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The Groove Orient Shares Exclusive Summer Tour Footage & Announces Fall Tour Dates

first_imgThe full tour schedule can be seen below, and more information is available on the band’s website.The Groove Orient Fall Tour Dates9/3 ­ Dunedin Brewery ­ Dunedin, FL9/9 ­ Tanquerays ­ Orlando, FL9/10 ­ Ruby’s Elixer ­ St. Petersburg, FL9/17 ­ One Stop ­ Asheville, NC ­ (WSP After Party)9/18 ­ Arts in The Heart Festival ­ Augusta, GA9/23 ­ Planet Sarbez ­ St. Augustine, FL (WSP After Party)9/24 + 9/25 ­ Pass The Good Music Festival ­ Vertex Springs in Ponce De Leon, FL9/27 + 9/28 ­ Preservation Pub ­ Knoxville, TN9/29 ­ Martin’s Downtown ­ Roanoke, VA9/30 ­ Blue Side ­ Frederick, MD10/1 ­ Meeting of the MINDS Music & Camping Festival­ Schuylkill Haven, PA10/6 ­ The Social ­ Orlando, FL (TGO ft. Kaleigh Baker supporting The Main Squeeze)10/7 ­ Crowbar ­ Ybor City, FL (TGO ft. Kaleigh Baker supporting The Main Squeeze)10/8 ­ 1904 Music Hall ­ Jacksonville, FL (TGO ft. Kaleigh Baker supporting The Main Squeeze)10/27 ­ 10/30 ­ Suwannee Hulaween ­ Live Oak, FL (Kaleigh Baker w/ The Groove Orient)[Photo by Arielle D’Ornellas, poster art by Jimmy Rector] Closing out their first ever national tour with a sold out show in their hometown, versatile Orlando rock ‘n’ roll outfit The Groove Orient shows no signs of slowing down! The band has just released their first wave of Fall Tour dates, including Widespread Panic after parties, festival appearances at Pass The Good, Meeting of the MINDS, and Suwannee Hulaween, where they will be performing with stand­out vocalist Kaleigh Baker!  And to top it off, TGO & Baker will be joining Post Funk powerhouse, The Main Squeeze, in early October for a string of shows throughout the Sunshine State of Florida.To get you ready for the groove, the band has shared two exclusive videos with us. Watch them perform “Sammy A” and “Stingray Shuffle” from their summer tour, below.last_img read more

