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Preach the Gospel at all times. Use words when necessary.

first_imgThat adage is attributed to St. Francis.  It is one of my favorites, as it reminds us that we can say anything we like, but it is our actions that tell our true story and make a real difference.We have the same opportunity to preach the “credit union gospel” in our communities with our actions. The benefits of doing so positively impacts our employees, members and the broader community.  Employees report that they “get” more from these opportunities than they “give” – making them feel good about their job and their employer. Credit unions benefit from positive association with the cause.  And, obviously, the community benefits from the credit union’s support.Many credit unions already encourage its employees to support causes, either individually or those selected by the credit union. Some other ways credit unions can support their communities beyond what is traditionally done include:Publicity – Your credit union is a huge publicity machine.  You can put that machine to use to support a community organization or cause.  At minimal cost, you can promote the cause on social media, your website, on your IVR system, and in branches. This promotion may be exactly what your local organization needs to break through to the next level.Foundations – Many credit unions have launched non-profit foundations.  When structured as 501(c)(3) organizations, these foundations provide benefits with both inflows and outflows.  Supporters can make contributions to the foundation and benefit with a tax deduction, all while doing good. When deploying funds into communities, funds can be coupled with your lending products to provide lending solutions that you otherwise may not be able to provide.  I’ve seen some very creative combinations in all areas of lending – consumer, mortgage and commercial.Participation in city government – While many credit unions are active in their local chambers, they can broaden their reach – and impact – by participating in city government. Opportunities include volunteering (e.g. adopt-a-highway), serving on a commission (such as planning commission), or running for city council. Preaching the “credit union gospel” through our actions benefits so many, both inside and outside the credit union.  I encourage you to continue preaching the credit union gospel. And, if you have found unique ways to support your community, I’d love to hear about them and what they’ve done for you and your community. 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Joe Karlin Joe Karlin has worked with or at credit unions his entire career.  Starting as a CPA with Deloitte and Touche, he audited credit unions, corporates, and leagues.  Joe spent nearly … Detailslast_img read more

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Tanzania to get $100 mln World Bank loan to improve governance

first_imgTanzania will receive a $100 million loan from the World Bank’s International Development Association (IDA) Tanzania will receive a $100 million loan from the World Bank’s International Development Association (IDA)Tanzania will receive a $100 million loan from the World Bank’s International Development Association (IDA) to help improve governance in the east African country.Businesses have long complained corruption is one of the main reasons for the high cost of doing business in Tanzania. The loan would be aimed at increasing transparency and accountability in governance and improving public financial management, said Philippe Dongier, the World Bank’s country director for Tanzania.The project will also help promote budget credibility and execution through better cash management, public investment management and procurement to improve health, education and water supply services to the poor, the Bank said.Tanzania is estimated to have more than 53.2 trillion cubic feet of gas reserves off its southern coast, but its energy sector has long been dogged by allegations of graft and other problems. Graft claims led to the suspension of budget support by Western donors in October.last_img read more

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COLUMN: Rose Bowl still tastes sweet one week later

