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Prep Sports Roundup: 1/25

first_img Tags: Roundup FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailBoys BasketballRegion 20TROPIC, Utah-Sergio Vasquez, Treyson Roberts and Westyn Clark had 9 points apiece and the Bryce Valley Mustangs smacked Wayne 49-34 Saturday in Region 20 boys basketball action. Tyrel Brian’s 9 points led the Badgers in defeat.MILFORD, Utah-Conner Chamberlain amassed 21 points as the Valley Buffaloes waxed Milford 57-44 in Region 20 boys basketball action Saturday. Zach Sherwood’s 25 points led the Tigers in defeat. January 25, 2020 /Sports News – Local Prep Sports Roundup: 1/25 Written by Brad Jameslast_img

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HMS Defender Gives a Taste of Life at Sea to Crew’s Family and Friends

first_img View post tag: and HMS Defender Gives a Taste of Life at Sea to Crew’s Family and Friends Share this article View post tag: UK View post tag: Friends June 24, 2013 View post tag: life View post tag: Naval View post tag: News by topic View post tag: sea Training & Education HMS Defender took families and friends to sea for the first time recently, showing off the ship and giving family members the chance to see what life is like at sea for their serving relations.The day included escorting HMS Edinburgh into harbour for the last time before she was decommissioned, full manoeuvrability and fire fighting demonstrations as well as tours of this state of the art ship.There were also activities for the younger sailor, the highlight of which was the chance to become the Bosun’s Mate, or in other words, the chance to ‘drive’ an 8000 ton warship at full speed!Leading Seaman Andrew Clough took his son Bradley (aged 6) to the bridge and gave him the wheel. Andrew said:“Bradley really enjoyed his time in the chair.“It’s a job I’ve done many times before, so for me it was really fun to be able to show him one of the things his Dad does for a living.“He has already said he wants to join the Navy too!”Lt Matt Bray RN, who organised the day’s activities, said:“The Ship’s Company rely so heavily on the support of their families and friends throughout the year, whether we’re in UK waters or deployed on operations around the world protecting the nation’s interests.“Days like today are a fantastic opportunity to repay our loved ones by treating them to an exciting day at sea, and give them a little taste of what it is we get up to when we’re away from home.”[mappress]Press Release, June 24, 2013; Image: Royal Navy View post tag: HMS View post tag: Family View post tag: gives View post tag: Defence View post tag: Defender View post tag: Navy View post tag: Taste Back to overview,Home naval-today HMS Defender Gives a Taste of Life at Sea to Crew’s Family and Friends View post tag: crewlast_img read more

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TKMS completes acquisition of Atlas Elektronik

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today thyssenkrupp Marine Systems completes acquisition of Atlas Elektronik Germany’s thyssenkrupp Marine Systems officially transformed into an integrated systems provider by completing the acquisition of Atlas Elektronik.The completion of the sale was announced by thyssenkrupp on April 3.The company previously owned a 51 percent stake in the Atlas Elektronik group and has now acquired the remaining 49 percent which were held by Airbus.“The global market environment is getting more and more complex and the requirements for integrated security concepts are rising,” Peter Feldhaus, CEO of thyssenkrupp Marine Systems said. “That’s why we are repositioning thyssenkrupp Marine Systems as an integrated systems provider to give us strategic advantages in the global market for submarines and naval surface vessels.”Following this acquisition, TKMS will be the sole German stakeholder in a company formed with Norwegian Kongsberg. The new, Norway-based company was formed following the Norwegian ministry of defense’s decision to award a submarine construction contract to TKMS.TKMS is to build four air-independent submarines to replace Norway’s existing six Ula-class submarines. View post tag: TKMS View post tag: Atlas Elektronik April 3, 2017center_img Share this article Authorities thyssenkrupp Marine Systems completes acquisition of Atlas Elektroniklast_img read more

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TORBIC, ANDREW J.

