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Former Manti High School Star Jared Schiess Named As FCS Preseason All-American

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailOGDEN, Utah-Wednesday, former Manti High School football star and current Weber State standout defensive lineman Jared Schiess was named as a second-team STATS Perform Preseason All-American.Last season, Schiess posted 2.5 sacks and 10.5 tackles for a loss for Weber State.Earning first-team All-American status for the Wildcats was two-time All-American, junior tailback Josh Davis and senior offensive lineman Ty Whitworth. Davis amassed 183 carries for 1,136 yards and 11 scores for Weber State  last season.Schiess was joined on the second team by senior kicker Trey Tuttle and senior kick returner Rashid Shaheed earned third-team honors.Tuttle made 23-29 field goal attempts last season for the Wildcats and 44 of his 47 PAT attempts. Shaheed hauled in 20 receptions for 231 yards and three scores last season for Weber State.This past July, Weber State was picked first in the Big Sky Conference preseason polls by both conference head coaches and media.The Wildcats have won three consecutive Big Sky Conference titles and are coming off of a 2019 appearance in the FCS semifinals.Weber State head coach Jay Hill is in his seventh season at Ogden and has posted a record of 47-30 (.610) giving him the highest winning percentage in program history.Hill was named the American Football Coaches Association Region Coach of the Year in 2019 for his attainments. September 2, 2020 /Sports News – Local Former Manti High School Star Jared Schiess Named As FCS Preseason All-American Brad James Written by Tags: NCAA FCSlast_img read more

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NO MORE CORPORATE BAILOUTS

first_imgUnlike his recent predecessors, Trump lacks a clearly articulated economic policy. One could say he’s for “what works,” but that’s not exactly correct. It’s more nuanced than that. He’s for an activist role in economic matters, which explains his support for tariffs against goods coming in from other countries he says harm the U.S.. He believes, therefore, the only way to establish a balance of free trade is to strike at the tariffs imposed on imported U.S. goods with as big a hammer as can be found.Likewise, there’s the matter of corporate bailouts. While campaigning for president, Trump promised to help bring the coal industry back from the oblivion Obama’s environmental policies had consigned it. Nothing wrong with that, per se. America was once a coal nation. The industry provided good jobs at good wages and was part of the nation’s critical industrial base.What Trump didn’t mention was the estimated $34 billion price tag that went along with his plans, all of which would be borne by taxpayers.A leaked U.S. Department of Energy memo from May 2018 described plans to have the government bailout uncompetitive coal and nuclear plants across the country. Companies like FirstEnergy Solutions, which filed for bankruptcy last year, asked the DOE to use its emergency powers to bail out plants. These plants have been rejected by utilities, consumers, and the market for being uneconomical, making any plan by the president to subsidize them a circumvention of the market and public opinion.The effort to keep these uncompetitive assets functioning is, at best, muddle-headed. The plan to mandate regional energy distributors to prioritize the sale of energy from specified coal and nuclear plants over cheaper options like natural gas or oil is a clear example of the government doing something it shouldn’t.The idea of a bailout has received considerable pushback. In January, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission unanimously rejected a proposal by Secretary Rick Perry that asked for preferential treatment of some generating facilities over others, namely nuclear and coal.The White House National Security Council and National Economic Council are also said to be leaning against it, especially the idea that it be done for reasons of national security.Some in the government are attempting to justify the bailout by insisting “grid resiliency” is lacking across the nation, and that nuclear and coal plants have unique advantages against cyber threats. An assessment from the summer of 2018 from the North American Electric Reliability Corporation says otherwise. Hindering competition is a threat to the nation’s economic security and less competition means higher prices for all.Picking winners in the marketplace is beyond the scope and authority of the government, or at least it ought to be. Unfortunately, someone may now have their thumb on the scale. Bernard McNamee recently became a member of FERC – a body now divided two to two between Democrats and Republicans following the untimely passing of Chairman Kevin McIntyre.McNamee’s refused to recuse himself from the discussion should it come before his panel again when, because he worked on the bailout plan while head of policy at the Energy Department, he probably should.It’s the free market, not government favoritism that creates lasting prosperity. Unleashing America’s natural gas development, as Trump has done, has led to drastically cheaper prices for consumers. As a result, natural gas has become the country’s leading energy resource for power generation. This is simply a function of the market and its success has been reflected in employment and capital investment growth.It is unfair to disadvantage the domestic energy market by taking opportunity away from leading resources through preferential treatment of uncompetitive plants. The proposed Department of Energy plan undermines American principles of fairness and free market hopes by dumping the cost on taxpayers. Trump should withdraw it. NO MORE CORPORATE BAILOUTSby Peter Roff, January 17, 2019Nobody has yet figured out the opportunity costs associated with keeping failing companies afloat. There are plenty of politicians who shortsightedly call for an infusion of cash from Uncle Sam anytime an industry is threatened. Surprisingly enough, President Donald Trump is among them. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Students compete in Midnight Madness