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All things baseball

first_imgAfter leading a moment of silence in memory of the Red Sox’s disappointing season, Jill Lepore broke the quiet by picking a fight over the legacy of Hall of Fame infielder Honus Wagner.“History is the art of making an argument by telling a story about dead people,” said Lepore, the David Woods Kemper ’41 Professor of American History in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS). “Here is my argument: [Wagner] was the greatest shortstop of all time. Anything social scientists say has to be proven with evidence.”Combining hearsay, archival materials, baseball cards, and statistics, Lepore demonstrated how researching the Pittsburgh Pirates infielder’s career is similar to a historian’s pursuit of truth.Lepore led off a murderers’ row lineup of six Harvard professors for “GenEd at Bat: A Discussion of America’s Favorite Pastime with the Faculty of Gen Ed” at Science Center A on Tuesday.Combining hearsay, archival materials, baseball cards, and statistics, Harvard Professor Jill Lepore demonstrated how researching the Pittsburgh Pirates infielder’s career is similar to a historian’s pursuit of truth.Moderated by Jay Harris, dean of undergraduate education and the Harry Austryn Wolfson Professor of Jewish Studies, the panel aimed to tie Gen Ed history, government, science, and law curricula with America’s beloved national game.“Everything you need to know in life you can learn from baseball,” said Harris.The heart of Harris’ order dealt with baseball’s connection to social and political issues.Batting second, Robin Kelsey used a treasure trove of colorful slides from his baseball card collection — spanning the 1950s through the 1970s — to reveal parallels among portrait art, photography, pop art, and the game.Kelsey, Shirley Carter Burden Professor of Photography and director of graduate studies in the History of Art and Architecture Department at Harvard, said cards captured the art of their time. Cards in the 1950s portrayed players against solid color backdrops like religious icons, while an early 1970s Jeff Burroughs (of the Texas Rangers) could be a Peter Max knock-off.Yet, Kelsey, who received a Ph.D. in 2000 from Harvard’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS), said, they “were more real and inspiring than the people I interacted with day-to-day.”Michael Klarman, Kirkland and Ellis Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, said baseball allowed African-Americans to shine even as they suffered stereotypes in the wider world.“Baseball is a sport of individual achievement,” said Klarman, clad in a blue Red Sox cap and red-and-white Daisuke Matsuzaka jersey. “[You can] refute stereotypes with objective data.”He also drew parallels between the black baseball vanguard and civil rights pioneers — both risked life and safety to win equality, said Klarman. Jackie Robinson, who broke baseball’s color barrier in 1947 for the Brooklyn Dodgers, was hit, deliberately spiked, and faced death threats.Andrew Gordon, Lee and Juliet Folger Fund Professor of History and director of the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, discussed cultural differences through the prism of Matsuzaka’s first-year struggles with the Sox.Dice-K blamed his losing on yielding to a Sox request to alter rigorous workouts that he believed were uniquely Japanese. The Sox dismissed this excuse as “nonsense,” Gordon ’75, GSAS Ph.D. ’81, said.To Gordon, author of “Matsuzaka’s Unknown Major League Revolution” about the pitcher’s rookie year, the answer is more complex. Decades ago, visiting Japanese ballplayers borrowed American spring training routines and transformed them to fit their culture.“Cultures are not like billiard balls [hitting each other],” Gordon said. “They are dynamic and interactive; they are fluid and shifting.Steve Levitsky, professor of government and a New York Mets fan, talked about the role of baseball in relations between the United States and Latin America.“Baseball is a product of social and commercial ties,” Levitsky said. “America needs to strengthen ties. Baseball is one such tie.”Donner Professor of Science John Huth deployed an array of props — a fan, a plastic globe, a Wiffle ball, and a leather whip — to demonstrate the physics behind the “magical moment between the time a ball leaves a pitcher’s hand and when it crosses the plate.”A fastball relies on some basic physics, Huth said: fluid dynamics (the movement of air around an object) and the snap of a leather whip (low mass equals high velocity) to blow a batter away. The Magnus effect (lift and spin of an object) explains the curve of a curveball.A knuckleballer’s trick is to get rid of spin, Huth said, by eliminating the whiplike arm motion and throwing the ball like a javelin.Watching a video of Red Sox pitcher Tim Wakefield’s knuckleball float across the plate past a perplexed batter, Huth said nonchalantly: “A perfect strike.”With the audience watching a video of Red Sox pitcher Tim Wakefield’s knuckleball float across the plate past a perplexed batter, Donner Professor of Science John Huth said nonchalantly: “A perfect strike.”last_img read more

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Badgers look to jack up SDSU

first_imgThe Badgers hope to get their first win of the season against the Jackrabbits after a disappointing 0-3-1 start to the 2010 campaign.[/media-credit]A year ago, the Wisconsin women’s soccer team might have just brushed off a 0-3-1 start to the season.That kind of mentality can surely spare a team from feeling pressure and urgency, but without a little extra push, it can also flounder in all the excuses.“One of the difficult things was a lot of players put the results off on playing good teams,” head coach Paula Wilkins said of the 2009 season. “We had to take a step back and tell them that that rationalization is sort of a cop out.”It would be easy to do that this year after losses against two top-five ranked teams, not to mention that none of those games were against Big Ten opponents.So how are the Badgers handling their misfortune this year?“I think the team is definitely under pressure by ourselves to win,” freshman Kodee Williams said. “We need to win. We have to win and we will win for sure.”“Obviously, nobody likes to lose and we definitely shouldn’t have started off our season this way but we have a good attitude going into this weekend and it should be exciting.”The Badgers begin the mission to straighten out their season today as they welcome South Dakota State (2-1-1) to the McClimon Soccer Complex in what will be the first meeting between the two schools.While the Badgers look to pick themselves back up, the Jackrabbits enter the match on a two-game win streak. Last week, SDSU put back a clutch game-winner in double overtime against Nevada before sailing away with a 3-0 victory versus Montana.After beginning the year 0-1-1 with senior Dani Pappas at goalkeeper, the Jackrabbits have opted to use freshman Elisa Stamatakis in the net over the last two games. After allowing two goals in her debut, Stamatakis managed to post a clean sheet in her second outing against Montana.After scoring just one goal in its first four games, an inexperienced goalkeeper should provide an excellent opportunity for the Wisconsin offense to escape its goal drought. Aiding that campaign is junior forward Laurie Nosbusch, who returned to practice this week after receiving limited time before last week’s Washington Tournament.Wilkins believes Nosbusch’s return to form will open up an offense she says has gone through a shortfall of initiative and ideas.“I think we need to keep the ball more and get a little bit of a spark or intensity up there just to take the extra step and put [ourselves] into position to score,” she said. I don’t think we’re doing that exactly yet – we’re sort of waiting for other people to make decisions.”UW spent the last week working on maintaining possession in the final third of the field as well as developing ideas to get numbers in the box.But for Nosbusch, one of the biggest factors in the offense’s production rests with its mentality – specifically, excitement.“We haven’t had too many scoring opportunities so far so I think the one thing we really need to work on this week is getting people excited, getting people forward and getting people in the box to be desperate to score a goal,” she said.On the opposite side of the field, Wilkins remains pleased that the defense has only allowed one goal in the run of play, but a remedy is sorely needed to prevent goals coming off of set pieces, as four of the five goals allowed have occurred in such instances.That remedy: Avoiding fouls that stem from sloppy play in the second half – which means fitness has become somewhat of a concern.All five of Wisconsin’s conceded goals have occurred in the second period of play. The defense will need to remain as tireless as possible in order to repel a surging Jackrabbit offense that has converted all six of its goals in just the last two games.For the Badgers, though, Wilkins said the focus of this past week remained fixed on their own team and a little less on the opponent. Once UW’s dull edges are sharpened, the Badgers expect to escape the hole they’ve found themselves in.“For the most part in practice this week we’re just going to focus on ourselves,” Wilkins said. “We need to get a little bit better around the box and create more opportunities and I think if we do that then we’re really going to give some teams some problems.”last_img read more