first_imgA funeral mass was held Aug. 11 at Our Lady of Czestochowa Church, Jersey City, for Andrew J. Torbic, formerly of Jersey City. He passed away July 29 at the James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, New York. He was the son of the late George J. Torbic and Helen (nee Moriak); brother of Ronald Torbic; uncle of Lisa Ann, Ronald Torbic, and Eric Torbic; great uncle of Ryan, Daniel and Steven Wall and Ashley Torbic. Andrew was a life-long member of the AMVETS.Services arranged by the Bromirski Funeral Home, Jersey City.last_img

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Warburtons makes most of muffins

first_imgWarburtons has launched new Toasting Muffins this month, and is encouraging retailers to take advantage of the cold weather by offering them to consumers. The muffins will be available in packs of four, and can be marketed as an alternative breakfast food. They have been gently forked around the middle, so can tear in two with ease.Muffins currently have a 12.5% share of the traditional breakfast sector, and the category is growing by 8.6% year-on-year in value terms, according to research by AC Nielsen (52 w/e 31.10.09).The launch will be supported by a media campaign, as well as consumer sampling and couponing activity.last_img

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University announces details of six semester policy

first_imgEarly in the fall semester of 2017, the Office of Residential Life announced a new policy mandating that, beginning with the class of 2022, students are required to live on campus for six semesters. Immediately following the announcement, students expressed concerns about the policy regarding the safety and security of students who want to move off-campus due to instances of discrimination, sexual assault, mental health and financial distress. Since then, the Office of Residential Life has been investigating ways to alleviate students’ worries, including the possibility of exemptions from the policy for students who demonstrate substantial need.In an announcement made via email Monday, the Office of Residential Life announced the preferred method of helping students with residential issues will be a streamlined hall transfer process. While exemptions will be available for some students, such exemptions will be rare and determined on a case-by-case basis.Heather Rakoczy Russell, associate vice president for residential life, said the Office of Residential Life believes hall transfers provide students with the chance to find a community better fitted to their needs without moving off-campus.“[The exemption] will be used rarely because we think what we’re actually doing is changing the culture — we hope to change the culture — around hall transfers,” Russell said. “ … We think there’s something very special about residential life here and we think that having an experience of being formed in the residence halls — multi-class, single-sex, randomly placed, all of that — we think that forms people. We want people to have the opportunity to flourish, and if it’s not happening for you in [your hall], we want to redirect you to another [hall] where you might have that experience.”For those instances where a hall transfer would be insufficient, students will be able to apply for an exemption through the Office of Residential Life. Russell said because each exemption will depend on the student’s specific circumstances, she could not provide an example of what would qualify a student to live off-campus early.“I think it will be on a very case-by-case basis, and I don’t think I could in a genuine way answer that question without it just being a shot in the dark,” Russell said. “ … We’re hard-pressed to come up the kind of case that would actually qualify because we think the reasons that would qualify someone for an exemption are probably going to be deeply personal and particular. So, will there be exemptions granted? Certainly, we wouldn’t have created a process if they wouldn’t. But we want to believe … that most of the challenges that students are encountering to their flourishing in their residence halls might be remedied by trying the experience of another residence.”Russell said the application process for an exemption asks the student to demonstrate a clear, corroborated need to move off-campus.“You would first encounter the opportunity to apply for a hall transfer, which would allow for the possibility for someone to hear your story about why you’re not having a good experience and see if there’s another option for you,” she said. “But let’s say there isn’t. Let’s say, based on your particular story, there was an experience of discrimination or sexual assault or something that makes being here feel unwelcome, or maybe it’s financial aid driven, or maybe it’s medically driven, or maybe it’s mental health driven. If it’s any of those kinds of things, what we want to do … is allow for an open-ended process where the student can tell his or her story — but not have to retell it multiple times — and for that story to be heard and corroborated in some ways by someone else if that were attractive to a student.”The announcement said students will need to submit a written application to receive an exemption. If the application is found to have merit, the student will have the option to appear before a review board as well as receive support from a member of the Notre Dame faculty or staff.The announcement also said students will be required to renew their exemption each year.The decision to prioritize halls transfers over exemptions was made by the University with the understanding that residential life is essential to a student’s development, the announcement said.