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Everyday Legends: The Ordinary People Changing Our World, the Stories of 20 Great UK Social Entrepreneurs

first_img  18 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Everyday Legends: The Ordinary People Changing Our World, the Stories of 20 Great UK Social Entrepreneurs Howard Lake | 19 January 2008 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Lake Avenue Church’s Chili Cook-Off to be Held on August 23

first_img Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Top of the News Do you have a great recipe for chili? Why not enter your recipe in Lake Avenue Church’s “Chili Cook-off”. Lake Avenue Church will be featuring amazing Chili’s to be tasted and judged on Friday, August 17. To enter the contest participants need to make some of their famous chili recipe to be tasted by Lake Avenue Church’s classic car night friends as well as judged by surprise judges. Entry fee is $15 which gets participants a goodie bag and a Classic Car Night T-shirt – and the possibility of winning the coveted Chili Trophy! To register click here!Grandparents and grandkids, moms and dads, neighbors, out-of-town visitors come enjoy the many classic cars (and motorcycles, hot rods, exotics and even a couple of customized farm tractors) on display for up-close-and-personal inspection. The Night will include live music and raffles along with BBQ burgers and hot dogs cooked to order on site. Everyone is invited. Admission is free and donations will be accepted for the food.For more information contact Debbie Gonzalez at [email protected] or call (626) 817-4881.Lake Avenue Church, 393 N. Lake Avenue, Pasadena, (626) 844-4700 or visit www.lakeave.org. Subscribe EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. 4 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Make a comment Business News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Community Newscenter_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Faith & Religion News Lake Avenue Church’s Chili Cook-Off to be Held on August 23 August 23, 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at LAC West Parking Lot From STAFF REPORTS Published on Thursday, August 15, 2013 | 5:26 pm More Cool Stuff Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena HerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyRed Meat Is Dangerous And Here Is The ProofHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyTiger Woods’ Ex Wife Found A New Love PartnerHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou’ll Want To Get Married Twice Or Even More Just To Put Them OnHerbeautyHerbeautylast_img read more

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Rubisco “Highly Tuned” for Fixing Atmospheric Carbon

first_imgRubisco sounds like a brand of cracker or something, but it’s actually an air cleaner your life depends on.  It’s an enzyme that fixes atmospheric carbon for use by photosynthetic microbes and plants.  In doing so, it sweeps the planet of excess carbon dioxide – the greenhouse gas implicated in discussions of global warming – making it a politically important molecule as well the most economically important enzyme on earth.  Rubisco is the most common enzyme in the world, too; every person on earth benefits from his or her own 12 to 25 pounds of these molecular machines, which process 15% of the total pool of atmospheric carbon per year.  For a long time, biochemists thought this enzyme was slow and inefficient.  That view is changing.  Rubisco now appears to be perfectly optimized for its job.Rubisco’s cute name is a handy anagram for the clumsier appellation ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase.  Tcherkez et al. first broke the paradigmatic logjam about this enzyme’s purported inefficiency with an article in PNAS,1 titled, “Despite slow catalysis and confused substrate specificity, all ribulose bisphosphate carboxylases may be nearly perfectly optimized.”  Howard Griffiths commented this week in Nature2 about this paper and the new findings about its optimization.  Though his article referred to evolution seven times, and only mentioned design twice, the latter word seemed the most valuable player.There are four classes of Rubisco, some more efficient at fixing carbon than others.  Its reputation as a slow enzyme (2-8 catalytic events per second) may be unfair.  Carbon dioxide in gaseous form has to compete for access to the active site against the much more abundant and lighter oxygen.  Griffiths shows what a difficult job this molecule has to perform; no wonder it leaks somewhat.  But, as he explains, even the leaks are accommodated:It is curious that Rubisco should fix CO2 at all, as there is 25 times more O2 than CO2 in solution at 25°C, and a 500-fold difference between them in gaseous form.  Yet only 25% of reactions are oxygenase events at this temperature, and carbon intermediates ‘lost’ to the carbon fixation reactions by oxygenase action are metabolized and partly recovered by the so-called photorespiratory pathway.  Catalysis begins with activation of Rubisco by the enzyme Rubisco activase, when first CO2 and then a magnesium ion bind to the active site.  