first_imgIt’s now over a week since it happened. The college football season also officially ended Monday, after Clemson completed a comeback that rivals even ’SC’s. We’ve even had a couple of Trojans declare for the NFL draft already, adding a bittersweet touch to an otherwise perfectly rosy season. It’s now perfectly acceptable for Trojan fans to start looking ahead to the 2017 season. As sports editor Julia Poe pointed out last week, there are an endless number of reasons to already be excited about what the program has next in store. Personally, though, I’m still soaking in the Trojans’ epic Rose Bowl victory. Maybe it’s my overly nostalgic inner senior showing again, and I’ll officially transition into full-on 2017 hype soon enough. But for the time being, I’ll still be reminiscing on the most recent win more than I’ll be thinking about the next game. I don’t need to rehash any specific moments from the game one more time — I’m sure you watched it, too. But the significance of USC’s performance against Penn State is something that I still think is worth talking about because it truly was remarkable within the context of USC’s recent program history. For those of us Trojan fans who were spoiled and grew up right at the ascent of the USC Golden Age — basically, anyone who is a current senior and got a Rose Bowl win as the cherry on top of our undergraduate football experience — we got to see a lot of USC victories in major bowl games. Six, to be exact. In fact, my first real memory of watching a USC football game while being old enough to appreciate and be invested in the implications of the result was the 2003 Orange Bowl, when the Carson Palmer-led Trojans resoundingly beat an overmatched Big Ten opponent in Iowa. Throw in another Orange Bowl victory, plus an absurd four Rose Bowl wins — all in a seven-year span — and that’s more BCS bowl victories than I can count on one hand.Every single one was by double digits. Every. Single. One. In fact, each one of those six bowl wins was by at least two touchdowns. Iowa in the ’03 Orange Bowl was 38-17; Michigan in the ’04 Rose Bowl was 28-14; Oklahoma in the ’05 Orange Bowl was a glorious 55-19; Michigan Rose Bowl Round No. 2 in ’07 was 32-18; Illinois was just happy to be there in a 49-17 ’08 Rose Bowl mismatch, and the ’09 Rose Bowl was another sound 32-18 win for the Trojans over Penn State. Of course, the one bowl loss in that span is arguably the most famous out of any of the games  — yep, still hurts — but a mere single exception in that span doesn’t take away from how remarkable that run was. So going into the Rose Bowl, there was a tiny bit of a feeling that maybe, finally, USC was due for a regression in its unheard-of recent bowl success. But that was quickly overtaken by the old Arrogant Nation sky-high confidence. USC had gotten its vintage swagger back. By the end of the season, the Trojans could walk into any stadium in the country with the unequivocal belief that they would win — because they were USC, and they probably would. Throw in some pre-season rankings bias on my part, resulting in some skepticism that Penn State really was on Michigan or Ohio State’s level and capable of running with the Trojans, and my confidence was through the roof. Not that USC would find a way to win against Penn State, but that USC was just definitively better than Penn State, like it was against anyone else. The outcome would never be in doubt. Why would it be?The term “Fight On” has been a brand of the school, and especially the football program, for as long as I can remember. But in my generation, it was not an actual call to battle. It was just a trademark, the signature USC salute, like a “Hook ’Em” at Texas or a “War Eagle” at Auburn. It never meant what the literal message conveys. It never meant anything. We just said it. We all did, all the time. But USC football during the peak of the Pete Carroll’s dynasty never symbolized the comeback spirit. The Trojans weren’t the epitome of the “never give up” mentality. USC football was just better than everyone. The offense was faster, the defense was stronger, the coach was cooler, the band was louder and the team was just better. I can’t remember a single time during that seven-season stretch when the Trojans didn’t go into a game favored. They didn’t need to come back. They just won. That’s what makes this Rose Bowl victory so special. It wasn’t just a Hollywood ending, the conclusion to a storybook season. It’s a coming of age journey for a program and its fan base. If anything, USC football’s reputation during its post-sanction rebuilding phase was the opposite of fighting on, noted for as many blown leads in Utah and surrendered Hail Marys as upsets over Stanford. When head coach Clay Helton talked about how his players “fought on” all of the Rose Bowl and all season, this was really the first time that term was actually warranted to describe this program. Now I know that the ultimate success of a program in American sports depends on championships. If you ain’t first, you’re last. That will always be the expectation with a program like USC, as it should. But there is still plenty of pride to take in winning a game known as the “Granddaddy of Them All.” Before we start mentally chasing after the next one, let’s soak in this one. So until at least Signing Day, I don’t want to talk about how high USC will project in the preseason AP Poll, how easily redshirt freshman quarterback Sam Darnold will run away with the Heisman or how much we want junior Adoree’ Jackson to stay for one more year. OK, fine, I’ll admit it, I’ll probably cheat on that one and check Twitter incessantly until he announces, but I would be just fine with him ending his Trojan career on a Rose Bowl win.When I walked into the bookstore on Monday to get my supplies for the semester, they were still looping highlights of sophomore kicker Matt Boermeester’s game-winning field goal to the audio of Pete Arbogast’s radio call. And there I was, standing in line, buying two legal pads, and getting the chills. Luke Holthouse is a senior majoring in policy, planning and development and print and digital journalism. His column, “Holthouse Party,” runs on Wednesdays.last_img read more

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Tipp clubs’ UBL matches postponed

first_imgCashel’s match against Corinthians in Galway has been called off because of the bad weather in the West.Nenagh Ormond’s home clash with Naas has also been postponed – the pitch at New Ormond Park is unplayable following the heavy overnight rain.last_img