“Sharing life in community in the residence halls supports students’ formation as they deepen their faith, cultivate moral virtues, develop healthy relationships, become servant leaders and reflectively and prayerfully discern their future,” it said. “The mixed-class, single-sex, stay-hall system featuring random assignment of first-year students to modest-sized halls is critical for the model, as is each hall’s unique community, character and traditions.”Because hall transfers will be the primary method of solving a student’s residential issues, Jonathan Retartha, director of residential life for housing operations, said the hall transfer system is changing in two key ways.“First, the elimination of the requirement to speak to your current rector or the rector that you wish to move to,” Retartha said. “It’s not always an option that’s practical or advisable in some circumstances. … The second is to give people the option to select two preferred halls that they’re willing to transfer to. … [They’ll also have] an opportunity to indicate a willingness to accept a spot in any available hall, something closer to what we do in our float-for-a-single process. If they don’t elect that kind of floating option, they’ll be returned back to their original hall’s room picks if those two options they select are not available.”Retartha said in an email that, with the new system, the Office of Residential Life hopes to allow a growing number of hall requests.“Our fall semester typically sees over 200 hall transfer requests, the vast majority of which were approved,” he said. “We do anticipate that number to go up, and we hope to accommodate most requests. However, the capacities of our halls will always limit our ability to honor every request.”These changes to residential policy come at the end of an extended process spent engaging with and listening to the voices of students regarding the six-semester policy. Russell said following the policy’s initial announcement, she saw an overwhelming student response.“Over that fall semester, our office — the Office of Residential Life — received about a hundred emails from current students echoing those same sentiments [of worry],” she said.Proactive engagement with students helped the Office of Residential Life understand the concerns of students better and quell fears held by some students, Russell said.“In the spring semester, our office engaged students in focus groups and listening sessions,” she said. “So, we proactively said, ‘let’s get together,’ and we did that with different groups of student leaders — diversity council, committees on race and ethnicity and LGBTQ students, as well as student senate, [Hall Presidents Council], [Campus Life Council and] various [other] student groups.”Russell said the process led the Office of Residential Life to conclude that what students want most was simply an opportunity to live well in a community.“We think actually what students — without naming it — are asking for is a way to find a place to flourish,” Russell said. “And we think that’s actually to utilize the hall transfer process.”While the new residential policies require students to stay six semesters on campus, there are hopes that new incentives for seniors to stay on campus will convince students to stay all four years. Russell said a mass movement of seniors off-campus would be damaging to the campus culture the University hopes to create.“If what we do with the residence requirement is we have people who live here for six semesters and then they go off in droves as seniors, or we don’t successfully turn the tide on the number of seniors who are staying, our model still falls apart because we don’t have the halls that are created by class,” Russell said.Breyan Tornifolio, director of residential life for rector recruitment, hiring and retention, said seniors who stay on stay on campus are fundamental to the development of all students.“We want our seniors to stay, we want them in the halls,” Tornifolio said. “Our model doesn’t work without the seniors here. The leadership that our seniors provide is crucial to the development of our students, so ways that we keep them here is really important.”To keep seniors on campus, Russell said the Office of Residential Life will be releasing a list of incentives designed to convince seniors to stay on campus in the spring, in time for freshmen to consider their options as they begin looking for future housing. Russell said while nothing has been approved yet, the incentives being considered include more flexible meal plans, free laundry and discounted room and board.Russell said as the six-semester policy, and its associated changes to residential life, take root in campus culture, the program’s success will be found in the number of students who decide to stay on campus all four years.“By giving the choice to seniors, they will vote [on the policies] with their feet and stay,” Russell said. “In a wonderful, perfect world, we have to go the administration and say we need ‘x’ number of new residence halls because so many seniors are opting to stay back because of the experience they had in all six semesters.”Tags: Dorm Culture, Dorm Equality, Hall Transfers, Housing, Office of Residential Life, Six Semester Policy, six-semester requirementlast_img read more