The substrate, ribulose bisphosphate, then reacts with these to form an enediol intermediate, which engages with either another CO2 or an O2 molecule, either of which must diffuse down a solvent channel to reach the active site.This is a harder job than designing a funnel that will pass only tennis balls, when there are 500 times more ping-pong balls trying to get through.  Not only is Rubisco good at getting the best mileage from a sloppy process, it may actually turn the inefficiency to advantage.  Griffiths started by claiming, “evolution has made the best of a bad job,” but ended by saying that the enzyme’s reputation as “intransigent and inefficient” is a lie.  Why?  It now appears that “Rubisco is well adapted to substrate availability in contrasting habitats.”  This means its inefficiency is really disguised adaptability.Experimenters thought they could “improve” on Rubisco by mutating it.  They found that their slight alterations to the reactivity of the enediol intermediate drastically favored the less-desirable oxygenase reaction.  This only served to underscore the contortions the molecule must undergo to optimize the carboxylase reaction:Such observations provided the key to the idea that in the active site the enediol must be contorted to allow CO2 to attack more readily despite the availability of O2 molecules.  The more the enediol mimics the carboxylate end-product, Tcherkez et al. conclude, the more difficult it is for the enzyme to free the intermediate from the active site when the reaction is completed.  When the specificity factor and selectivity for CO2 are high, the impact on associated kinetic properties is greatest: kcat [i.e., the rate of enzyme catalytic events per second] becomes slower.So, rather than being inefficient, Rubisco has become highly tuned to match substrate availability.Another finding about the inner workings of Rubisco bears on dating methods and climate models.  Scientists have known that Rubisco favors the lighter, faster-moving carbon isotope 12C over 13C.  By measuring the ratio of these stable isotopes in organic deposits, paleoclimatologists have inferred global carbon dioxide abundances and temperatures (knowing that Rubisco processes the isotopes differently).  That assumption may be dubious:Several other correlates are also explained by this relationship.  For instance, Rubisco discriminates more against 13C than against 12C, the two naturally occurring stable isotopes in CO2.  But when the specificity factor is high, the 13C reaction intermediate binds more tightly, and so carbon isotope discrimination is higher (that is, less 13C is incorporated); in consequence, the carbon-isotope signals used to reconstruct past climates should perhaps now be re-examined.  In contrast, higher ambient temperatures (30-40 °C) reduce the stability of the enediol, and Rubisco oxygenase activity and photorespiration rate increase.Those considerations aside, Griffiths is most interested in two things: how this enzyme evolved, and whether we can improve on it.  If we can raise its carboxylation efficiency, we might be able to increase crop yields.  So far, genetic engineers have not succeeded.3As for the evolution of Rubisco, he mentions three oddball cases but fails to explain exactly how they became optimized for their particular circumstances – only that they are optimized.  Yet their abilities seem rather remarkable.  For instance, though the “least efficient” forms of Rubisco reside in microbes living in anaerobic sediments, where oxygen competition is not a problem, “One bacterium can express all three catalytically active forms (I, II and III), and switches between them depending on environmental conditions.”  In another real-world case, “some higher plants and photosynthetic microorganisms have developed mechanisms to suppress oxygenase activity: CO2-concentrating mechanisms are induced either biophysically or biochemically.”  In another example, “Rubisco has not been characterized in the so-called CAM plants, which use a form of photosynthesis (crassulacean acid metabolism) adapted for arid conditions.”  These plants, including cacti and several unrelated species scattered throughout the plant kingdom, have other mechanisms for dealing with their extreme environments.  In every mention of evolution, therefore, Griffiths assumed it rather than explaining it: viz., “The systematic evolution of enzyme kinetic properties seems to have occurred in Rubisco from different organisms, suggesting that Rubisco is well adapted to substrate availability in contrasting habitats.”So, can we improve on it?  If so, given all the praise for what evolution accomplished, Griffiths seems oblivious to the implications of his own concluding sentence:Other research avenues include manipulating the various components of Rubisco and cell-specific targeting of chimaeric Rubiscos.  Potential pitfalls here are that the modified Rubisco would not only have to be incorporated and assembled by crop plants, but any improved performance would have to be retained by the plants.  Finally, one suggestion is that we should engineer plants that can express two types of Rubisco – each with kinetic properties to take advantage of the degree of shading within a crop canopy.  