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Presidential push may kickstart Indonesian transition from coal to renewables

first_imgPresidential push may kickstart Indonesian transition from coal to renewables FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Mongabay:President Joko Widodo has reportedly expressed his intention to wean Indonesia off coal, in a move that runs counter to his own administration’s stated policy of increasing the country’s reliance on the fossil fuel.The president made the announcement at a July 8 cabinet meeting, according to Siti Nurbaya Bakar, the minister of environment and forestry. “[T]he president emphasized that we must develop the energy sector with a focus on renewable energy,” Siti said at a recent event in Jakarta. “Therefore, the president has explicitly asked to ‘start reducing the use of coal.’”If the administration follows through on the statement with concrete policies to phase out coal use, this could signal the beginning of a transition to renewable energy for Indonesia, the largest energy consumer in South East Asia and one of the biggest consumers of coal in the world, analysts say.But any meaningful change will have to start with an overhaul of the electricity procurement plan, or RUPTL, by the state-owned utility, PLN. At present, the RUPTL calls for increasing the absolute figure for renewable power generation over the long term, but shrinking its share of the overall energy mix in favor of more coal-fired electricity.The ideal plan would have to offer both fiscal and non-fiscal incentives that would lower the price of renewable power to make it competitive with coal, said Elrika Hamdi, an analyst at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA). “What’s also important is that the policies taken should be consistent and in effect for a long time in order to give assurance to investors and funders,” she added.Indonesia is currently one of the world’s biggest CO2 emitters, most of it from deforestation and land-use change. However, emissions from the energy sector are poised to dominate in the near future as Indonesia’s demand for electricity continues to rise. The country’s energy consumption growth is among the fastest in the world, with coal accounting for nearly 60 percent of the energy mix in 2018. Its energy policy therefore has important implications not just for the country’s climate future, but also for global efforts to achieve cuts under the Paris Agreement.More: Indonesia’s president signals a transition away from coal powerlast_img read more

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USC buildings lead in earthquake preparedness

first_imgIn the past 20 years, USC has strengthened all its unreinforced masonry buildings on campus in an effort to ensure earthquake safety.“USC has been pretty proactive, but the big worry is the rest of L.A. has a lot of concrete buildings that no one is doing anything with,” said Gregg Brandow, professor of engineering practice in USC’s Sonny Astani Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.Data compiled by the University of California show that there are  nearly 1,500 concrete buildings in Los Angeles that could be at risk in a major earthquake.Berkeley released its research to the public on Jan. 25. The list included all concrete buildings in Los Angeles constructed before the 1976 building code. This building code required ductile detailing of the reinforcing bars in concrete to provide additional strength to the structures. The university researchers gave the list to Los Angeles officials and released a copy to the Los Angeles Times in response to a public records request.“We’re interested in running an analysis of earthquake losses,” said Jonathan Stewart, co-principal investigator of the study. “We’re getting a sense for the scale of impact in dollars and lives lost to craft public policy to change the problem.” Stewart is also the department chair of civil and environmental engineering at UCLA.The study listed seven buildings located on the USC campus. Yet Associate Senior Vice President for Campus Development and Facilities Management Joe Back said that three of the addresses are inaccurate, and the remaining four have been inspected and meet seismic standards.The four buildings named were Parkside Apartments, Parkside Residential Building, Fluor Tower and United University Church, the last of which is not owned by USC. Back said Parkside Residential Building is located at the 920 West 37th Street location which the study listed; The description given in the L.A. Times article, however, identifies a smaller, one-story building which was demolished.Parkside Residential Building is one of the newest buildings on campus and meets seismic standards, Back said. Additionally, Parkside Apartments has already received a seismic upgrade, and Fluor Tower has been inspected and determined to meet seismic standards as well, he said.“All of our occupied buildings meet seismic standards,” Back wrote in an email. “USC continuously looks to identify upgrade opportunities in our buildings and executes a significant amount of work each year that includes upgrades in seismic performance, disabled access, heating/cooling systems and technology.”Stewart said the study addressed the fact that the list might not be 100 percent accurate. The researchers have not made any conclusions about the safety of the buildings.Stewart said the purpose of Berkeley’s study was to raise awareness of buildings that would be a potential threat if a large earthquake were to strike, as well as force the city to implement policies that will address this problem.“It will be interesting to see whether any sort of policy initiative is taken by the city of Los Angeles to do something about the problem,” Stewart said. “We saw just last week that Santa Monica funded a study to do a similar catalog of buildings. That’s a good sign. We would like to see cities taking this problem seriously.”The researchers’ data shows that it is crucial to update the buildings that cause a potential threat because of the possibility for extreme damage and lost lives. If a 7.15 magnitude earthquake occurred on the Puente Hills fault beneath Downtown Los Angeles, It could cause $20 billion worth of damage and 300 to 2,000 casualties depending on the time of day, Stewart said.In order to do more research on the topic, James Anderson, professor of civil engineering and environmental engineering at the Viterbi School of Engineering, submitted an application for a grant which will allow researchers to look at the various buildings in question to predict what the consequences would be of an earthquake.“We want to create a tool to analytically predict what the consequence would be for these buildings,” Anderson said. “For example, three years ago in Mexico City, there were buildings reviewed by engineers that reported no sign of damage, and yet they collapsed, so that simulates a need for an analytical tool that can quantify this.”Thomas Jordan, professor of earth sciences at the Dornsife School of Letters, Arts and Sciences and director of the Southern California Earthquake Center, cited the importance of this type of research.“We’ve been proactive at USC, but seismically it’s been quiet in Southern California for a long time,” Jordan said. Since we can’t know when another will happen, we worry that whole region might wake up and it might not be just one, but a sequence of major earthquakes, which is a concern.”last_img read more

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Mason City man sentenced to ten years on federal firearms charges

first_imgCEDAR RAPIDS — A Mason City man has been sentenced to 10 years in prison on federal firearms charges. 33-year-old Daniel Solano pleaded guilty recently in US District Court in Cedar Rapids to possession of a firearm by a felon. He admitted to possessing seven firearms during May 2017 and committing the felony crime of reckless homicide in Cook County Illinois in July 2007. On May 12, 2017, Solano and others broke into a residence in Thompson and stole seven guns. District Judge C. J. Williams sentenced Solano on Tuesday to 120 months in prison, to be followed by a three-year term of supervised release.last_img

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STORM DESMOND: ALL DONEGAL JUNIOR LEAGUE MATCHES POSTPONED

first_imgPOSTPONED: ALL DONEGAL JUNIOR LEAGUE games have been postponed due to unrelenting weather currently afflicting the county.Storm Desmond has battered Donegal for over 24 hours now and shows no signs of stopping. The storm has caused devastating flooding all over Donegal – and many major roads are unpassable.The committee of the Donegal Junior League have decided to postpone ALL fixtures scheduled for tomorrow in all three of their leagues.Donegl Junior League PRO, Gary Foy issued the following statement via Facebook earlier this evening.Gary Foy wrote, “UPDATE!! The Donegal Junior League have decided to postponed all League games scheduled for tomorrow (Sunday). That is to say the Premier, 1st and 2nd Divisions of the Donegal League.“All Junior Cup Fixtures will be decided in the morning.“I will keep all informed of any further developments.The USL fixture between Letterkenny Rovers and Swilly Rovers at the AURA remains on – but there will be a pitch inspection at 8am tomorrow morning.STORM DESMOND: ALL DONEGAL JUNIOR LEAGUE MATCHES POSTPONED was last modified: December 5th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:newsSportlast_img read more

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