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This Year’s 10 Most Hated College Football Fan Bases

first_imgNick Saban stares on the sideline.TUSCALOOSA, AL – SEPTEMBER 08: Head coach Nick Saban of the Alabama Crimson Tide looks on during the game against the Arkansas State Red Wolves at Bryant-Denny Stadium on September 8, 2018 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)College football season is rapidly approaching. By now, you’ve likely read dozens of prediction articles – telling you exactly what to expect for the 2016 campaign. We’re going to give you a different take on what to expect. We’re going to tell you which fan bases you won’t be able to stand this year.Yes, in any given year, it’s popular to hate on programs like Alabama and Ohio State – given their success. But there are other fan bases you’re going to get tired of hearing from this year as well.Without further ado, here are the 10 fan bases you’re going to hate this year. No. 1 won’t be a surprise, we promise.Get Started: No. 10 – Oregon Ducks >>>Pages: Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11last_img read more

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Nasa finds pulsar speeding in space at 4 mn kmhour

first_imgWashington DC: NASA has discovered a pulsar hurtling through space at nearly four million kilometres an hour — so fast that it could travel the distance between Earth and the Moon in just six minutes. Pulsars are superdense, rapidly spinning neutron stars left behind when a massive star explodes. This one, dubbed PSR J0002+6216 (J0002 for short), sports a radio-emitting tail pointing directly toward the expanding debris of a recent supernova explosion, NASA said in a statement. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US”Thanks to its narrow dart-like tail and a fortuitous viewing angle, we can trace this pulsar straight back to its birthplace,” said Frank Schinzel, a scientist at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in the US. “Further study of this object will help us better understand how these explosions are able to ‘kick’ neutron stars to such high speed,” said Schinzel. Pulsar J0002 was discovered in 2017 by a citizen-science project called [email protected], which uses time on the computers of volunteers to process Fermi gamma-ray data. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential pollsThanks to computer processing time collectively exceeding 10,000 years, the project has identified 23 gamma-ray pulsars to date, NASA said. Located about 6,500 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia, J0002 spins 8.7 times a second, producing a pulse of gamma rays with each rotation. The pulsar lies about 53 light-years from the centre of a supernova remnant called CTB 1. Its rapid motion through interstellar gas results in shock waves that produce the tail of magnetic energy and accelerated particles detected at radio wavelengths using the VLA. The tail extends 13 light-years and clearly points back to the centre of CTB 1. The team was able to measure how quickly and in what direction the pulsar is moving across our line of sight. The result supports the idea that the pulsar was kicked into high speed by the supernova responsible for CTB 1, which occurred about 10,000 years ago. J0002 is speeding through space five times faster than the average pulsar, and faster than 99 per cent of those with measured speeds. It will eventually escape our galaxy, researchers said. At first, the supernova’s expanding debris would have moved outward faster than J0002, but over thousands of years the shell’s interaction with interstellar gas produced a drag that gradually slowed this motion. Meanwhile, the pulsar, behaving more like a cannonball, steadily raced through the remnant, escaping it about 5,000 years after the explosion. Exactly how the pulsar was accelerated to such high speed during the supernova explosion remains unclear, and further study of J0002 will help shed light on the process. One possible mechanism involves instabilities in the collapsing star forming a region of dense, slow-moving matter that survives long enough to serve as a “gravitational tugboat,” accelerating the nascent neutron star toward it.last_img read more

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Tiger Woods May Not Get A Better Shot At Another Green Jacket