Such rational design would not only offer practical opportunities for the future, but also finally give the lie to the idea that Rubisco is intransigent and inefficient.What, students, is a synonym for “rational design”?1Tcherkez et al., “Despite slow catalysis and confused substrate specificity, all ribulose bisphosphate carboxylases may be nearly perfectly optimized,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, published online before print April 26, 2006, 10.1073/pnas.0600605103 PNAS | May 9, 2006 | vol. 103 | no. 19 | 7246-7251.2Howard Griffiths, “Plant biology: Designs on Rubisco,” Nature 441, 940-941 (22 June 2006) | doi:10.1038/441940a; Published online 21 June 2006.3If and when they do, the benefit would be tuned for humans and their livestock, not necessarily for the ecology or atmosphere.Folks, here you have it again.  What Griffiths meant as a paper praising evolution is really a paper demonstrating intelligent design.  We dare any evolutionist to explain how this “highly-tuned” enzyme, with the optimized contortions of its intermediates and its “highly conserved” (i.e., unevolved) active site, arose by an unguided process, especially how a lowly bacterium – the simplest of organisms – evolved three forms of it and can switch between them depending on environmental conditions!  And don’t say it evolved because evolution is a fact.Here again, also, we see how further research is giving “the lie to the idea” that something in nature “is intransigent and inefficient.”  Evolutionists love to showcase examples of inefficiency in nature, to give the impression that any God or designer would not do such a bungled job.  The only bungling is in the theories of evolutionists who look at optimized, rational design in the face and can’t see a rational designer.  Human rational design applied to improving on nature’s engineering marvels does not support evolution, it supports intelligent design.  If human intelligence is required to copy or modify a design, one cannot say that the original design “emerged” by an unguided, purposeless, material process.  Why is that such a hard concept for the Darwinists to grasp?  Why can’t they see the illogic of their position?  As usual, they merely assume evolution can perform any engineering job necessary, even designing nanomachinery that exceeds our human capabilities.Notice the snippet about climate models in this story, also.  It goes to show that assumptions about the unobservable past, like foundations under a house of cards, can shift under new research.  Though Griffiths was not specific about the degree of alteration climate models might suffer, this is a point to remember whenever popular science reports glibly claim things like “218.24267 gazillion years ago, the atmosphere went through a period of global warming followed by a snowball earth.”You may never have heard about this indispensable enzyme that helps keep you breathing and gives you salad to eat (and, indirectly, meat from plant-eating animals).  Astrobiologists had better pay attention.  Mars and Venus have lots of carbon dioxide, but no Rubisco.  Earth has just enough CO2 to help moderate the atmospheric temperature, but not too much to cause a catastrophic greenhouse effect; that balance is maintained in part by this highly-tuned enzyme.  Our ability to read and write and think these thoughts owes to the convergence of numerous improbable factors, including our planet’s optimal distance from the sun, a global magnetic field, a planetary mass that retains the right ingredients but lets others escape, a transparent atmosphere, a star that produces radiation with just the right energy range for molecular reactions, and optimally engineered molecular machines in plants that can harvest that energy.  As a result, our lungs have air, our bodies have food, and our eyes have beauty and variety to enjoy.  If this looks like intelligent design, and if that has philosophical or religious implications, so be it.  Thank God for Rubisco. (Visited 123 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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iPhone to Android: Making the Nexus S Do Your Bidding

first_imgWith Tasker, you can automate the switching on and off of various functions, such as Location services or Wi-Fi, but you can do so much more, too. The way Tasker’s website describes it is that the app lets you perform tasks (actions) based on contexts (application, time of day, location, event, gesture) in user-defined profilesor in clickable or timer-based homescreen widgets.A few (really, just a few!) of the things Tasker can do:Passcode-lock sensitive applicationsChange phone settings by:Application: long screen timeout in a book readerTime: screen brightness lower in the eveningLocation: ringer volume high at the office, turn off ke yguard at homeWake up with a random song from your music collectionText-to-speech; read out loud: incoming SMS/ phone number, WiFi/Bluetooth status, when it’s time for an appointment, when the battery is low etc etc (Android OS 1.6+ only)Launch a music application when your music SD card is insertedChange all your home icons and wallpaper every day, or in particular locations (like work)Turn the phone upside down to return to the home screen, tilt 90 degrees to the left and back to toggle