamics Electric Boat, said.Eight of the ships produced for Block V will include the Virginia Payload Module (VPM), which Electric Boat will build at a recently-constructed facility at Quonset Point, Rhode Island. The VPM will comprise four additional large-diameter payload tubes located amidships, increasing the fixed strike capacity of the ship by more than 230 percent. VPM, which was designed by Electric Boat, will enable enhanced use of Special Operating Forces and allow the US Navy to bring aboard additional weapons, sensors and other special payloads.Electric Boat and Newport News Shipbuilding have already delivered eighteen Virginia-class submarines to the US Navy and all ten Block IV submarines are currently under construction.Virginia-class submarines displace 7,800 tons, with a hull length of 377 feet and a diameter of 34 feet. With VPM, the submarines will displace 10,200 tons and have a length of 460 feet. They are capable of speeds in excess of 25 knots and can dive to a depth greater than 800 feet, while carrying Mark 48 advanced capability torpedoes, Tomahawk land-attack missiles and unmanned underwater vehicles. Photo: Illustration. Photo: US Navy/General Dynamics Electric Boat Share this articlelast_img read more

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Press release: Imam who sexually abused student has sentence increased

first_imgAn imam who sexually assaulted a young child over a period of 7 years had his sentence increased today after it was referred to the Court of Appeal by the Solicitor General, Robert Buckland QC MP, under the Unduly Lenient Sentence scheme.Mohammed Ghani, 65, was a respected imam in the local community who used professional visits to the victim’s home as an opportunity to carry out a campaign of sexual abuse. This resulted in lasting emotional repercussions for the victim.Ghani was sentenced at Leeds Crown Court in August, where he was given 2 years imprisonment. Today, after the Solicitor General’s referral, the Court of Appeal increased his sentence to 5 years imprisonment.Speaking after the hearing, the Solicitor General said:“Ghani abused his position of authority and subjected a vulnerable child to a campaign of sexual assaults. I hope that the Court of Appeal’s decision today brings the victim and their family some comfort.”last_img read more

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Designing a stronger safety net

first_imgTaube Weiner has had no problems making the most of retirement. From learning Hebrew and celebrating an adult bat mitzvah to picking up consulting work as a career counselor, Weiner has embraced her newfound freedom since retiring from Harvard in 2009 at 74.But that doesn’t mean she didn’t hit a few bumps along the way.“You think you’re prepared,” Weiner said. “Then the roof falls in, so to speak.” For Weiner, that unexpected avalanche came in the form of a flooded home and $4,000 worth of dental work, a cost that could have been avoided had she signed up for the retiree dental plan that the University offers.Weiner was hardly alone in navigating the uncertain path to retirement. Last year, 121 Harvard employees with at least 10 years of service retired, and hundreds more at the University are heading down the same road. But experts have found not many of them are putting in the long-term planning required for a stable financial future.According to a study of people age 50 to 70 released last month by Miami University and the MetLife Mature Market Institute, working Americans in that age bracket spent just 15 hours over the past six months planning for retirement. Only a fifth of those surveyed felt very confident they could provide for themselves or a spouse past the age of 85.With those numbers in mind, the Harvard Benefits Office is resurrecting its popular financial planning seminar, “Transitioning to Retirement: A Pre-Retirement Planning Program.” The first four sessions, the first of which is March 31, have filled up already, and registration for additional sessions for the fall will be available soon, said Melanie Aska, the seminar’s coordinator. (Dates and registration information can be found online.)“We want to demystify the benefits of retirement,” said Aska, senior consultant for benefits education and communications. “We’re trying to take away some of the anxiety people may feel when they transition from an active work life, with a paycheck and benefits.”Weiner was relatively well prepared for the financial realities of retirement. Her job at Harvard Medical School as a career consultant at the Center for Workplace Learning and Performance entailed giving other employees advice on that very topic. But after leaving the University, she said, she found it hard to stick to a budget.“At first, I found myself running around and spending money, looking for things to do,” said Weiner, who good-naturedly describes herself as lacking a “financial head.” “I was having a wonderful time, but I had to sit back and say, ‘Wait a minute, the money’s going out, but it’s not coming in.’ ”The pre-retirement seminar, which is open to employees who are one to five years from retirement as well as their spouses and partners, aims to lay out the various ways the money does still “come in” and help participants make the most of those often-confusing funds. The daylong sessions will cover Harvard-sponsored retirement and health benefits, estate planning, long-term care insurance, Social Security, Medicare, and investing for retirement. Representatives from financial services companies (TIAA-CREF, Fidelity, or Vanguard), the Social Security Administration, the Harvard University Retirees Association (HURA), and the Harvard University Employee Credit Union will be on hand to present and answer questions.The session will fill a need for information in the retiree community, said Malcolm Hamilton, president of HURA, which has 1,200 members out of roughly 3,200 living retirees.“People have been asking us questions that should have been answered before they retired,” he said. By the time an employee has retired, he added, some answers may not be of much use. “If you discover a few years before you retire that you haven’t been too smart about your retirement funds, then that’s too late.”In the years since the recession began, people have been more cautious about their decision to retire, Hamilton said, which could contribute to high interest in the planning seminars.“There’s a mythology that no one can afford to retire anymore, and that’s just not true,” Hamilton said. “But a little fear and trembling isn’t a bad thing. People ought to think about what their needs are going to be, because they are living longer and they’re living healthier.”But as any recent retiree will tell you, financial planning for retirement is just the beginning. The hard part is figuring out what to do after the morning commutes and busy workweeks disappear.With that in mind, Harvard’s Center for Workplace Development is piloting a five-week discussion group for employees nearing retirement called “Changing Lanes” that will explore ways to make the most of one’s retired years, from part-time work to volunteer opportunities to travel and leisure time. The program will only be open to those who have completed the financial planning workshop.“Once people get their financial ducks in order, they’ll be ready to focus on the lifestyle issues,” Aska said.last_img read more