2007Zach Johnson613016460513 2011Charl Schwartzel224564199620 Strokes gained tee-to-green was the top category (or tied for the top) for 46 percent of the Masters winners over that span,2No other category was above 38 percent. and 62 percent of winners ranked among the Top 10 in the statistic — like Woods does this year. (This is consistent with my previous research that driving distance and approach accuracy are the two secret weapons players can possess at Augusta, causing them to play better in the Masters than their overall scoring average would predict.)I haven’t mentioned Tiger’s putting numbers yet, and with good reason. Woods used to be the greatest putter in the world, but so far this season he ranks just 74th in strokes gained with the flatstick, adding only 0.19 shots above average per round. Last year, he was better — 48th on tour — though he still wasn’t the putting maestro who once showed me and countless others the fundamentals of a great stroke. However, Augusta has frequently seen putters who rank far worse than Woods win during the era of detailed PGA Tour tracking data. (In fact, more than half of qualified Masters winners since 2004 have ranked worse than 78th in putting.) Putting performance is so random from year to year — much less from tournament to tournament or even round to round — that it’s a lot easier for a good tee-to-green player to get hot on the green for a weekend than for a good putter to suddenly have an uncharacteristically amazing weekend off the tee.Because of all this, it’s not hard to understand why Woods is a strong 12-to-1 bet to win the Masters. But it’s also not hard to imagine that this could be the 43-year-old’s last, best chance to win another green jacket. Using our research on historical major winners from a few years ago, here’s what the aging curve for championship golfers looks like: Average34.531.970.018.486.121.2 Masters winners do their best work from tee to greenStrokes gained rankings by category for Masters Tournament winners during the seasons they won, 2004-18 2018Patrick Reed104742297224 2009Ángel Cabrera3748169636351 YearMasters WinnerOff TeeApproachAround GreenTee to GreenPuttingTotal 2014Bubba Watson2476371098 2008Trevor Immelman116501131191113 As the world’s greatest golfers convene in Augusta, Georgia, this week for the Masters, it’s time for every sports fan’s annual rite of spring: wild speculation about whether Tiger Woods can add a fifth green jacket to his closet. Picking Woods used to be a trendy bet; then it began to feel like a totally futile exercise. Well after he last won the event in 2005, there was a period when Woods was in the news constantly for everything except golf success. In fact, it wasn’t too long ago that Woods’s relevance as a winning golfer seemed finished, along with his bid to chase down Jack Nicklaus’s record for all-time majors won.But that all changed last season, when Woods put everything back together again to finish eighth on the PGA Tour money list and win the season-ending Tour Championship in September. Now Woods is back, in his best position in years to win another Masters. According to VegasInsider, Woods has the third-best odds of any player to win this weekend; he’s also playing even more inspired golf than he did during last year’s comeback campaign. But at age 43, will this be one of Woods’s last chances to win at Augusta before his days of being a viable champion are over?Certainly, Tiger has been outplaying many of his much younger rivals these past few seasons. Since the end of his lost 2017 campaign, Woods ranks sixth among qualified1Minimum 30 total rounds measured by ShotLink, the PGA Tour’s real-time scoring system. PGA Tour players in total strokes gained per round, trailing only Dustin Johnson, Justin Thomas, Justin Rose, Rory McIlroy and Tommy Fleetwood. He’s mostly regained his old mastery of irons on approach shots and still has some of the game’s best feel for shots around the green. In terms of strokes gained, Woods is picking up 1.67 shots (relative to the average player) per round so far in 2019, an even better mark than the 1.60 he posted last season — which itself was easily his best performance in five years.One of the most impressive aspects of Woods’s early play this season has been improved accuracy off the tee. According to the PGA Tour, Woods has hit 65.2 percent of possible fairways on his drives this season, which ranks 54th out of 214 qualified players. That might not sound amazing, but by Woods’s standards, it is ultraprecise accuracy. Last year, he hit only 59.4 percent of fairways, which ranked him 127th, and he struggled to break 55 percent over the four injury-plagued seasons before that. (Even during his really great pre-scandal/injury seasons, hitting fairways was an Achilles’ heel. In 2007, when he made the most money playing golf of his career, Woods ranked 152nd in driving accuracy and failed to hit 60 percent of fairways.) When Woods is scuffling, the first indication is often a wayward drive that requires subsequent artistry just to make par.With the help of that improved accuracy, Woods now ranks 72nd in strokes gained on drives this year — he was 100th last year — and ninth in strokes gained from the tee to the green, picking up 1.48 shots per round before ever setting his spikes on the putting surface. Classic Tiger was always a tee-to-green monster, ranking either first or second in the category every healthy season from 2006 to 2013, so his strong performance in that category this year is another signal that Woods is returning to vintage form.It’s also a very good sign for his chances at Augusta. That’s because, as Todd Schneider wrote about for FiveThirtyEight a few years ago, the Masters often comes down to a player’s skills with the long clubs — contrary to the tournament’s reputation for being a putting contest.Great PGA Tour players generally assert themselves most on approach shots and drives anyway, gaining about 4 strokes relative to average from tee to green for every extra shot they pick up on putts. But the recent history of Masters winners also suggests that a great long game is the true prerequisite for winning the green jacket. The average winner since strokes gained was first tracked in 2004 (excluding the 2016 and 2017 winners, Danny Willett and Sergio Garcia, because they lacked enough PGA Tour rounds to qualify for official leaderboards) ranked only about 86th in putting performance per round but 35th in strokes gained off the tee, 32nd in strokes gained on approach shots and 18th in total strokes gained from tee to green. 2015Jordan Spieth15117492 2013Adam Scott21677510811 PGA Tour Rank 2017Sergio García—————— 2010Phil Mickelson66532513312 Garcia and Willett didn’t play enough rounds to qualify for the PGA Tour’s rankings during their Masters-winning seasons.Source: PGAtour.com 2004Phil Mickelson7224351289 2005Tiger Woods44128451 2012Bubba Watson1598431606 2016Danny Willett—————— 2006Phil Mickelson124664405 That spike in wins for players in their early 40s came from 42-year-olds Ernie Els, Darren Clarke, Payne Stewart, Tom Kite and Gary Player, and it was the last actual uptick on the chart — and Woods is now on the wrong side of it. Jack Nicklaus famously won his final major at age 46, but most great golfers are largely done winning by their early to mid-40s. And the game has only gotten younger in the twilight of Woods’s career; while the average major-winner in our data set above (through 2014) was 31.9, that number is just 29.6 in the years since. With his own early career dominance and popularity, Woods has inspired a younger generation of gifted golfers that he now must do battle with.Woods is a special talent and in the conversation for the greatest golfer ever.3Even though most fans still give Nicklaus the nod. He’s playing as well heading into Augusta as he has in a long time and excelling in exactly the right categories. But between aging effects and his own injury history, he may never have a better shot at winning another Masters than he does right now. Once upon a time, Tiger was legendary for pouncing on every opportunity left in front of him. We’ll just have to see if he can summon that ability yet again. read more