first_imgFor the fourth straight year, Student Activities Board (SAB) held Midnight Madness, an event featuring games and inter-class competition, in Angela Athletic Facility at Saint Mary’s on Thursday night.SAB president Erica Chiarello said Midnight Madness is an event focused on developing a sense of community with classmates through games and other fun activities. The four classes earn points toward their respective teams, and the winner is announced before SAB announces the year’s Tostal performer at the end of the night.Chiarello said Saint Mary’s brought back the event four years ago as a way to unite the four classes. Announcing the Tostal artist at the end of the night is important to get students excited about spring activities on campus, she said.Chiarello said Midnight Madness also included giveaways, including free parking passes for next year and Saint Mary’s gear. The giveaways have been key to increasing turnout, but the Tostal artist is also a big draw, she said.The artist for Tostal this year on April 24 will be singer-songwriter Bonnie McKee.Each year, students vote on an artist they want to bring to campus. That protocol continued this year, but, unfortunately, the budget did not allow SAB to bring the selected artist to campus, so SAB selected McKee, Chiarello said.“SAB’s decision to have Bonnie McKee as the Tostal artist was one that the SAB committee made with the whole student body in mind,” Chiarello said. “Even if you do not know who Bonnie McKee is, you will definitely leave Tostal remembering her name.“Bonnie McKee is an artist that has written music for very famous musicians many of whom students listen to [including] Katy Perry, Britney Spears and Rita Ora,“ Chiarello said.McKee wrote “California Gurls” and “Last Friday Night” for Katy Perry as well as “Hold it Against Me” for Britney Spears, Chiarello said.Chiarello said students from Saint Mary’s, Notre Dame and Holy Cross should get excited for this year’s Tostal performance because it will be packed with energy and fun.“Tostal is SAB’s biggest and last event of the year, and we will go out with a bang, Chiarello said.Chiarello said SAB succeeded in bringing students together during Midnight Madness as part of the leadup to Tostal.“We had a really great turnout, especially from the first year [students],” Chiarello said. “We were hesitant, but all four classes showed up and participated.”SAB committee member Emily James said it is important for Saint Mary’s students to go to Midnight Madness and interact with their classmates.“[Midnight Madness] is a fun way to promote school spirit and have fun with your Saint Mary’s sisters,” James said.James said the games included a snack toss, during which a student from each class put a shower cap covered in shaving cream on her head, and another student threw cheese puffs at her head, trying to get the most cheese puffs in the shaving cream. There was also a dancing contest to see who could do “the worm” the best, James said.SAB vice president Allie Gerths said she was happy with the turnout from all the classes.“We’ve been planning for [Midnight Madness] for a few months,” Gerths said. “It gets bigger and bigger every year.”last_img read more

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Nursing Home Worker Tests Positive For COVID-19 In Cattaraugus County

first_imgWNY News Now / MGN Stock Image.OLEAN – A nursing home workers in Cattaraugus County has tested positive for COVID-19.The County Health Department says the female health care worker was tested last week part of New York’s new nursing home testing mandate.The result was reported Tuesday revealing the active case. Prior to the test, health officials say the woman was asymptomatic and denies contact with an active case.There are now 63 cases total with 43 active in Cattaraugus County. The department has begun a contact tracing investigation on the new case. Officials say any resident interested in getting a swab COVID-19 test can register online at cattco.org/coronavirus and click on the COVID-19 Diagnostic Test link.The health department did not identify the specific nursing home involved. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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HBO Has Greenlit American Idiot Film Adaptation

