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EU member states push back against European regulatory levy

first_imgThe Commission had also called for the establishment of an executive board with permanent members, but this also failed to make it into the Council’s proposal. In addition, the Council scrapped from its position a provision for the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA) – one of the three European financial supervisory agencies (ESAs) – to be allowed to disclose how individual occupational pension funds or insurers fare under sector stress tests. In a statement, the Council said its general approach ensured a “key role” for national regulators within the ESAs’ governance structure, adding that “no decision should be taken against the will of a majority of national supervisors”. EU member states have rejected proposals from the European Commission that would have extended the European pension regulator’s powers and introduced an industry levy to fund the bloc’s financial regulators.The EU Council today published its compromise agreement on proposals to reform the bloc’s financial supervision system, which crucially did not include Commission suggestions that had worried European occupational pension funds. The Council’s position would limit the extension of powers put forward by the Commission proposal, which was presented in September 2017. For example, the Commission had proposed the introduction of industry contributions to fund the EU’s finance watchdogs, but this did not feature in the Council’s proposal.A final version of the supervision reforms must be agreed between the Council, the Commission and the European Parliament, all of which have put forward their own version of the initial text. Source: European CouncilCommission vice-president Valdis Dombrovskis and Eugen-Orlando Teodorovici, Romanian public finance minister, at a press conference following a meeting of EU finance ministers on 12 FebruaryMatthies Verstegen, senior policy adviser at PensionsEurope, the Brussels-based European association of national pension fund bodies, said the Council had adopted a “sensible” approach.“Europe’s pensions landscape is very diverse, so we welcome the position that national supervisors should retain a strong role in EIOPA’s management structure,” he said.“We also think it’s better that the ESAs are funded through the EU budget and member states contributions than through fees from financial institutions. Pension funds are not directly supervised by the ESAs and therefore shouldn’t pay into their budgets.”PensionsEurope previously expressed concerns about the Commission’s proposals.At a press conference after a meeting of EU finance ministers today, Valdis Dombrovskis, Commission vice-president, said the compromise reached did not have “the same high level of ambition” as the Commission’s initial proposal, but it was “as good as it can get when we needed to compose with a number of diverging views”.Next stepsNegotiations between the European Parliament and the Council are set to begin this Thursday with the first trilogue.The Parliament’s economic and monetary affairs committee adopted its position, which is more aligned with the Commission’s proposal than the Council’s, last month.The Commission is keen for a political agreement to be reached before the European Parliament elections in May.last_img read more

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Syracuse aims to snap 4-game losing streak at Iowa State tournament

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 6, 2012 at 8:59 pm Contact Austin: [email protected] A calm and confident Emily Betteridge gave no excuses for Syracuse’s four-game losing streak. Instead, the sophomore setter said the team needs to work hard to overcome the challenges ahead.“We have a tough out-of-conference schedule,” Betteridge said. “We are working out the kinks, trying to get together and we’ve got some new girls on the court.”After three wins to open the season, the Orange dropped its next four games in Nebraska, falling to Creighton, Denver and No. 21 Kansas State at the Bluejay Invitational and Nebraska-Omaha in a separate road game. SU failed to win a single set in all four games.Syracuse (3-4) will look to get back on track this weekend when it takes on Iowa (5-2), Eastern Washington (0-8) and Iowa State (3-3) at the Iowa State tournament. The Orange opens the tournament against the Hawkeyes Friday at 10 a.m. In head coach Leonid Yelin’s first season at SU, the team is still trying to develop an identity.“I think we’re trying to do some new things as a team,” junior middle blocker Lindsay McCabe said. “We’ve tried a few different systems. Nothing in particular but just trying to get used to each other on the court and hopefully this weekend that gets better.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textMcCabe said the team has worked on team and individual drills to get better. Practice also serves as a chance for the players to continue developing into their roles.Yelin tries to make practices like game situations so the team can know what to expect when it hits the court for an official game. Betteridge said the players appreciate Yelin’s approach, which forces them to work hard to improve every day.Betteridge also said challenging practices are essential for game preparation.“I think it’s really important to have hard practices and have it game-like,” she said. “That’s the closest thing you’re going to get when you’re playing against someone on the other side of the net.”McCabe echoed Betteridge’s beliefs on practice. She said the team’s performance in games is a reflection of how it trains.“I think it’s extremely important,” she said. “The best we can do is work as hard as we can at practice and make it game situation-like.”Betteridge she and her teammates are working hard to prepare for SU’s game against Iowa Friday.After losing four straight games, the Orange is focused on the future. The team still has 23 games to figure out its identity.For now, the players are just fighting through the slump day by day at practice.“We’re just working as a team,” Betteridge said. “Working hard and trying to push to the next game. We are excited.” Commentslast_img read more