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Womens soccer OSU preps for NCAA tournament showdown versus Dayton

Members of the Ohio State women’s soccer team huddles before a game at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. Credit: Aaron Tomich | Lantern ReporterThe Ohio State women’s soccer team is gearing up for the final act of the season commencing on Saturday. The Buckeyes (10-6-3, 4-4-3 Big Ten) kick off the first round of the NCAA tournament against the Dayton Flyers (9-9-3, 4-4-2 Atlantic 10) at 6 p.m. at Jesse Owens Stadium.OSU senior defender Bridget Skinner expressed excitement about receiving news of the team’s bid into the NCAA tournament, noting that the Buckeyes are champing at the bit with special motivation and strong anticipation of their matchup against their in-state opponent, the Dayton Flyers.  “We’re just pretty pumped that we’re at home and get a chance to play them,” Skinner said.  Coming off of three week’s rest, Skinner took time to discuss the team’s mentality behind the gap between its last game and Saturday’s upcoming match. This included a couple days of physical and mental rest, along with the idea of a fresh start.“We really did look at it as this completely new season,” she said. “Like, it’s postseason, the regular season happened, and this is a completely new season.”OSU coach Lori Walker focused on motivating the Buckeyes during the break, as they sat aside during the Big Ten tournament.  “Everybody else is playing, so as a competitor, you get a very nauseous feeling that you’ve been left out of something,” Walker said.Walker noted that the team capitalized on the odd feeling of being left out, continuing to emphasize the concept that “winners don’t like to be left out of things,” as extra motivation for Saturday. She said that given Dayton has played three games in four days last weekend, the Buckeyes are focusing on attacking a fatigued Flyers team.“We know Dayton well.  They’re a really good team,” Walker said.  “They’ve had some success here and there, and at the end of their season, so we’re excited to play them on Saturday.”OSU senior forward Lindsay Agnew hopes the break from competitive play refocused the team going into Saturday night. Echoing the same team mentality, Agnew looks at this matchup as a new season. In saying that, she and the team as a whole focused on what has been improved all season long.“We took a couple days off at the beginning to reset and refocus,” Agnew said. “But since then, we’ve been basically just getting back to the basics: goal-scoring, shot-blocking and working on our midfield movements, just all the foundational stuff.”To take advantage of Dayton’s short rest, Agnew stressed the importance of ball movement and connecting midfielder crosses to forwards, eventually leading to more scoring opportunities.Dayton poses a threat to the OSU defense with junior forward Alexis Kiehl, who currently sits tied for most goals scored this season in the NCAA with 20.  Although Kiehl’s numbers are daunting, the Buckeyes’ back-line is prepared to combat a potent offense.“I think if we stick to this game plan, we’ll be fine,” Skinner said. “And it will be kind of irrelevant that (Kiehl) has scored 20 goals,” Skinner said. read more