speakerphone during a callRemap camera buttons to other applicationsDecrypt/encrypt and/or zip/unzip application data on the fly when an application is launched/exitsPause music playback while in a particular application, restart on exitChange the Home icon for any applicationTake a time-lapse photo series (possibly ‘secretly’)Make a regular backup of a file on the SD cardTrack your phone location via SMS in case of theftShow a popup when an SMS arrives from a particular phone numberSetup a birthday SMS to be sent months before it happens so you don’t forgetRecord battery levels over time to a file on SD cardMake automatic recordings of what you say during phone calls to SD cardDuring the night, turn on airplane mode to conserve battery/reduce radiation, but turn it off every 15 minutes to check for SMS/voicemail.Setup a vacation SMS message, with different messages for different callersLaunch a music application when headphones are connectedIt’s a powerful, powerful application. And more than a little intimidating.Not only to you have to configure these tasks, you have to think about overlap and precedence. You have to think about how you’ll manage your profiles, and what sorts of tasks will be assigned to them. Will you have profiles for “Work” and “Home,” times of day, locations, or all of the above?But despite a fairly non-intuitive user interface, I understood, after playing around with it, how Tasker works. An I.T. background probably helped, too. Also, all those years of creating Outlook email rules (if this, then that…). It’s the same concept for Tasker. If I’m sleeping, turn notifications sounds off. If I plug in my headphones and launch MOG, turn the volume to the maximum setting. You get the idea.Tasker BasicsHere’s how it works, in short:Tap “New” on the launch screen for a new profile and name it.Pick a “First Context” on the screen that pops up (options are application, time, day, location, state, or event). Configure that context (what app, what time, what day, what location, what state or event), tap “Done”Create a task by tapping “New Task” on the screen that pops up (or pick one you’ve already made from the list)Name the new taskClick the plus sign to add an action. Select the action category (e.g. Alert, Audio, App, Dialog, File, Phone, Media, etc.)Select the action from the list that appears and configure it.Tap “Done”There’s a lot more to it than that, of course, but those are the basic steps.It’s robust, it’s genius, it’s…well, kind of nerdy.Becoming a Power Android User…A Tech Nerd Rebirth?Calling the app “nerdy” actually has a lot of appeal to some Android users out there, let’s face it. Many of Android’s power users are attracted to the platform because of capabilities like these. The deeper you get into becoming a power user yourself, the more often you find yourself turning to forums, how-to articles, wikis, user manuals and the like. You start becoming a bit of tech nerd yourself.The process reminds me very much of my days in I.T. where the typical end user sat in front a powerful machine, capable of doing so very many things, but was baffled as how to perform the simplest task. Only the tech elite really understood computers, and would disdainfully, begrudgingly fix yours for you if you asked nicely. Many weeks have passed since my iPhone met its unfortunate end thanks to a dive into a pond that left it, even after i-Hospitalization, without Wi-Fi, a functional USB port (it charges, but does not sync) and with a flaky Bluetooth connection. Now, the Mute switch has stopped working, too. Who knows what will fail next?In the meantime, I’ve made the switch to the Nexus S, and have been documenting that process here, in a series of posts, with the hopes that other iPhone users curious about the world of Android may learn something through my trials and tribulations. This week, I’m starting to delve into the power of Android automation, and I’ve found that this may be the key selling point for Android. Or alternately, the the one area that has you running back to the iPhone for good.If you’ve haven’t been following my transition, you can start here with my one-week review, then check in again here when I hit one month. I’ve now reached a month and a half. This is an ongoing series.Automating the EverydayEarlier this month, I complained about the battery life issues of using this particular Android phone. From what I’ve heard, the Nexus S has a better battery than some other Android phones out there, but it still doesn’t compare to what I was used to from the iPhone world.To prolong battery life, you can use a widget that ships with many Android devices. This widget provides easy access to some of the phone’s functions from the homescreen, including Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Location services, Brightness and Sync. When battery life is a concern, turning off unneeded functions can give your phone a bit of extra juice. The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology I can see the same parallels forming among the Android user base. There are the tech elite, the nerds who can – oh, I don’t know – set up your Tasker for you, maybe? And there’s everyone else – the regular folks who just want to browse the Web, text their