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New CUNA Disaster Recovery Workshop set for Dec. 5-6

first_img 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr All credit unions must have disaster recovery and business resumption contingency plans in place to address all types of operational disruptions, from an hour-long power outage to a fire, flood or tornado that destroys an office building and its contents. At CUNA’s new Disaster Recovery Workshop, set for Dec. 5 and 6 in Las Vegas, credit unions can explore hot topics in business continuity planning (BCP) and incident response.Registration is currently open.BCP and incident response topics that will be explored include:Cybersecurity threats and liability;Vendor preparedness; andBCP examinations. continue reading »last_img

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Joel Patfull to sell three-bedroom Morningside at auction

first_img57 Moolabar Street, Morningside.Former AFL player Joel Patfull plans to see as much of the world as possible and has decided to sell his Morningside home.Patfull, an ex Brisbane Lions Player who was transferred to play for GWS Giants has retired after 14 years. The first property purchase for Patfull was 57 Moolabar St, where he lived for three years when he first moved to Brisbane.“I chose to live there because it was close enough to the Gabba,” he said.“It was quiet and a really nice suburb and still affordable enough for a first homebuyer.” Now his football career is over, Patfull said he was looking to buy a place at Bondi and settle there.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home2 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor8 hours agoHe said special memories of the three-bedroom, one-bathroom home, on a 405sq m block, was when he was younger and had moved up from Adelaide to play regular AFL.“To be able to buy a house at such a young age was something that I felt really fortunate to be able to do,” he said. The back deck area at 57 Moolabar Street, Morningside.Adding a fresh lick of paint to the inside and outside of the property, and a back deck, Patfull said the house would best suit a young professional couple looking to get into the property market. Ray White New Farm selling agent Karla Lynch said the home was perfect for a first homebuyer who had intentions to renovate and add value down the track.“The outdoor entertaining area is my favourite part of the house, there is so much space and enough grass for the kids or fur babies to play on,” Ms Lynch said.She said Morningside was growing rapidly and in a location where buyers were getting value for money. The property goes to auction on March 11 at 1pm.last_img read more

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Wolla’s IMCA Modified national championship is North Dakota first