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1400 nursing homes get lower Medicare ratings because of staffing concerns

first_img This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Jul 30 2018Medicare has lowered its star ratings for staffing levels in 1 in 11 of the nation’s nursing homes — almost 1,400 of them — because they either had inadequate numbers of registered nurses or failed to provide payroll data that proved they had the required nursing coverage, federal records released last week show.Medicare only recently began collecting and publishing payroll data on the staffing of nursing homes as required by the Affordable Care Act of 2010, rather than relying as it had before on the nursing homes’ own unverified reports.The payroll records revealed lower overall staffing levels than homes had disclosed, particularly among registered nurses. Those are the highest-trained caregivers required to be in a nursing home, and they supervise other nurses and aides. Medicare mandates that every facility have a registered nurse working at least eight hours every day.”It’s a real positive that they actually are taking the payroll-based system seriously, that they’re using it to punish those nursing homes that either aren’t reporting staffing or those that are below the federal limit,” said David Grabowski, a professor of health care policy at Harvard Medical School. “Could they do more? Sure, but I think it’s a really good start.”Nursing home industry officials have acknowledged that some facilities are struggling to meet the new payroll reporting requirements. Katie Smith Sloan, president of LeadingAge, an association of nonprofit providers of aging services including nearly 2,000 nursing homes, said the lowered star ratings were disappointing and attributed them largely to a workforce shortage.”Our members are battling on multiple fronts to recruit and retain all types of qualified staff, and nurses in particular,” she said in a statement.Medicare rates nursing homes on a five-star system, and the homes’ failures to either keep the facilities consistently staffed with registered nurses or to provide the data to prove they were doing so led the government to give its lowest rating for staffing to 1,387 of the nation’s 15,616 skilled nursing facilities, according to a Kaiser Health News analysis of the latest data released by Medicare. They all received one star out of a possible five on July 25, when Medicare updated its Nursing Home Compare website, replacing the first ratings based on payroll data issued in April.In footnotes on the site, Medicare said those homes either lacked a registered nurse for “a high number of days” over three months, provided data the government couldn’t verify or didn’t supply their payroll data at all. The downgraded homes reported seven or more days without any registered nurses, the analysis found.For roughly half of the homes, the downgrades lowered their overall star ratings, which are the measures displayed most prominently on the site. But some of the homes saw their overall ratings stay the same or even rise, buoyed by their scores on other quality measures. Seventy-nine are still rated with a coveted five stars.While the Kaiser Health News analysis found substantially lower average staffing of nurses and aides at for-profit facilities than at nonprofits and government-owned homes, the number of downgraded nursing homes was roughly proportionally divided among the three categories, indicating an industry-wide issue with staffing by registered nurses in particular.Related StoriesSocial Security error jeopardizes Medicare coverage for 250,000 seniorsNursing home care prices rise faster than other medical care and consumer pricesStudy: Stress experienced by premature infants can carry on throughout their adult lifeMedicare concedes that because the payroll system is geared toward reporting hourly work, salaried staff may not always be reflected correctly, especially if they were working overtime. But Medicare had warned the nursing homes in April that the downgrades would be coming if facilities continued to show no registered nurses on duty. The agency noted it has been preparing nursing homes since 2015 for the new payroll system.”We’ve just begun to leverage this new information to strengthen transparency and enforcement with the goals of improved patient safety and health outcomes,” the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services said in a statement.The new payroll data, analyzed by Kaiser Health News, showed that for-profit nursing homes averaged 16 percent fewer staff than did nonprofits, even after accounting for differences in the needs of residents. The biggest difference was in the number of registered nurses: At the average nonprofit, there was one RN for every 28 residents, but at the average for-profit, there was only one RN for every 43 residents. Researchers have repeatedly found lower staffing in for-profit facilities, which make up 70 percent of the industry.The data also revealed that nursing homes have large fluctuations in staffing. The average nursing home had one licensed nurse caring for as few as 17 residents or as many as 33, depending on the day. On the best-staffed days, each certified nursing assistant or other aide cared for nine residents, but on the worst-staffed days, each aide was responsible for 16 residents.Weekend staffing was particularly sparse. On weekends on average, there were 11 percent fewer nurses providing direct care and 8 percent fewer aides.KHN’s coverage of these topics is supported by John A. Hartford Foundation and The SCAN Foundation Jordan Rau: [email protected], @JordanRauElizabeth Lucas: [email protected], @eklucaslast_img read more

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