first_img View Comments Rock on! Looks like the long-in-the works film adaptation of Green Day’s American Idiot is finally happening. “We’ve got a green light from HBO and the script is currently going through a couple of rewrites here and there, so I’m not sure when exactly we’re going to start shooting, but it’s definitely all systems go at the moment,” frontman Billie Joe Armstrong told NME. He is still planning to reprise his Broadway role of St. Jimmy in the tuner.Based on Green Day’s Grammy Award-winning album, American Idiot tells the story of three lifelong friends forced to choose between their dreams and the safety of suburbia. The show features the songs “21 Guns,” “Boulevard of Broken Dreams,” “Wake Me Up When September Ends” and “Holiday.”Directed by Michael Mayer, the Tony-nominated tuner opened in the spring of 2010 at Broadway’s St, James Theatre, where it played 26 previews and 422 regular performances. Michael Esper, Stark Sands and John Gallagher Jr. in ‘American Idiot'(Photo: Paul Kolnik)last_img read more

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Herbidide end run

first_imgBy Phil WilliamsUniversity of GeorgiaMorning glories are beloved mailbox flowers all over ruralAmerica. But to farmers, they’re something else: a noxious weedthat can lower yields and choke harvesters. For 30 years, theherbicide glyphosate has kept them out of farm fields, butsomething is changing.For the first time, University of Georgia researchers haveidentified morning glory families that are tolerant toglyphosate. These noxious vines could cause problems for thecountry’s farmers.”Our study suggests that serious and immediate considerationshould be given to developing regional strategies for managingthe evolution of tolerance in morning glories,” said ReginaBaucom, a UGA doctoral student who directed the research.Baucom and UGA assistant professor of genetics Rodney Mauricioco-authored the study. It’s being published this week in theProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The research wasfunded by the National Science Foundation and a research grantfrom Sigma Xi.The tolerance of some morning glories to glyphosate is anaturally occurring trait, not something caused by applyingRoundup and other herbicides that contain the chemical.Glyphosate is used on farm crops and millions of home lawns andgardens.The problem is that the chemical does kill most morning glorieseffectively, so that the tolerant ones could be the “last weedstanding,” leaving farmers without an effective means of control.The current study doesn’t address the practical concerns ofagriculture. Rather, it examines genetically how morning glories– both those that aren’t killed by glyphosate and those that are– lose or maintain the ability to produce offspring for futuregenerations.The issues are complex. The use of herbicides and pesticides hasallowed dramatic increases in food production in the pastcentury. But, as the paper in PNAS points out, the repeated useof herbicides exerting strong selection pressure on crop weedshas led to more than 250 documented cases of herbicideresistance, and “this process is likely to accelerate withincreased reliance on herbicides.”Glyphosate has been available since 1974. But to date, only sixcases of glyphosate resistance in plants have been reported amongthe 250 documented cases of herbicide resistance.The makers of the best-known glyphosate herbicide developedRoundup-Ready canola, corn, cotton, soybeans and sugar beets.Glyphosate doesn’t harm these crop varieties, so farmers can useit to kill weeds and increase yields.”Our interviews with farmers in the Southeast suggest thatmorning glories can tolerate applications of glyphosate,” Baucomsaid. “And, in some cases, increasing concentrations of theherbicide have been required to control it.”Such an increase in tolerance to the chemical gives researchers aunique opportunity to study the evolutionary genetics of a noveltrait. It may help them and others slow the rate of evolution oftolerance in morning glories.What Baucom and Mauricio found was that, in at least one naturalpopulation of morning glories they studied, there is asubstantial genetic variation for tolerance, meaning that the”evolutionary door” is wide open.For evolution by natural selection to succeed, there must begenetic variation with a population and a significant selectiveforce. This study is a case-in-point of evolution by selection –human-mediated evolution, similar to the evolution of bacteriaresistant to antibiotics.”Given the continued presence of glyphosate, the number oftolerant individuals should increase within the population overtime,” the scientists reported, “as might the overall level oftolerance of the population.”Glyphosate is a relatively recent tool in the fight againstweeds. This fact has led the scientists to conclude that thetolerance trait in this wild population was naturally occurring,not caused by use of the herbicide.The presence of genetic variation, however, doesn’t guarantee initself that tolerance to glyphosate will evolve. The “netselection” requirement for tolerance is acted on by twocomponents: fitness costs and benefits. The benefit of beingtolerant must outweigh any sort of cost.If the benefits of being able to tolerate the chemical outweighthe costs, the tolerant individuals will produce offspring forfuture generations and susceptible ones won’t.Costs are thought to include diverting important nutrients andresources away from reproduction into the trait conferring theability to be tolerant.This research has shown positive directional selection fortolerance to glyphosate. So, by applying glyphosate, plants thatare tolerant to it produce more seeds than those that aresusceptible.Perhaps more key for the farmer, however, is the finding that inan environment devoid of glyphosate, tolerant families producemany fewer seeds or offspring than susceptible families.This is evidence of a fitness cost of tolerance, and thisinformation can be used in managing or controlling the furtherevolution of tolerance in morning glories by arguing for notspraying Roundup in certain years.Since the issues are so complex, new strategies will have to beconsidered to control increasing numbers of glyphosate-tolerantvarieties.”Hers [Baucom’s] is the first demonstration of a fitness cost oftolerance to glyphosate,” Mauricio said. “This finding, alongwith an analysis suggesting a critical evolutionary threshold hasbeen crossed, will be of broad interest to scientists andpolicymakers.”Morning glories aren’t at the level of such nuisance weeds asmusk thistles in crops, but they’re still a widespread problemfor farmers. The new evidence for genetic variation of tolerancein morning glories, however, points toward a potential problemwith no easy solutions.”For glyphosate, such strategies could involve something assimple as periodically spraying with alternate herbicides, aslong as there is little cross-tolerance with glyphosate,” theauthors said.”If, however, there is cross-tolerance with other causes of plantdamage, such as hail, herbivores or pathogens,” they said,”alternative spraying regimes may not be a viable mechanism forcontrolling the evolution of glyphosate tolerance.”(Phil Williams is the director of public relations with theUniversity of Georgia Franklin College of Arts and Sciences.)last_img read more