first_imgJason Wolla won 25 features en route to the IMCA Modified national championship this season. The national title was the first for any North Dakota in any IMCA division. (Photo by Byron Fichter)VINTON, Iowa (Oct. 3) – The driver known as The Big Show is the big name in IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing this season.Jason Wolla raced to the national IMCA Modified championship. The 25-time feature winner, from Ray, is the first North Dakota driver to win a national crown in any IMCA division.“We didn’t have any expectations for this season. We just wanted to put some wins together,” said Wolla, also the first driver from North Dakota to win IMCA’s Side Biter Chassis North Central Regional title. “We had no intentions of running for the national title. We were just racing.”“About midway through the season we were coming home after winning at Minot, got to looking at the points and started to think maybe it was doable,” he continued. “That was when we made the commitment to run for the national championship.”Wolla was track champion at Nodak Speedway and Southwest Speedway and scored Allstar Perfor­mance North Dakota State honors as well.Other first-time national champions were Marcus Thomas of Corsicana, Texas, in the IMCA Rac­eSaver Sprint Cars; Tyler Soppe of Sherrill in the Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods; Cory Wil­liams of Slaton, Texas, in the Scoggin-Dickey Parts Center Southern SportMods; and Dillon Rich­ards of Beatrice, Neb., in the Mach-1 Sport Compacts.Mike Nichols of Harlan and Shannon Anderson of Des Moines extended the single-division mod­ern era record they share to seven national championships, in the IMCA Sunoco Stock Car and IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stock divisions, respectively. Justin Kay of Wheatland raced to a modern era record fourth IMCA Late Model national championship.Nichols collected 32 feature wins en route to EQ Cylinder Heads Northern Region and Shelby County Speedway, Crawford County Speedway and Lexington Raceway track titles.Anderson had 34 wins – including his career 300th – on the way to Big Daddy Race Cars Northern Region and Marshalltown Speedway and Southern Iowa Speedway crowns.Sixteen-time winner Kay was first in the point race at Farley Speedway.Along with 11 feature wins, Thomas took top honors at Kennedale Speedway Park and in Texas state standings.Soppe’s 25 feature wins were complemented by Farley Speedway and Maquoketa Speedway crowns, plus the Iowa state title.Williams topped standings at West Texas Raceway and Cardinal Speedway. He won 17 features this season.Beatrice Speedway track champ Richards was a 27-time winner.Other Modified regional champions were Cory Sample of Winnemucca, Nev., for the second straight year in the Larry Shaw Race Cars Western, Steven Bowers Jr. of Topeka Kan., for the first time in the Jet Racing Central, William Gould of Calera, Okla., for the third time in the Razor Chassis South Central, and A.J. Ward of Ionia, Mich., for the second consecutive year in the Dirt Works Eastern.Nevada state champion Sample had 23 wins and paced points at Rattlesnake Raceway and Winne­mucca Regional Raceway. Gould totaled 19 checkers and reigned at Grayson County Speed­way and in Texas state standings.Bowers was best in Kansas state points. He had 14 feature wins and topped Thunder Hill Speed­way and Heartland Park Topeka standings. Ward’s 17 feature wins helped paved the way to Crys­tal Motor Speedway and I-96 Speedway crowns as well as the Michigan state hardware.Kirk Martin of Weatherford, Texas, was a first-time champion in the EQ Cylinder Heads Southern region for Stock Cars. He had 20 feature wins, earning Boyd Raceway and Texas state honors.Damian Snyder of Copperas Cove, Texas, doubled as Big Daddy Race Cars Southern Hobby Stock Region and Texas state champion.National rookies of the year were Clint Luellen of Minburn in the Modifieds, Bryce Carey of Nashua in the Late Models, Grant Duinkerken of Riverdale, Calif., in the Sprint Cars, Eric Harpole of Bismarck, N.D., in the Stock Cars, Lance Mielke of Norfolk, Neb., in the