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COLUMN: Rose Bowl still tastes sweet one week later

first_imgIt’s now over a week since it happened. The college football season also officially ended Monday, after Clemson completed a comeback that rivals even ’SC’s. We’ve even had a couple of Trojans declare for the NFL draft already, adding a bittersweet touch to an otherwise perfectly rosy season. It’s now perfectly acceptable for Trojan fans to start looking ahead to the 2017 season. As sports editor Julia Poe pointed out last week, there are an endless number of reasons to already be excited about what the program has next in store. Personally, though, I’m still soaking in the Trojans’ epic Rose Bowl victory. Maybe it’s my overly nostalgic inner senior showing again, and I’ll officially transition into full-on 2017 hype soon enough. But for the time being, I’ll still be reminiscing on the most recent win more than I’ll be thinking about the next game. I don’t need to rehash any specific moments from the game one more time — I’m sure you watched it, too. But the significance of USC’s performance against Penn State is something that I still think is worth talking about because it truly was remarkable within the context of USC’s recent program history. For those of us Trojan fans who were spoiled and grew up right at the ascent of the USC Golden Age — basically, anyone who is a current senior and got a Rose Bowl win as the cherry on top of our undergraduate football experience — we got to see a lot of USC victories in major bowl games. Six, to be exact. In fact, my first real memory of watching a USC football game while being old enough to appreciate and be invested in the implications of the result was the 2003 Orange Bowl, when the Carson Palmer-led Trojans resoundingly beat an overmatched Big Ten opponent in Iowa. Throw in another Orange Bowl victory, plus an absurd four Rose Bowl wins — all in a seven-year span — and that’s more BCS bowl victories than I can count on one hand.Every single one was by double digits. Every. Single. One. In fact, each one of those six bowl wins was by at least two touchdowns. Iowa in the ’03 Orange Bowl was 38-17; Michigan in the ’04 Rose Bowl was 28-14; Oklahoma in the ’05 Orange Bowl was a glorious 55-19; Michigan Rose Bowl Round No. 2 in ’07 was 32-18; Illinois was just happy to be there in a 49-17 ’08 Rose Bowl mismatch, and the ’09 Rose Bowl was another sound 32-18 win for the Trojans over Penn State. Of course, the one bowl loss in that span is arguably the most famous out of any of the games  — yep, still hurts — but a mere single exception in that span doesn’t take away from how remarkable that run was. So going into the Rose Bowl, there was a tiny bit of a feeling that maybe, finally, USC was due for a regression in its unheard-of recent bowl success. But that was quickly overtaken by the old Arrogant Nation sky-high confidence. USC had gotten its vintage swagger back. By the end of the season, the Trojans could walk into any stadium in the country with the unequivocal belief that they would win — because they were USC, and they probably would. Throw in some pre-season rankings bias on my part, resulting in some skepticism that Penn State really was on Michigan or Ohio State’s level and capable of running with the Trojans, and my confidence was through the roof. Not that USC would find a way to win against Penn State, but that USC was just definitively better than Penn State, like it was against anyone else. The outcome would never be in doubt. Why would it be?The term “Fight On” has been a brand of the school, and especially the football program, for as long as I can remember. But in my generation, it was not an actual call to battle. It was just a trademark, the signature USC salute, like a “Hook ’Em” at Texas or a “War Eagle” at Auburn. It never meant what the literal message conveys. It never meant anything. We just said it. We all did, all the time. But USC football during the peak of the Pete Carroll’s dynasty never symbolized the comeback spirit. The Trojans weren’t the epitome of the “never give up” mentality. USC football was just better than everyone. The offense was faster, the defense was stronger, the coach was cooler, the band was louder and the team was just better. I can’t remember a single time during that seven-season stretch when the Trojans didn’t go into a game favored. They didn’t need to come back. They just won. That’s what makes this Rose Bowl victory so special. It wasn’t just a Hollywood ending, the conclusion to a storybook season. It’s a coming of age journey for a program and its fan base. If anything, USC football’s reputation during its post-sanction rebuilding phase was the opposite of fighting on, noted for as many blown leads in Utah and surrendered Hail Marys as upsets over Stanford. When head coach Clay Helton talked about how his players “fought on” all of the Rose Bowl and all season, this was really the first time that term was actually warranted to describe this program. Now I know that the ultimate success of a program in American sports depends on championships. If you ain’t first, you’re last. That will always be the expectation with a program like USC, as it should. But there is still plenty of pride to take in winning a game known as the “Granddaddy of Them All.” Before we start mentally chasing after the next one, let’s soak in this one. So until at least Signing Day, I don’t want to talk about how high USC will project in the preseason AP Poll, how easily redshirt freshman quarterback Sam Darnold will run away with the Heisman or how much we want junior Adoree’ Jackson to stay for one more year. OK, fine, I’ll admit it, I’ll probably cheat on that one and check Twitter incessantly until he announces, but I would be just fine with him ending his Trojan career on a Rose Bowl win.When I walked into the bookstore on Monday to get my supplies for the semester, they were still looping highlights of sophomore kicker Matt Boermeester’s game-winning field goal to the audio of Pete Arbogast’s radio call. And there I was, standing in line, buying two legal pads, and getting the chills. Luke Holthouse is a senior majoring in policy, planning and development and print and digital journalism. His column, “Holthouse Party,” runs on Wednesdays.last_img read more