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Middlebury sells downtown building to Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies

first_imgMiddlebury College,Middlebury College and the Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies, one of the state’s leading backers of emerging high-tech businesses, have agreed to a deal that will provide the organization with a beachhead in Middlebury.The Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies (VCET), which currently maintains a facility on the campus of the University of Vermont in Burlington, has agreed to purchase the Old Courthouse at 5 Court Street in downtown Middlebury from the college for $2 million. Middlebury will then lease back most of the Courthouse space from VCET. The building will continue to house staff members from the Office of College Advancement, Middlebury’s fundraising operation, which also occupies Painter House, directly across Court Street from the Courthouse.The purchase and sale agreement was signed by Middlebury College and VCET officials on February 18, and a closing is expected in early March.‘VCET is Vermont’s leading technology incubation organization, and its programs have supported the development and growth of close to 30 businesses,’ said Middlebury College President Ronald D. Liebowitz. ‘Middlebury has benefited in the past from its partnership with VCET, which has provided internship opportunities for many Middlebury students, and we anticipate those opportunities for our students will expand. In addition, we believe VCET’s presence at the Courthouse will be a great asset to the college, the town and Addison County, increasing the economic vitality of the region through its support of new businesses and through the eventual creation of new jobs.  We look forward to working with VCET to help bring alumni and friends of the college back to the region to begin new businesses or expand existing ones.’VCET looks forward to further strengthening its ties with the college, according to David Bradbury, president of VCET. ‘What attracted us to Middlebury was an active willingness and desire on the part of the college to encourage economic development in Addison County and Vermont,’ Bradbury said. ‘There is a strong entrepreneurial environment in Middlebury, in large part thanks to the college and its alumni and students. And Middlebury has always exhibited a very strong ‘plays-well-with-others’ vibe. That’s a compelling advantage in this age of global collaboration.’Bradbury says that U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., along with the Vermont Technology Council and UVM’s Dr. John Evans, conceived of VCET as a technology incubator serving the state of Vermont. Leahy secured federal appropriations from the Small Business Administration and Housing and Urban Development to buy and set up two facilities, and to support the organization. One facility is at UVM’s Farrell Hall and the second will be at 5 Court Street in Middlebury. The senator and his senior staff are also actively engaged in helping the firms with which VCET works. ‘It’s truly remarkable how the senator personally assists next generation employers in Vermont,’ said Bradbury.Said Senator Leahy, ‘Middlebury has been a leader in fostering entrepreneurship in Vermont, and the agreement with VCET forges a partnership that will build new businesses and create new jobs for Vermonters. I commend the college for having the vision and commitment to spur future economic development in Addison County and Vermont.’The benefit to the college and the town of collaborating with VCET was demonstrated most recently in December 2010, when eCorp English, a company based in Malta that teaches English as a second language to business executives, announced that it would move its headquarters and IT development division to Middlebury, creating about 35 new jobs locally, and possibly more down the road. VCET and Middlebury College worked with several other Vermont organizations to help persuade eCorp English to choose Vermont in general