Hobby Stocks, Jacob Olmstead of Overton, Neb., in the Northern SportMods, Nathan Buchanan of Kemp, Texas, in the Southern SportMods, and Dakota Dees of Weatherford, Texas, in the Sport Compacts.Luellen, also the top rookie in the North Central region, won nine features, track titles at Shelby County Speedway, Buena Vista Raceway and Stuart Speedway, and the Iowa state crown.Olmstead won 10 features and Dees took seven checkers. Mielke made five visits to victory lane, Harpole won three times and Buchanan once.Joining Luellen as Modified regional rookies of the year were Marty Erivez of Gillette, Wyo., in the West, Brandon Clough of Wallace, Neb., in the Central, Ryan Slott of New Waverly, Texas, in the South Central and Nicholas Stormzand of Lowell, Mich., in the Eastern. Clough and Slott both won four times this season.While Harpole was the top rookie in the Northern Stock Car rookie, Jerrett Bransom of Burleson, Texas, paced first-year drivers in the South.Mielke led the way in the Hobby Stock North and Colton Rawls of Waco, Texas, led rookie stand­ings in the Southern Region.Final point races of the 2017 season were held Sept. 24; points become official on Oct. 23. The national awards banquet is Nov. 25 in Lincoln, Neb.Unofficial 2017 IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National Point StandingsIMCA Modifieds – 1. Jason Wolla, Ray, N.D., 1,233; 2. Cory Sample, Winnemucca, Nev., 1,213; 3. Tyler Limoges, Redwood Falls, Minn., 1,204; 4. Steven Bowers Jr., Topeka, Kan., 1,202; 5. A.J. Ward, Ionia, Mich., 1,198; 6. William Gould, Calera, Okla., 1,197; 7. Tyler Frye, Belleville, Kan., 1,191; 8. Matt Guillaume, Haslet, Texas, and Clinton Luellen, Minburn, Iowa, both 1,178; 10. Kelly Shryock, Fertile, Iowa, 1,172; 11. Shawn Fletcher, Brainerd, Minn., 1,171; 12. Clint Hat­lestad, Glencoe, Minn., 1,164; 13. Dean Abbey, Roanoke, Texas, 1,157; 14. Hunter Marriott, Brookfield, Mo., 1,156; 15. Drew Armstrong, Alexander, Ark., 1,152; 16. Travis Hagen, Willis­ton, N.D., 1,150; 17. Chaz Baca, Mesa, Ariz., 1,148; 18. Bryce Garnhart, Shannon, Ill., 1,142; 19. Jeff Hoegh, New Caney, Texas, 1,136; 20. Johnny Saathoff, Beatrice, Neb., 1,132.IMCA Late Models – 1. Justin Kay, Wheatland, Iowa, 809; 2. Matt Ryan, Davenport, Iowa, 806; 3. Todd Cooney, Des Moines, Iowa, 805; 4. Darrel DeFrance, Marshalltown, Iowa, 789; 5. Rob Toland, Colona, Ill., 783; 6. Chad Holladay, Muscatine, Iowa, 780; 7. Jeremiah Hurst, Dubuque, Iowa, 777; 8. Joe Zrostlik, Long Grove, Iowa, 767; 9. Tyler Bruening, Decorah, Iowa, and Ryan Dolan, Lisbon, Iowa, both 763; 11. Joel Callahan, Dubuque, Iowa, 758; 12. Andy Nezworski, Buf­falo, Iowa, 745; 13. Ben Seemann, Waterloo, Iowa, 726; 14. Nick Marolf, Wilton, Iowa, 718; 15. Chuck Hanna, Port Byron, Ill., 715; 16. Gary Webb, Blue Grass, Iowa, 707; 17. Paul Nagle, Ne­vada, Iowa, 706; 18. John Emerson, Waterloo, Iowa, 701; 19. Curtis Glover, Runnells, Iowa, 686; 20. Luke Goedert, Guttenberg, Iowa, 683.IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Cars – 1. Marcus Thomas, Corsicana, Texas, 803; 2. Scott Lutz, Jonestown, Pa., 780; 3. Trevor Serbus, Olivia, Minn., 778; 4. Justin Fifield, Mesquite, Texas, 777; 5. Tyler Reeser, Orwigsburg, Pa., 774; 6. Andy Shouse, Oklahoma City, Okla., 771; 7. Kyle Ganoe, Thompsontown, Pa., and Tyler Drueke, Eagle, Neb., both 767; 9. Zach Blurton, Quinter, Kan., 766; 10. Kaleb Johnson, Sioux Falls, S.D., 765; 11. Zach New­lin, Millerstown, Pa., 757; 12. John Ricketts, Burleson, Texas, 754; 13. Jake Bu­bak, Arvada, Colo., and Adam Gullion, Lincoln, Neb., both 747; 15. Toby Chapman, Panama, Neb., 736; 16. Michael Stien, Ceylon, Minn., 735; 17. Tyler Russell, Abbott, Texas, 732; 18. Dale Wester, Ovilla, Texas, 727; 19. Robert Vetter, Wolfe City, Texas, 726; 20. Kenneth Duke, Selins­grove, Pa., 723.IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars – 1. Mike Nichols, Harlan, Iowa, 1,231; 2. Kirk Martin, Weatherford, Texas, 1,199; 3. Nathan Wood, Sigourney, Iowa, and John Oliver Jr., Danville, Iowa, both 1,198; 5. Jason Wilkinson, Neligh, Neb., 1,196; 6. Donavon Smith, Lake City, Iowa, 1,193; 7. Travis Van