friends and run apps. The power of Android – that is, power on this level – escapes them. Or it’s only accessible via rooting.And rooting a phone? Really? For the mainstream, it’s just not going to happen. The rooting process on Android is considerably more challenging than jailbreaking an iPhone, a task where, in true Apple spirit, even the hackers themselves provide end users with simple, DIY hacking tools. But rooting is also largely unnecessary for the mainstream Android user because the platform is not as locked down as iPhone is from the get-go. You don’t have to root to make dramatic changes to your Android, you just have to download an app or change a setting.While I personally applaud the initiative it took to create an app like Tasker, and can revel in the control it gives you over your phone, I can firmly attest that’s it’s not for everyone. (And yes, I realize there are simpler apps that can do a subset of these things. For example, search for “profile” apps in the Android Market. I was checking out the plainly named “Settings Profile” app myself for a more basic profile switcher option). Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement iPhone or Android? Ask Yourself ThisBut Tasker’s very existence is a perfect example of the Android/iPhone disparity. It provides you with the control and freedom to hack away at your phone, while making it just hard enough that the average user won’t bother. This is typical Android. (At least, Android as I know it now).A good many Android app designs tend towards the engineering side of things, not the design. In doing so, unfortunately, some of Android’s capabilities becomes less accessible to all users.  That’s a shame. sarah perez The fact is, the problems surrounding the complexities of technology were never really the end user’s fault – it was the interface. Apple proved that even the so-called “mainstream” users could embrace technology and understand how to use it – you just had to make it simpler. That’s what the iPhone is. Simpler.And that either appeals to you or it does not. It’s that easy.With the iPhone, you would never find an app like Tasker, and many users would never want to. If you don’t want to be bothered by notification pings, you flip the Mute switch on the side of the iPhone. If you want a different profile for work than for home…well, too bad. You don’t really need that, do you? Nor do you really need the hundreds of other things Tasker lets you do, right?Ask yourself that question. Your answer will tell you a lot about what phone is right for you.It’s a question I’m debating myself right now.I’m busy, I have a full-time job and a toddler. I realize that giving up control for simplification is a trade-off, but one I’ve been willing to make for years with iPhone. Control, as much as I thought I needed it, was less of a selling point for me than the other things I love about Android (see the previous post in this series for more on that).But it’s still possible for iPhone to win me back. I just want more of the good stuff from Android on the iPhone: better notifications and alerts, multiple homescreens with widgets, more customization options and new technology like NFC (near field communication, a mobile payments enabler). Will a future iPhone provide? Will I one day return? Maybe. But for now, only Android gives me the things I want. So for now I’ll stay here. Note: not my phone – image credit: Business InsiderBut this attempt to maximize your battery can quickly devolve into a time-consuming effort. Turn on location, check-in on Foursquare, turn off location. Arrive home, turn on Wi-Fi, leave home, turn off Wi-Fi, etc.Of course, as pointed out by many commenters, you don’t actually have to perform all these tasks manually – this is Android, after all. Any of its perceived or real shortcomings can be shored up with an app, I’m told.Introducing Tasker, the App that Does it AllOne such app is Tasker, an automaton’s dream.Granted, this app isn’t for the faint of heart. It’s a bit overly complex for your average user, I’ll admit. But you can get your phone to do almost anything if you’re willing to brave its documentation, read the online wiki and experiment. Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Related Posts What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Tags:#Apple#Google#mobile#Product Reviews#web last_img read more

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Connecticut Zero Energy Challenge Announces Winners