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Fighting to end polio in Syria

first_imgAfter helping bring international attention to an emerging polio epidemic in Syria, Annie Sparrow, M.P.H. ’04, has been working for the past year to help the country’s medical workers learn to diagnose and treat the disease. An Australian-born physician and professor of global health at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York, Sparrow wrote a series of blog posts for The New York Review of Books in late 2013 raising alarm about the epidemic — and a cover-up by Syrian president Bashar al-Assad’s regime — and calling for the United Nations and international aid agencies to take action. The widely read stories helped create a push to launch a vaccination program in Syria that has now reached approximately 1.4 million children.Former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan said in a Vogue magazine profile posted January 29, 2015, “Dr. Annie Sparrow is a passionate and dedicated professional who is unafraid to speak her mind. She rightly points out that health care is the first casualty of war.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

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16-Year-Old Girl Dies After Falling Off Ledge In Zoar Valley

first_imgStock Image.OTTO – Officials with the Cattaraugus County Sheriff’s Office say a 16-year-old girl died after falling off a ledge in Zoar Valley.First responders were called to the scene around 6 p.m. on Saturday.Deputies say the girl sustained facial injuries in the fall.Medical crews from the Otto, Eden and Gowanda Fire Department assisted law enforcement at the scene. Deputies say the investigation into the incident is still ongoing.The Erie County Sheriff, New York State Police, New York Forest Rangers and New York Environmental Police were also on scene.No further information about the incident was released. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img

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Lawmakers to GAO: Work with credit unions on Reg D study

first_img 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, and Rep. Robert Pittenger, R-N.C., urged the Government Accountability Office to conduct a study on the impact of Regulation D’s limit on transfers from savings accounts and that the GAO consult with credit unions and community banks on the issue.A similar study was called for under the House-passed “Regulation D Study Act,” H.R. 3240. While cleared unanimously by the House, the bill failed to get action in the Senate. Hensarling and Pittenger want the GAO to study the issue anyway.“Federal Reserve Regulation D limits consumers to six transfers per month from their savings account to any other accounts. This regulation is over 30 years old and has not been significantly revised since it was first implemented,” Hensarling and Pittenger wrote.Hensarling and Pittenger requested the study to examine the history of the monthly transfer limit and what benefits might arise from increasing it. H.R. 3240, which was passed by the House this month, would require a study of the impact of the requirements on depository institutions, consumers and monetary policy. Prior to the bill’s passage, sponsors Pittenger, and Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., both cited NAFCU’s support of the measure in their remarks before the full House. continue reading »last_img read more

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Wright-Patt straps onto smartwatch market

first_imgby: Tina OremWright-Patt Credit Union’s 300,000 members can now be among the first in the U.S. to be able to check their account balances with just a flick of an Android Wear smartwatch, thanks to a new app released Thursday.The smartwatch app automatically syncs to users’ Android Wear devices after they upgrade to the updated Wright-Patt Credit Union mobile app. Using their voices, users can get account balances without logging in on their mobile phones, the credit union said in an announcement. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img

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Brett Culp: Honor everyday heroes

first_img 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Brett Culp believes in the power of video and film to inspire and empower.“As I started to fall in love with filmmaking and improved as a storyteller, I realized my gift was to find light in dark spaces—to see the power and the goodness in people and in their life stories even when they could not see it for themselves,” he says.Culp is the personal cinematographer for Hollywood stars, music icons, and famous athletes. His 2013 documentary, “Legends of the Knight,” which tells true stories of people who become real-life heroes through their love of the comic book character Batman, is a prime example of that gift.One of those heroes is Lenny Robinson, who became internet famous for getting pulled over by the police while driving down an interstate in Baltimore in a replica of the Batmobile while wearing a full Batman costume.“There is this video from the dash cam of the police car where you can hear the police officers talking, where you see Batman get pulled over by the police, and it is hilarious,” Culp says.last_img read more

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‘I was at 702 calls’: Locals struggle to file for unemployment, what NYSDOL is doing now

first_imgA new filing system that works to split up callers over days of the weekLess times you have to call to talk to someoneWorking to add 300 more people to answer phones on top of the 700 doing so nowAdding more hours at the telephone claim center, even on the weekend The NYSDOL says recently, its unemployment insurance filing system took on a 16,000% increase in phone calls, but say they’ve made and are making changes including: Kaitlin Spickerman worked at Jade and Rose Salon in Endicott as a hair stylist until a few weeks ago. This marks a more than 2,000% increase from last year. “The first day I was at 702 calls on just my phone… the second I had about 900 on my phone,” said Spickerman. “I’m excited to get back to work for sure,” she said. When salons were forced to shut down across New York due to the coronavirus pandemic, Spickerman was out of a job. She began the process of filing for unemployment using multiple phones and said over two days, she made thousands of calls. As for Spickerman, she was eventually able to file successfully and hopes she won’t be unemployed for long. (WBNG) — The New York State Department of Labor reports thousands of people filed for unemployment in the Southern Tier in the last few weeks and many are struggling through the process. According to the New York State Department of Labor, Spickerman joins more than 10,000 others who filed an initial claim during the week ending in March 28th, just in the Southern Tier Region. You can access the NYSDOL website here. For information about the CARES Act, click here.For information about benefits, click here.For information about how to file a claim, click here.last_img read more

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