Straten, Hortonville, Wis., 1,191; 8. Damon Murty, Chelsea, Iowa, 1,188; 9. Derek Green, Granada, Minn., 1,170; 10. Dan Mackenthun, Hamburg, Minn., 1,166; 11. Damon Hammond, Bur­leson, Texas, 1,152; 12. Matt Speckman, Sleepy Eye, Minn., 1,134; 13. Joren Boyce, Minot, N.D., 1,133; 14. Chad Bruns, Wakefield, Neb., and Brian Blessington, Breda, Iowa, both 1,129; 16. Wes­tin Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 1,127; 17. Jeremy Christians, Horicon, Wis., 1,126; 18. Dalton Flory, Williston, N.D., 1,121; 19. Kyle Wilkinson, Neligh, Neb., 1,118; 20. Devin Snellen­berger, Pulaski, Wis., 1,117.IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks – 1. Shannon Anderson, Des Moines, Iowa, 1,238; 2. Justin Luinen­burg, Reading, Minn., 1,223; 3. Cory Probst, Brewster, Minn., 1,219; 4. Brady Bencken, Oakley, Kan., 1,213; 5. Brandon Nielsen, Spencer, Iowa, 1,205; 6. Jeff Ware, Columbus, Neb., 1,198; 7. Zach Olmstead, Overton, Neb., 1,184; 8. Andrew Bertsch, Minot, N.D., 1,179; 9. Luke Wassom, Broken Bow, Neb., and Eric Cross, Salina, Kan., both 1,178; 11. Chanse Hollatz, Clear Lake, Iowa, 1,175; 12. Austin Brauner, Platte Center, Neb., 1,164; 13. Cody Williams, Minneap­olis, Kan., 1,153; 14. Jason Fusselman, Shelby, Iowa, 1,147; 15. Andrew Borchardt, Plymouth, Iowa, 1,139; 16. Roy Armstrong, Beatrice, Neb., and Tyler Hinrichs, Americus, Kan., both 1,135; 18. Cameron Wilkinson, Neligh, Neb., 1,133; 19. Nick Ronnebaum, Onaga, Kan., 1,128; 20. Jus­tin Wacha, Vinton, Iowa, 1,121.Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods – 1. Tyler Soppe, Sherrill, Iowa, 1,228; 2. Tony Olson, Ce­dar Rapids, Iowa, 1,224; 3. Matthew Looft, Swea City, Iowa, 1,211; 4. Austin Svoboda, David City, Neb., 1,189; 5. Austen Becerra, Bowen, Ill., 1,188; 6. Colby Fett, Algona, Iowa, 1,186; 7. Jesse Skalicky, Fargo, N.D., 1,184; 8. Doug Smith, Lanesboro, Iowa, 1,181; 9. Trent Roth, Colum­bus, Neb., 1,180; 10. David Siercks, Princeton, Minn., 1,173; 11. Erik Laudenschlager, Minot, N.D., and Dakota Sproul, Ellis, Kan., both 1,171; 13. Brandon Lennox, New London, Mo., 1,164; 14. Jake McBirnie, Boone, Iowa, and Jaylen Wettengel, Topeka, Kan., both 1,157; 16. Johna­thon D. Logue, Boone, Iowa, 1,151; 17. Austin Luellen, Minburn, Iowa, 1,149; 18. Kelly Hender­son, Minot, N.D., 1,147; 19. Kelly Jacobson, Fargo, N.D., 1,143; 20. Chris VanMil, Barnesville, Minn., 1,141.Scoggin-Dickey Parts Center Southern SportMods – 1. Cory Williams, Slaton, Texas, 1,209; 2. Jeffrey Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 1,169; 3. Brian J. Carey, Aztec, N.M., 1,166; 4. James Skin­ner, Burleson, Texas, 1,151; 5. Ronnie Bell, Lorena, Texas, 1,133; 6. Jake Upchurch, Grand Prai­rie, Texas, 1,096; 7. James Guyton, Moody, Texas, 1,095; 8. Taylor Florio, Copperas Cove, Texas, 1,079; 9. Sid Kiphen, Gatesville, Texas, and James Hanusch, Belton, Texas, both 1,078; 11. Steve Gray, Vernal, Utah, 1,075; 12. Scott Gray, Vernal, Utah, 1,007; 13. Kamera McDonald, Keller, Texas, 1,003; 14. Gabe Tucker, Carbon, Texas, 991; 15. Allen Montgomery, White Settle­ment, Texas, 984; 16. Nathan Buchanan, Kemp, Texas, 959; 17. Casey Brunson, Lott, Texas, 932; 18. Frank Groves, Shallowater, Texas, 923; 19. Chris Cogburn, Robinson, Texas, 922; 20. Dustin Robinson, Post, Texas, 893.Mach-1 Sport Compacts – 1. Dillon Richards, Beatrice, Neb., 1,207; 2. Mitch Meier, Chilton, Wis., 1,206; 3. Ramsey Meyer, Pierce, Neb., 1,199; 4. Alex Dostal, Glencoe, Minn., 1,157; 5. Levi Heath, Wilton, Iowa, 1,146; 6. Jay DeVries, Spencer, Iowa, 1,142; 7. Jason Berg, Bis­marck, N.D., 1,137; 8. Luke Jackson, Sioux City, Iowa, 1,123; 9. Jake Newsom, Sioux City, Iowa, 1,118; 10. Michael Meier, Chilton, Wis., 1,117; 11. Brooke Fluckiger, Columbus, Neb., 1,115; 12. Tyler Thompson, Sioux City, Iowa, and Darwin Brown Jr., Jackson, Minn., both 1,113; 14. David Bates, Homer, Neb., 1,107; 15. Curtis L. Miller, Lewis, Iowa, 1,096; 16. Austin Friedrich, St. James, Minn., 1,095; 17. Kaitlin DeVries, Spencer, Iowa, 1,093; 18. Julia Childs, Weather­ford, Texas, 1,092; 19. John Martinez, Beatrice, Neb., 1,091; 20. Dustin Jackson, Oneill, Neb., 1,084.last_img read more

