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27,000 Students Write WAEC Today

first_imgMore than 27,882 candidates will begin writing the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) exams today Monday, May 19, John Y. Gayvolor, WAEC Monrovia Head of Office has confirmed.`The candidates who registered to write this year’s annually-administered tests, according to Mr. Gayvolor, are representing at least 442 high schools from the 15 counties with Montserrado containing the highest numbers.In an exclusive interview Sunday, May 18, with thzaqe Daily Observer at his Congo Town office, he said preparations for the administration of the exams have been put in place to avoid any unnecessary hiccups during the weeklong process.The Monrovia WAEC head has encouraged all registered candidates to do their best to produce “acceptable results” at the end of the tests.This year’s exams, he said, will follow the same patterns as previously arranged in all of the four major subjects—Mathematics, General Science, Social Studies, Language Arts and other elective subjects.Earlier in her ‘good will message’ over the weekend to students sitting the 12th grade WAEC administer tests, the Minister of Education, Etmonia David Tarpeh, said the 12th grade exams are the measures to evaluate what the students have achieved over the last three years in the education sector.This year’s exams are being administered to students from 442 high schools — government, private and/or faith-based institutions — across the country.Of the 27,882 candidates, 15,130 are males, while 12,752 are females.According to Minister Tarpeh, all proctors, supervisors or monitors selected to administer the exams are being warned to exercise the greatest degree of integrity, restraint and commitment to the process.Candidates are also being advised to abide by rules abolishing the use of cell phones, pieces of paper and electronic gadgets other than the ones distributed or allowed in the hall by the examiners.Meanwhile, the MOE in collaboration with WAEC is appealing to parents, guardians and the general public not to enable or assist students to engage in acts inimical to the administration of the tests. This would include the solicitation of money or facilitation of “flexibility fees” as has previously been the case.Henceforth, the MOE has warned that anyone (proctors, examiners, monitors, etc) caught in acts outside of the exams protocol will be arrested and turned over to the courts for prosecution.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img
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World’s 1.8B Young People Can Propel Socioeconomic Development

first_imgDeveloping countries with large youth populations could see their economies soar, provided they invest heavily in young people’s education and health and protect their rights, according to The State of World Population 2014, published recently by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).The potential economic gains would be realized through a “demographic dividend,” which can occur when a country’s working age population is larger than the population that is dependent and younger, the report shows.But to maximize the dividend, countries must ensure that their young working-age populations are equipped to seize opportunities for jobs and other income-earning possibilities.“Today’s record 1.8 billion young people present an enormous opportunity to transform the future,” says UNFPA Executive Director, Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin. “Young people are the innovators, creators, builders and leaders of the future. But they can transform the future only if they have skills, health, decision-making, and real choices in life,” he added.With the right policies and investments in human capital, countries can empower young people to drive economic and social development and boost per-capita incomes, the new UNFPA report states.The UNFPA Executive Director urges countries in pursuit of a demographic dividend to ensure the gains result in growth that benefits everyone.“It is too easy to talk about the demographic dividend in terms of money, savings and economic growth, which have so far excluded many,” Dr. Osotimehin says. “The demographic dividend must be harnessed to achieve inclusive growth and offer opportunities and well-being for all.”In the 1950s and 1960s, several East Asian economies invested heavily in young people’s capabilities and in expanding their access to voluntary family planning, enabling individuals to start families later and have fewer children. The result was unprecedented economic growth. The Republic of Korea, for example, saw its per-capita gross domestic product grow about 2,200 per cent between 1950 and 2008.Nine in ten of the world’s young people today live in less developed countries. Because of lagging social services, these countries face greater obstacles to leveraging the advantages that can result from engaging a youthful, productive workforce.The UNFPA report shows that demographic shifts taking place in about 60 countries are opening a window for a demographic dividend. The size of the dividend depends largely on how those countries invest in young people to realize their full potential.If sub-Saharan African countries repeated the East Asian experience by making the right investments in young people, enabling them to participate in decisions that affect their lives and adopting policies to bolster economic growth, the region as a whole could realize a demographic dividend amounting to as much as $500 billion a year, for 30 years.A demographic dividend of this magnitude has the potential to lift hundreds of millions of people out of poverty and raise living standards and catapult economies forward, the report states. Critical youth investments needed to reap a demographic dividend are those that protect rights, including reproductive rights, improve health, including sexual and reproductive health, and provide skills and knowledge to build young people’s capabilities and agency. These investments can also accelerate fertility declines, which can in turn accelerate the demographic transition.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Law Reform Commission Inducts 1st Legislative Drafters’ Class Leaders