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Could this year be the year

In college football, where BCS formulas, strengths of schedules and computer rankings determine end-of-season opportunities, one loss can tarnish a season. By mid-September last year, an 18-15 loss at home to USC had spoiled Ohio State’s national title hopes. An October loss to Purdue was icing on the cake. But every offseason, each school is granted a clean slate, and OSU captured the No. 2 ranking in many preseason ballots. Aside from annual conference battles with Wisconsin and Iowa, both ranked in the top 15, the Buckeyes’ championship aspirations were hinged on the outcome of a matchup with Miami (Fla.). Unlike marquee non-conference matchups of recent years past, the Buckeyes played up to their competition, as the 36-24 final difference seemed to reflect inadequately the talent differential on the field that afternoon. OSU intercepted Miami quarterback Jacory Harris four times, while Buckeye quarterback Terrelle Pryor threw for 233 yards and rushed for 113 more. “As long as we continue to grow, this (win) is huge,” OSU coach Jim Tressel said. “I think they’re a top-10 team. In my mind, going into the game, I was interested to see if we were a top-10 team.” The last time OSU avoided an early season loss to a highly regarded opponent, 2007, the Scarlet and Gray reached the BCS Championship game before falling to Louisiana State University. That year, Washington was the nonconference challenge, and the Buckeyes pounced on the Cougars, 33-14. A year earlier, OSU knocked off Texas in Austin, 24-7, and carried the momentum from the win — the Bucks were ranked No. 1 and the Longhorns No. 2 entering the game — into the national title game before being upset by Florida. So the Buckeyes have been here before. But will they reach the title game like they did on each of the two previous occasions? “The problem with ratings and whatnot is you have to prove it every week,” Tressel said. “I think we proved it (against Miami) that we’re a top-10 team, and now we’ve got to prove it next week and the next week.” The Buckeyes saved the meat of their conference schedule for the end, finishing league play with a trio of games against Penn State, at Iowa and home against Michigan. The road test against the Hawkeyes and a trip to Camp Randall to visit Wisconsin should provide the stiffest challenges to OSU’s hopes of maintaining an unblemished record. But for now, with one major hurdle successfully cleared, the Buckeyes have time to make progress and continue on their path toward what they hope is another shot at hardware. “We can be a good football team,” Tressel said. “You have to play hard to be good. Now you have to start playing better to be real good, and I think our guys understand that. … We’ve got a lot of things we’ve got to square away. It’s September, we’ve just got to keep trying to get better.” read more

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League Blue Jackets say Columbus hosting NHL Winter Classic is pure speculation

Columbus is still in the running for a major NHL event, but it isn’t the 2012 Winter Classic.Both the NHL and the Columbus Blue Jackets refuted speculation that Columbus was a potential host for the 2012 edition of the Classic.Ryan Holtmann, manager of communications for the Blue Jackets, said the rumors might have originated from an opinion column that was published in the Canadian newspaper, The Globe and Mail. Holtmann also said that even though Columbus is one of few cities that has the appropriate climate for the NHL’s popular outdoor event, the Blue Jackets “haven’t been contacted by the NHL or made aware that we’re finalists for the 2012 Winter Classic.”John Dellapina, the NHL’s senior director of media relations, said, “having just emerged from the 2011 game, we still are reviewing the Pittsburgh event. Any speculation at this point about the site of the 2012 NHL Winter Classic or any subsequent one is just that: speculation.”However, Columbus is in contention for another marquee NHL event.Linda Logan, executive director of the Greater Columbus Sports Commission, is still optimistic about the 18-month-old bid to bring the 2013 NHL All-Star Game to the city.“We’d be a great host for the All-Star Game,” Logan said. “We’re a great sports town, and this event would be in-keeping with that tradition.”Holtmann said there is no timeline for a decision to be made on where the 2013 All-Star Game will be held.As far as a future bid for the Winter Classic in Columbus is concerned, Ohio Stadium, a potential venue, could be a deciding factor. Dellapina said the Horseshoe could only boost a bid for the Classic.“Ohio Stadium is one of the iconic venues in American sports,” Dellapina said. “Any event staged there is made more special by its setting. An NHL Winter Classic played there would be no different.” read more

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Football Ryan Day Greg Schiano prepare Ohio State for No 15 TCU

