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16-Year-Old Girl Dies After Falling Off Ledge In Zoar Valley

first_imgStock Image.OTTO – Officials with the Cattaraugus County Sheriff’s Office say a 16-year-old girl died after falling off a ledge in Zoar Valley.First responders were called to the scene around 6 p.m. on Saturday.Deputies say the girl sustained facial injuries in the fall.Medical crews from the Otto, Eden and Gowanda Fire Department assisted law enforcement at the scene. Deputies say the investigation into the incident is still ongoing.The Erie County Sheriff, New York State Police, New York Forest Rangers and New York Environmental Police were also on scene.No further information about the incident was released. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img

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Lawmakers to GAO: Work with credit unions on Reg D study

first_img 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, and Rep. Robert Pittenger, R-N.C., urged the Government Accountability Office to conduct a study on the impact of Regulation D’s limit on transfers from savings accounts and that the GAO consult with credit unions and community banks on the issue.A similar study was called for under the House-passed “Regulation D Study Act,” H.R. 3240. While cleared unanimously by the House, the bill failed to get action in the Senate. Hensarling and Pittenger want the GAO to study the issue anyway.“Federal Reserve Regulation D limits consumers to six transfers per month from their savings account to any other accounts. This regulation is over 30 years old and has not been significantly revised since it was first implemented,” Hensarling and Pittenger wrote.Hensarling and Pittenger requested the study to examine the history of the monthly transfer limit and what benefits might arise from increasing it. H.R. 3240, which was passed by the House this month, would require a study of the impact of the requirements on depository institutions, consumers and monetary policy. Prior to the bill’s passage, sponsors Pittenger, and Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., both cited NAFCU’s support of the measure in their remarks before the full House. continue reading »last_img read more

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Wright-Patt straps onto smartwatch market

first_imgby: Tina OremWright-Patt Credit Union’s 300,000 members can now be among the first in the U.S. to be able to check their account balances with just a flick of an Android Wear smartwatch, thanks to a new app released Thursday.The smartwatch app automatically syncs to users’ Android Wear devices after they upgrade to the updated Wright-Patt Credit Union mobile app. Using their voices, users can get account balances without logging in on their mobile phones, the credit union said in an announcement. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img

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Brett Culp: Honor everyday heroes

first_img 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » Brett Culp believes in the power of video and film to inspire and empower.“As I started to fall in love with filmmaking and improved as a storyteller, I realized my gift was to find light in dark spaces—to see the power and the goodness in people and in their life stories even when they could not see it for themselves,” he says.Culp is the personal cinematographer for Hollywood stars, music icons, and famous athletes. His 2013 documentary, “Legends of the Knight,” which tells true stories of people who become real-life heroes through their love of the comic book character Batman, is a prime example of that gift.One of those heroes is Lenny Robinson, who became internet famous for getting pulled over by the police while driving down an interstate in Baltimore in a replica of the Batmobile while wearing a full Batman costume.“There is this video from the dash cam of the police car where you can hear the police officers talking, where you see Batman get pulled over by the police, and it is hilarious,” Culp says.last_img read more

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‘I was at 702 calls’: Locals struggle to file for unemployment, what NYSDOL is doing now

first_imgA new filing system that works to split up callers over days of the weekLess times you have to call to talk to someoneWorking to add 300 more people to answer phones on top of the 700 doing so nowAdding more hours at the telephone claim center, even on the weekend The NYSDOL says recently, its unemployment insurance filing system took on a 16,000% increase in phone calls, but say they’ve made and are making changes including: Kaitlin Spickerman worked at Jade and Rose Salon in Endicott as a hair stylist until a few weeks ago. This marks a more than 2,000% increase from last year. “The first day I was at 702 calls on just my phone… the second I had about 900 on my phone,” said Spickerman. “I’m excited to get back to work for sure,” she said. When salons were forced to shut down across New York due to the coronavirus pandemic, Spickerman was out of a job. She began the process of filing for unemployment using multiple phones and said over two days, she made thousands of calls. As for Spickerman, she was eventually able to file successfully and hopes she won’t be unemployed for long. (WBNG) — The New York State Department of Labor reports thousands of people filed for unemployment in the Southern Tier in the last few weeks and many are struggling through the process. According to the New York State Department of Labor, Spickerman joins more than 10,000 others who filed an initial claim during the week ending in March 28th, just in the Southern Tier Region. You can access the NYSDOL website here. For information about the CARES Act, click here.For information about benefits, click here.For information about how to file a claim, click here.last_img read more