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Richards’ hat-trick highlights opening round of DIGICEL schools football in Essequibo

first_imgTELEPHONE giant DIGICEL-sponsored inter-secondary school countrywide football competition kicked off to an exciting start last Wednesday, in Essequibo, with two double-headers at the Anna Regina Multilateral School (ARMS) Anna Regina Community Centre (ARCC) grounds respectively.At ARMS ground, Wakapoa Secondary of the Lower Pomeroon River humbled Cotton Field Secondary 8-3 in the opening match. The hinterland boys played superbly and adapted well to the coastland with athleticism and stamina.Striker Jermain Richards of Wakapoa opened his account as early as the 2nd minute to score his first of three goals, with a neatly placed long-range shot. This was quickly followed by another from Delon Jaikarran in the 5th minute.It was again the combination of the duo as Richards struck again in the 15th, while Jaikarran followed up in the next minute to record his second. Before then Mark Persaud found the net in the 10th and later doubled his account for another in the 28th minute.Goals flowed in the first half as Cleron Boyal netted in the 28th and Richards in the 42nd to complete a hat-trick as Wakapoa ended half-time scoring 8 without conceding any.During the second half, Cotton Field Secondary, who were already shocked by the score-line and Wakaopa’s skill, began to play with some more determination which was lacking in their previous 45 minutes.Their success came in the 61st minute when Ezekiel Scott pierced the net. The Coast-landers seemed to have found their footing and energy even though they were kept in check by their opponents.Their next goal came in the 80th minute off the boot of Jumain John while Joel Holder netted in the 87th and by then the minutes were ticking and so was their final chance at scoring as Wakapoa persevered to win by 8-3.Completing the double-header at ARMS ground was another riveting encounter between 8th of May Secondary and hosts Anna Regina Secondary who proved too friendly and were beaten 4-2.The game began at a fast pace and it was Akeem Norton of 8th of May who struck the first goal in the 4th minute. His team mate Ridley Williams was in action and recorded his first of two goals in the 15th while his partner Jevaun Boston was accurate in the 23rd minute.The consistent and equally skilful Williams again found goal in the 29th to lead 8th of May to 4 goals at halftime. Not to go down without a challenge, ARMS responded with two well executed goals from Christan Bacchus in the 45th and again in the 48th minute.However, it was a little too late as 8th of May defended their early lead and rallied to a 4-2 triumph. Over at the ARCC ground, Abram Zuil Secondary secured a 1-0 victory against Aurora Secondary.The game ebbed and flowed but it was Kyle Skeete who made the difference with the lone goal of the match in the 74th minute for a hard-fought win. The second game was even more intense between New Opportunity Corps (NOC) and Johanna Cecilia Secondary (JCCS) and after 90 minutes neither team had scored.Missed opportunities were countless, but also a few wonderful saves from both goalkeepers were quite remarkable and the vocal crowd reacted.The game then went to a penalty shoot-out and NOC showed their maturity and held their nerves to win 3-1.The winners will now go forward in the knock-out competition for the semi-final play-offs on a date to be announced.last_img read more

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