and Middlebury in particular.In its nearly six years in existence, VCET has worked with about 30 companies, which have attracted $20 million in investment from public and private sources. The companies now employ about 150 people, up and down the state, from Woodstock to Middlebury to Burlington. And they’re hiring: Bradbury says that the companies now have about 45 job openings. ‘Our laser focus is on creating next-generation jobs for this generation of Vermonters,’ he said. ‘Momentum and results are accelerating, and we see great potential here in the Middlebury region.’Bradbury expects the Courthouse to serve as an occasional office for him and for other VCET executives, and to provide, eventually, space for ‘entrepreneurs in residence,’ and possibly for start-ups in need of short-term physical space. But he points out that the VCET model is more about ‘the talent cloud’ ‘ the people they work with, and their networking potential in support of emerging employers ‘ than about just providing a physical home for early-stage businesses.Bradbury says that having a base of operations in Middlebury ‘will make it clear that we really do serve the whole state,’ adding that it will be easier to work with companies in central and southern Vermont from a hub in Middlebury. ‘Partnering with Middlebury College’s leading innovation and entrepreneurial programs makes a lot of sense for VCET and our ecosystem of partners,’ he said. ‘And, most importantly, it will allow us to offer more help to Vermont’s entrepreneurs. It’s really a triple win, for us, for Middlebury and for Vermont.’About the Courthouse: The distinctive red brick building at 5 Court Street in downtown Middlebury, was built in 1883 on land originally owned by one of Middlebury’s founders, Gamaliel Painter. At one time hailed as the most beautiful courthouse in the state, the building replaced the original wooden courthouse, which was built in 1796 on what was then called Court Square. The brick courthouse was itself eventually replaced by the Mahady Courthouse, built in 1995-1996 just a few yards to the southeast. The college has owned the Old Courthouse since then, and it has been home at one time or another to Middlebury’s Center for Educational Technology, the Communications Office, and College Advancement.About VCET: The Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies is a leading-edge technology firm incubation program serving all of Vermont. Select, high opportunity firms are provided with substantive business mentoring, flexible office space, shared resources, venture capital, entrepreneurial workshops and access to VCET’s proprietary network of venture development professionals, investors and economic development partners. VCET is an independent 501 (c) 3 public benefit corporation. For more information, visit the website: www.VermontTechnologies.com(link is external).February 24, 2011 Middlebury Collegelast_img read more

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Long Beach Man Admits to Killing Teen

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Long Beach teenager has admitted to fatally beating and strangling an 18-year-old Lynbrook woman who was found dead in Rockville Centre nearly two years ago.Maxwell Sherman pleaded guilty Friday at Nassau County court to second-degree murder. A charge of sex abuse was dropped in exchange for his plea.Authorities have said that the 19-year-old killed Lauren Daverin, who was found by witnesses on the Mill Pond footbridge between Sunrise Highway and Merrick Road in August 2013.Sherman later told Rockville Centre village police that he had been assaulted on the footbridge that night and confirmed that he was the last person on the bridge with the victim after a group of other people left, prosecutors said.A witness also told investigators that he saw Sherman on top of Daverin on the bridge, authorities said. The witness later identified Sherman in a photo array.Judge Meryl Berkowitz is expected to sentence Sherman to 18 years to life in prison on June 11.last_img read more