first_imgFour of the 11 entries in the 2010-2011 Connecticut Zero Energy Challenge found their way to the winners’ circle, each taking a different path to exemplary energy efficiency performance.The winner of the $10,000 grand prize, for example, is Sam and Teri Norman’s 2,492-sq.-ft. four-bedroom single-family in Coventry, which posted the lowest combined contest score (including the building’s HERS Index rating), and features a ground-source heat pump and a PV system, and cost $101 per sq. ft. to construct. With an R-10 slab, R-40 ceiling, and R-33 walls sealed using Huber’s AdvanTech Zip System sheathing and tape, the house relies mostly on its passive-solar design for heat. The Normans say they consider the heat pump to be a backup heating system. There’s also a wood stove in a central part of the home, which features an open floor plan. A 2,800-sq.-ft. two-bedroom in Voluntown, meanwhile, won in the “most affordable” category (measured by cost per sq. ft.), earning homeowners John and Delaine Simonds a Challenge prize of $5,000. This house also relies heavily on its passive solar design for heat, as well as on a ground-source heat pump for heating and cooling. The home has a leased photovoltaic system.A small house wins once and a big house wins twiceThe smallest single-family of the 11 entries, a 1,728-sq.-ft. three-bedroom in Ashford, won $5,000 in the Challenge category ranking HERS Index ratings when the entries operate without their renewable-energy systems. This house, whose exterior walls and roof were constructed of structural insulated panels, includes a 4.2-kW photovoltaic system and a ground-source heat pump.That takes care of three prize categories. But there actually are five prizes in this edition of the Challenge, and the fourth house to win – Bernard Zahren’s 5,327-sq.-ft. five-bedroom in Avon – won the remaining two prizes: $5,000 for the lowest overall HERS Index score (minus 9) and another $5,000 for the lowest projected annual net operating costs. The project has a ground-source heat pump and two renewable energy systems: a solar hot water system and a wind turbine that sits on a 100-ft. tower and can generate about 21,497 kWh of power annually. The house also is designed to accommodate a photovoltaic array on its highest roof.GBA posted a brief on Zahren’s project as it got underway in 2009 and noted its insulation strategy (R-20 foundation and flooring, R-40 exterior walls, and an R-60 roof) and the fact that it is a renovation of what was a very leaky three-story 3,300-sq.-ft. house.Sponsors and rulesThe contest is sponsored by the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund energy conservation initiative and five utilities: Connecticut Light & Power, the United Illuminating Company, Connecticut Natural Gas, Southern Connecticut Gas, and Yankeegas.Unlike the 2009-2010 edition of the Challenge, there was no size limit on the 2010-2011 entries. The group of 11 projects includes dwellings as small as the 1,576-sq.-ft. units in a set of three duplexes in Hartford and the 1,728-sq.-ft. three-bedroom in Ashford. The largest is a 6,500-sq.-ft. five-bedroom in Avon.All entries had to be a customer of one of the participating utilities and had to be analyzed and scored by a certified HERS rater before construction began and after construction was completed. Owner-occupied entries eligible for rebates on photovoltaic installations through the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund were required to install a PV system. Builders of non-owner-occupied homes, which are not eligible for CEEF rebates, had to design their projects to be PV-ready and, if they didn’t install a system, were given a “simulated” PV system credit of 1 kW per 1,000 sq. ft. of living space.last_img read more

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To Create Greater Value Be Future Oriented

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now Staking out that trusted advisor, Level 4 Value Creator™ position requires that you do more than sell your client what they need right now. To own that position, you have to be future-oriented. You have to help your dream client build a platform that helps them deliver the results they need now and in the future.Solve More Than the Current Problem: When your dream client raises their hand and asks for your help, you are already too late; you’re not being proactive. Similarly, if you are only solving their current problem or challenge, you are also failing them. Your role is to know what your client doesn’t yet know, to anticipate what they need. Your solution needs to solve more than your customer’s existing problem, challenge, or opportunity. Even if it is more expensive. Even if it takes longer to make the sale. Even if it makes them uncomfortable.Platform for Future Results: What are you selling your dream client? It is easy to withhold the biggest, best value creating solution you have because you believe it is more than your client presently needs. But your role as a consultative selling, trusted advisor, Level 4 Value Creator is to look at what your client’s future needs are going to be and help them get there. What you recommend and provide needs to help build a platform for who they are going to be and what they are going to need in the future. What you sell should help ensure that when the future arrives, your dream client is in position to take advantage of that future.QuestionsIs what you are providing your dream clients going to solve only their existing problem?Does what you sell your dream client also position them for greater results in the future?Do you propose solutions that aren’t really future-oriented because you fear it will be too complicated or lengthen the time it takes to win?Do you know what your dream client is going to need to be able to do to produce better results in the future? Do you have a solution that will help build the platform for those future results?last_img read more

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