first_imgThe Law Reform Commission (LRC) has inducted into office the leadership of the first class of legislative drafters.Legislative drafters are individuals all of whom don’t necessarily have law backgrounds, but have backgrounds in other disciplines, and are employees of various government ministries and agencies. They are undergoing a vigorous seven hours a day, month-long training on how to do legislative drafting. The 35 member are being trained under the auspices of the LRC.The LRC is statutorily mandated to lead the law reform process of Liberia by reviewing the laws, proposing amendments where necessary and ensuring that the laws are modernized to meet contemporary times.To meet this objective, LRC has to meet with various stakeholders, who have interests and parts to play in drafting laws.This has, however, become difficult for the LRC because a lot of the times when instruments to be enacted into law are sent to them, they (instruments) are “very poorly drafted and they would have to be drafted over,” according to Cllr. Jallah Barbue, Chairman of the LRC.Dr. Barbue said there is so much pressure on the Commission that they are not able to keep redrafting laws from scratch. According to him, because of some delays, tension has erupted between the LRC and some of their partners and others with interests in the law.“So, on that basis, we realized that rather than just leading the process of drafting and redrafting, it is important that we have documents (coming) from trusted individuals at public institutions and agencies, who already have basic ideas of what to do. So it’s on that basis that we thought that we should conduct a training of this nature,” he stated. The 30+ members of the first class elected Attorney Nadia S. Kamara, President; Rev. Melvin Kennedy, Vice President and Matthew N. Kumeh, Secretary General.The induction ceremony was performed by Nimba County Dist. #7 Representative Wolea-Sawah Dunah. He said the idea of the legislative drafting training, from their experience at the Capitol, is a necessity. “We want to commend the LRC for organizing this one,” he added. “This training focuses on the critical works that we were elected to do.”In her inauguration speech, Attorney Kamara raised the concern of what becomes of them after their training as legislative drafters is over at the end of October. “Do we go on our own, doing our usual tasks at our various institutions? Will we receive the requisite recommendations from the government and thereby be placed in appropriate institutions in order to utilize our knowledge?” she asked.She told her colleagues that they should be aware that as legislative drafters, they have the responsibility to construct legislations, which have effects on government policies and to communicate the law “clearly to people who are affected by it, to the officials who administer it and to the judges who interpret and apply the law.”Madam Kamara is from the Association of Female Lawyers of Liberia (AFELL), Rev. Kennedy from is the National Civil Society Council of Liberia, while Mr. Kumeh works at the House of Representatives.In response, LRC vice Chairperson, Cllr, Deweh E. Gray said “We have plans that after the third week of the training, you are going to be placed in your various institutions where you will be able to put into practice what you have learned over two week (s).”Cllr. Gray said the reason is to evaluate the trainees and will also help them in strengthening the training and filling in gaps.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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‘Government is Making Us Lazy’ -Says a Liberian Farmer

first_imgMr. Kamara’s says he has cultivated 150 acres of upland rice with a high premium variety and has 78 metric tons of milled rice in his warehouseMr. Mohammed Kamara, a Liberian farmer and the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Agriculture Infrastructure and Investment Company (AIIC) in Foya, Lofa County, says Liberia is experiencing a huge importation of rice, because the government is not providing support to inspire farmers.“Liberians consume millions of metric tons of rice every year, with a significant portion of its consumption sourced from imports; so the government needs to go back to the policies of the 60s and 70s when farmers were given loans to improve their farming activities,” Mr. Kamara said.Kamara told the Daily Observer recently in Foya, Lofa County, that he has cultivated 150 acres of upland rice with a high premium variety and has 78 metric tons of milled rice in his warehouse, “because my dream is to reduce the importation of Asian and European rice in the country, but only if I can get the needed funding.”Mr. Kamara holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Management from the University of Liberia and is the owner of the AIIC, which is in business of rice farming. His farm is considered to be the largest commercial rice farm by land size in the county, situated on 150 acres of land, and employs more than 100 locals.Some of the milled rice in Mr. Kamara’s AIIC warehouse.“I want to battle the importation of rice, but with the traditional shifting cultivation method still being used in Liberia, it is a difficult war to fight,” he said.“I appreciate engaging the collective through community involvement. This has actually inspired AIIC to set up a few initiatives, such as giving seeds to farmers for seed multiplication,” Mr. Kamara added.He told the Daily Observer that he has been contracted by the World Food Program (WFP) to supply 48 metric tons of rice as part of its school feeding program for this academic year.“In the coming months, WFP will also be contracting my organization to provide 1,000 metric tons of rice for its school feeding program in Lofa County,” Mr. Kamara said.“I want us Liberians to regain our pre-war status by eating our traditional rice [country rice], because it is organic; meaning it is nutritious,” he said.He then used the occasion to commend the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the implementing partners for the support.Mr. Kamara lauded the China-Liberia Agricultural Technology Cooperation Project, based at China-Liberia Agriculture Demonstration Center in Suakoko, Bong County, for the technical and material support to his organization.He said that China-Liberia Agricultural Technology Cooperation Project provided 180kg of upland rice seeds and planting process training, weeding, fertilizer application and pest and disease control for farmers in order to have a good yield.Milled Rice in Foya, Lofa County, produced by Mohammed Kamara’s AIICShare this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Linden Mayor urges constables to be gatekeepers of town

first_img…as constabulary celebrates 51st anniversaryLinden Mayor, Waneka Arrindell has urged members of the Linden Town Constabulary to understand their roles and to be gatekeepers of the town, as the constabulary recently celebrated 51 years of existence. The anniversary was marked by a ceremonial march past and salute by constabulary ranks followed by a ceremony hosted at the Egbert Benjamin Centre in Linden. Three constabulary employees were also awarded for their exemplary contributions to the constabulary over the years. Nicola Noble was awarded Best Corporal, while Ron Johnson was awarded Most Improved Constable and Myra Richards was awarded for Best Attendance.Arrindell in her remarks noted that the Town’s Constabulary has one hundred per cent of her support. Linden’s Town Clerk, Orleena Obermuller, in a brief history of the constabulary, noted that the Department has grown in strength and personnel over the years.The Linden Town Constabulary was established on April 19, 1967, and enlisted 9 members on April 24 into the Guyana Police Force Training School at Eve Leary. With the emergence of the North Mackenzie and Wismar-Christianburg local authorities came the expansion of the Local Authority Area and the town establishing its status in 1970. Constabulary constables were then reappointed as town constables. Presently, there are 27 ranks, including a Superintendent, an Inspector, two sergeants, three corporals and 21 constables, who are mandated to secure and protect the Council’s property as well as to maintain law and order within the boundaries of the town. They are also assisted by eight security guards.The Linden Town Constabulary officers during a march to commemorate its 51st Anniversarylast_img read more

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