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3 ways to stay number one in your members’ financial lives

first_imgYou’ve got competition everywhere. If you want to stay relevant, you’ve got to find new, innovative ideas to solve your members’ problems. Here are three ways you can remain on top in your members’ financial lives…Think BIG: Doing things the way they’ve always been done won’t get you anywhere. In fact, it won’t even keep you in business. When it comes to solving problems, ignore the past. Consider the ideal outcome and then brainstorm ways to make it happen. Not every idea will be successful, but if you want to innovate, you have to take risks and be all-in on them.Keep your eye on the target: Far too often, we get distracted by things that don’t really matter. Focus on ways you can improve your products and services. If something isn’t working, get creative and change it. Innovation is born from hard work and creative minds.Collaborate: Surround yourself with others who want to be great. Look for employees who dream like you do and use them. A team of creative minds can come up with amazing ideas that can positively impact the lives of your members for decades to come. 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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EPL: Arteta conflicted as Arsenal eye benefit from Man City ban

first_img The 20-year-old missed his big chance to make an impact when he hit the bar from Nicolas Pepe’s cut-back in an explosive start to the second period from Arsenal. Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang showed his young apprentice how to pounce in front of goal as he rose highest to power home Pepe’s floated cross on 54 minutes. One of the revelations of Arteta’s early days in charge has been Bukayo Saka’s performances as a makeshift left-back. No Arsenal player has created more goals than the 18-year-old this season and Saka nutmegged Valentino Lazaro before teeing up Pepe to fire home the hosts’ second from close range. “He takes responsibility, he takes risks in the final third. He is a player who wants to make an impact, he has courage,” said Arteta. Newcastle have scored just 24 goals in 26 league games this season and their lack of a goal threat was obvious as they chased the game in the final half hour. But Steve Bruce was most disappointed with their defending as they conceded twice more in the closing stages. “The goals were gave away were not like us, it was too easy,” said Bruce. “We did not start the half like we should’ve done. We’ve been sloppy and given away awful goals.” Read Also: Allardyce can see Guardiola quitting Man City for Juventus Lacazette replaced Nketiah five minutes from time and made a huge impact to give his confidence a much-needed boost. Firstly, the Frenchman crossed for Mesut Ozil, whose tame shot squirmed through Martin Dubravka’s grasp. Luck then shone on Lacazette to end a nine-game goal drought as his right-footed shot flicked off his left foot and flew into the top corner in the fifth minute of stoppage time. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Arsenal manager Mikel Arteta said he still only wants the best for former employers Manchester City, even though a European ban for the English champions could give the Gunners a route into next season’s Champions League. A 4-0 win over Newcastle on Sunday lifted Arsenal up to 10th in the Premier League, but just six points adrift of Tottenham in fifth. Nicolas Pepe (centre) celebrates Arsenal’s second goal in a 4-0 win over Newcastle City’s two-season ban handed down by UEFA on Friday means fifth will be enough to secure a Champions League place unless the champions succeed in overturning that sanction at the Court of Arbitration for Sport. Arteta, who left City to take his first senior managerial role at the Emirates in December, could now be the beneficiary of his former club’s punishment. “It’s very difficult. I want the best for Manchester City, the best for Pep (Guardiola) and the players. The only thing I want for them is positive and good things,” said the Spaniard. “I just want to do for Arsenal the best I can.” Victory was just the second in eight league games since Arteta took charge and there was plenty of encouragement for the 37-year-old in Arsenal’s second half performance after an all too familiar subdued first 45 minutes. “We talked before the game that we wanted to turn draws into wins,” added Arteta after a run of six draws in eight games. “The first half it was a little bit slow, but the way they play with low block, you can get frustrated. We improved much more in the second half.” – Explosive Arsenal – Arteta handed Eddie Nketiah his first Premier League start up front at the expense of the out-of-form Alexandre Lacazette. Promoted Content6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually True7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The UniverseYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime7 Reasons It’s Better To Be A VeganHere Are The Top 10 Tiniest Mobile Phones On The Planet!10 Unusual (And Stunning) Human TraitsBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right Now14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowThe Models Of Paintings Whom The Artists Were Madly In Love With8 Shows That Went From “Funny” To “Why Am I Watching This”Insane 3D Spraying Skills Turn In Incredible Street Artcenter_img Loading… last_img read more

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