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Steven Gerrard set to face Sweden after scan showed no knee ligament damage

first_imgSteven Gerrard is set win his 100th England cap in Sweden on Wednesday after overcoming an injury scare.Gerrard had a precautionary scan after playing 90 minutes for Liverpool against Chelsea on Sunday, amid fears he had suffered medial ligament damage late in the game.But the scan revealed no damage and Gerrard is available to lead his country in Stockholm and become only the sixth England player to reach a century of caps.Only Bobby Moore, Peter Shilton, David Beckham, Bobby Charlton and Billy Wright have previously reached the landmark.A statement from the Football Association read: “Steven Gerrard has been cleared to travel with the England squad to Sweden having undergone a precautionary scan on Monday afternoon.“The England captain reported to the team hotel following Liverpool’s 1-1 draw with Chelsea and, having received positive news, is set to win his 100th cap against Sweden on Wednesday evening in Stockholm.” Manager Roy Hodgson has had to deal with a number of withdrawals prompting late calls for uncapped youngsters Wilfried Zaha and Carl Jenkinson.Five players, including Wayne Rooney, have pulled out of a trip that has caused consternation among Premier League managers keen to avoid their international stars becoming burned out.last_img read more

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NFL news and notes: Roquan Smith still away from Bears; Khalil Mack not sweating Raiders reunion

first_img Tyler Boyd: Bengals ’embarrassed’ by Steelers in prime time Michael Gallup injury update: Cowboys receiver (knee) ‘not ruled out’ vs. Packers Will a mysterious absence distract the Bears from the first ever NFL game played at the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium?We dive into the latest news regarding Roquan Smith and other headlines from around the league in this edition of NFL news and notes. Three things that matterRoquan Smith remains away from teamThe star linebacker was listed as a surprise inactive just before Sunday’s win over the Vikings for a “personal issue,” and it was rumored he had not been acting like himself around the team facilities in recent days. Bears coach Matt Nagy declined to provide any new details on the situation Monday.”He’s completely a personal issue,” he told reporters. “It’s for us something that we’re going to leave at that right now.” Related Newscenter_img When pushed for more information on Smith’s status and availability for Sunday, Nagy stood firm.”Personal issue,” he repeated. “I’m just going to say it was a personal issue. I’m not getting into anything else until… I’m just going to completely keep it at that.”Panthers place Kawann Short on season-ending IRThe team announced the All-Pro defensive lineman has a partially torn rotator cuff that initially was suffered in the team’s Week 2 loss to the Buccaneers. Short has spent the last two games on the sidelines, and will be staying put the rest of the year.”KK has done everything he could possibly do to try to play these past two games,” general manager Marty Hurney said, “but we have made the decision that it is in the best long-term interest of KK and the team that he undergo surgery to fix his shoulder and focus on his rehab and get ready for next season.”It’s another huge loss for the Panthers, who are already without quarterback Cam Newton, though Kyle Allen has gone 2-0 in his two starts this season, so Carolina has been able to stay afloat in his absence.Cowboys get ‘best news’ for Tyron Smith’s ankleThe Pro Bowl left tackle suffered a right ankle injury in Sunday’s loss to the Saints and needed to be carted off the sideline. While Jerry Jones said it’s “unlikely” Smith plays this week against the Packers, the Cowboys owner is optimistic he won’t be missing in action long.”We got the best news we could possibly get,” Jones said on 105.3 The Fan in Dallas. “We couldn’t have asked for better news. Looking forward to having him back out there quick.”Two things that don’t matterKhalil Mack hoped to be a Raider for lifeThe Bears linebacker thought he found his home in Oakland after the Raiders drafted him fifth overall in 2014, but a blockbuster trade last September changed that. Now, Mack is gearing up to face his former team for the first time since he was dealt.”That’s the expectation when you get drafted to a team: You want to be there for the long haul and bring championships and all those good things,” Mack said, per ESPN. “It’s the business side of it that doesn’t really let you do that.”It’s another game, man. It’s going to be a fun one because I know a few of the guys out there. But it’s going to be a good one. Can’t wait.”Miami vendor charged fan $724 for two beersOverpriced refreshments at stadiums are a joke, but this fan wasn’t laughing when his bank alerted him of the fraudulent transaction after his credit card was scanned to a personal card reader.Nathaniel Collier was arrested and will face two felony charges for his alleged scam at Miami’s Hard Rock Stadium during Sunday’s Dolphins-Chargers game, including third-degree grand theft and possession of a skimming device.Fortunately the fan received a refund, and Collier was fired by the independent contractor that hired him. One video you have to seeThe Rams offered fans a glimpse at the progress made on their new stadium.”This could only happen here in Los Angeles.”Our future home is coming along! 🙌 pic.twitter.com/Y0E1WEDG6G— Los Angeles Rams (@RamsNFL) October 1, 2019Tuesday’s tweet of the dayCould Dez Bryant swoop in to save one of the six remaining teams still in search of a win?I plan on it.. https://t.co/XpMCms4zxy— Dez Bryant (@DezBryant) October 1, 2019last_img read more

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