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Provisional Spain squad includes uncapped duo

first_imgUncapped duo Ander Iturraspe and Daniel Carvajal have both included in Vicente del Bosque’s 30-man Spain World Cup squad, along with Fernando Torres, but Real Madrid pair Alvaro Arbeloa and Isco have been omitted from the provisional panel.Arbeloa was part of the Spain sides that have won back-to-back European Championships and the World Cup in the last six years.Carvajal earned a spot after impressing following his return to Madrid last summer, while Athletic Bilbao midfielder Iturraspe is the other player in the squad yet to make a senior appearance for Spain.Highly-rated Madrid playmaker Isco is among those who have missed out, as well as Tottenham striker Roberto Soldado, who has had a poor first season at White Hart Lane.Chelsea striker Torres, who scored in the finals of both Euro 2008 and Euro 2012, has not had the best of campaigns either and has been absent from the last few Spain squads, but he has won a berth.Aside from Torres, Del Bosque has included eight more Barclays Premier League players, including Liverpool goalkeeper Jose Reina, who has spent the season on loan at Napoli. The others are Manchester City trio David Silva, Jesus Navas and Alvaro Negredo, Manchester United pair David De Gea and Juan Mata, Chelsea’s Cesar Azpilicueta and Arsenal’s Santi Cazorla.The defending champions have included seven players from Barcelona and four each from Champions League finalists Real and Atletico Madrid.Del Bosque will announce his final 23-man squad on 25 May.Spain have a tough group in Brazil, with the Netherlands, the team they beat in the final four years ago, Chile and Australia alongside them in Group D.Goalkeepers: Iker Casillas (Real Madrid), Jose Reina (Liverpool), David De Gea (Manchester United) Defenders: Cesar Azpilicueta (Chelsea), Gerard Pique (Barcelona), Sergio Ramos (Real Madrid), Jordi Alba (Barcelona), Alberto Moreno (Sevilla), Javi Martinez (Bayern Munich), Raul Albiol (Napoli), Juanfran (Atletico Madrid), Daniel Carvajal (Real Madrid)Midfielders: Xavi (Barcelona), Xabi Alonso (Real Madrid), Andres Iniesta (Barcelona), Koke (Atletico Madrid), Sergio Busquets (Barcelona), Santi Cazorla (Arsenal), Ander Iturraspe (Athletic Bilbao), Cesc Fabregas (Barcelona), Thiago Alcantara (Bayern Munich), Juan Mata (Manchester United), David Silva (Manchester City)Forwards: Pedro (Barcelona), Jesus Navas (Manchester City), Diego Costa (Atletico Madrid), David Villa (Atletico Madrid), Fernando Torres (Chelsea), Alvaro Negredo (Manchester City), Fernando Llorente (Juventus)last_img read more

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