Ohio State finished the 2017 season in Arlington, Texas, ending the season with a 24-7 win over USC in the 2017 Cotton Bowl Classic. In the first road game of the 2018 season, the Buckeyes will return to AT&T Stadium to take on No. 15 TCU. In his weekly press conference, acting head coach Ryan Day said his approach for the first road game of the season is not the same as any neutral-site match-up. He said Ohio State is looking at this as a true road game, facing a team that usually plays 18 miles away. Day said many on Ohio State’s roster will have some sort of familiarity with AT&T Stadium, just with the experience the team had preparing for the 2017 Cotton Bowl. However, to him, that is just a minor advantage Ohio State could have against a TCU team that is close to home. “At the end of the day, it just comes down to going in to play,” Day said. “Obviously a beautiful stadium and they will have a great crowd, so it will be a hostile crowd.”Ohio State not only has to prepare for what the coaching staff considers a hostile road environment for the first time this season, but also preparing for a ranked opponent in that environment.With head coach Urban Meyer still facing the final game of his suspension, Day said the offensive play call sheets will continue to be made with Meyer during the week prior to the game on Saturday. However, Day said he is not preparing a new offense for TCU. “We are going to be who we are and do what we are. I think when you start to stray and focus on other things, like it being a big game, that’s when you get distracted. We’ve got to focus on us and if we play the way that we know we can play, then that’s going to give us the best chance to win.” Day said the level of competition that Ohio State will face on Saturday just comes with the job, having the expectation to bring the team’s “A-game” every week. “If you don’t think it’s a big game, try losing it, you know,” Day said. “So they are all big, and you’ve got to play hard. Every game you’ve got to be ready, you’ve got to be prepared and do a great job.” Safety rotation continues with the return of Jordan Fuller After missing the first game of the 2018 season against Oregon State with a hamstring injury, junior safety Jordan Fuller returned to the Ohio State defense on Saturday against Rutgers. Recording three tackles and one pass break-up, Fuller helped the Buckeyes pass defense to allow 65 yards, forcing two interceptions against Rutgers. Even Fuller’s presence in the backfield was huge for Ohio State, according to defensive coordinator Greg Schiano. Describing Fuller as an athlete with good anticipation and vision in Monday’s press conference, Schiano said his versatility and different attributes are very vital to the success of the Ohio State secondary as a whole. “Jordan would be good whatever he did,” Schiano said. “He came here as a corner. He could play corner. He’s got that kind of coverage skills. He could play receiver and he was a quarterback in high school. He has a real good spatial awareness and he’s a good tackler.”Schiano said the starting safety spot next to Fuller is still an ongoing battle, saying that the players battling for playing time are “young.” The defensive coordinator said he was encouraged by the play of sophomore safety Isaiah Pryor, but said he is still young and needs more reps. He also said redshirt freshman cornerback Shaun Wade, who had played nickel safety for Ohio State on Saturday, “is getting better and better.”Even with the performances from Wade, Pryor and redshirt sophomore Jahsen Wint, Schiano is still not ready to name a full-time starter at the position opposite Fuller. “They are all the same age, so we’re going to keep that thing going for a bit and see if one of them can pull away,” Schiano said. Middle linebackerSchiano has made it clear in the past he believes in his linebacker depth, saying Monday he will play more than three starting linebackers because, “I think we have more than three linebackers.” With redshirt sophomore Tuf Borland receiving more playing time as he continues to recover from an Achilles injury, Schiano was asked about the split of playing time between Borland and sophomore Baron Browning, who had been starting for Ohio State in the middle. Schiano said both linebackers have improved, but both will continue to split playing time as Borland continues to recover and Browning, in the words of Schiano, continues to get his feet underneath him at the position. However, both players bring a unique playing style to the middle linebacker position, something Schiano said he will continue to utilize in the rotation. “Tuf has got just such a sense for the football,” Schiano said. “He seems to be around the ball all the time, and Baron has an unbelievable ability to cover ground. If you look at him, for a big man, or for anybody, he runs extremely well.” read more

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The latest on United States immigration policy with Jessica McClain and Mark

first_img Posted: June 22, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, Sandra Maas, Allen Denton, The latest on United States immigration policy with Jessica McClain and Mark Larson 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings Categories: California News, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Updated: 7:09 PM KUSI Newsroom, Sandra Maas, Allen Denton 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Earlier this week, President Trump signed an executive order ending the separation of immigrant families at the border. He then urged congress to work to create and pass immigration reform.RELATED STORY: Trump delivers remarks on immigration with Angel FamiliesAfter a Republican backed immigration bill failed and another was delayed, President Trump suggested lawmakers wait until after November to get any real work done.KUSI Contributors Jessica McClain and Mark Larson joined us in studio to explain the latest details over the recent controversy surrounding the United State immigration policy. McClain’s interview can be seen at the top of the article and Larson’s below. June 22, 2018last_img read more

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