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A Nation Votes for Joe Biden, and a Red State Shrugs

first_imgMs. Kienke, like nearly everyone else in the county, is a Republican. She said that if Mr. Trump had won the election, Democrats would have rioted. But she predicted Mr. Trump’s supporters would stand down and accept a Biden victory.“I don’t think they’re going to shoot up the towns,” she said.When Craig Softley realized last week that the presidential vote was swinging Mr. Biden’s way, his thoughts turned to a divided nation. Not just the kind of political division that has fractured much of America, but literal, maybe-it’s-time-we-cleave-this-country-into-two-nations kind of division. He was thinking of secession.“Is there a point that this country becomes actually split?” he said he thought as he watched the vote tallies from around the country.Mr. Softley, a Republican, lives in Hayes County, where nearly 93 percent of voters supported Mr. Trump and which was named for the 19th U.S. president, Rutherford B. Hayes, who won an election by just one Electoral College vote.But as he watched the counting progress, Mr. Softley’s thinking evolved. He is a volunteer firefighter, drives an ambulance, helps on a ranch, started a consulting business, serves as the county’s economic development coordinator and helped found a church, where he is trying to grow the congregation. Most days he starts his workday at 3:50 a.m.“By Wednesday morning or midday, it looked like a pretty strong possibility it was going to be Biden, and you just resign yourself to the fact,” he said. “You’ve got to keep working, just got to move on.” – Advertisement – “I couldn’t see in advance it would have any significant outcome in the race for president,” said Mr. Chambers, who represents parts of the district in Omaha, which has the state’s largest population of Black residents. “Had I not fought like I did, the votes and attitudes of the people of the Second District would have been insignificant.”Yutan, population 1,300, is just over the border from the Second Congressional District, but a long leap as far as its politics go. Seventy-one percent of voters in Saunders County, where Yutan is, cast ballots for Mr. Trump.It has the trappings of many rural Nebraska small towns: an overwhelmingly white population, grain bins alongside railroad tracks, a water tower, a short strip of stores both open and long-ago shuttered, and roads that dead-end into cornfields.Ms. Thiessen lives in Valley, Neb., just inside the western edge of the Second District, but was raised in Yutan, where she visits her parents regularly and shares the political views of her hometown. She was annoyed by the attention received by the Second District, even if that is her district. Still, she remains focused on moving on.Not all of Mr. Trump’s backers in Nebraska were brushing off the latest voting results. In Lincoln, supporters rallied outside the capitol yelling that Mr. Biden had stolen the election. In Yutan, some expressed worries about trade and the economy under Mr. Biden. One woman stood in her lawn and said she was waiting once Mr. Biden took office “for my government-issued Chinese flag.” Her neighbor worried about socialism taking root. Both were worried that if they gave their names to a reporter, liberals would track them down and destroy their homes. The 2020 presidential vote hammered home the political divide in the country, with states supporting Mr. Biden largely located along the coasts, and those supporting Mr. Trump in a swath down the middle. Nebraska is tucked deep among them. More than 90 percent of voters supported Mr. Trump in at least five of its 93 counties.- Advertisement – “Out here in rural America, nobody else is going to do it for me. I have to do it myself,” said Ann Neiffer, who owns Tall Tails Taxidermy, in Cherry County, where more than 87 percent of voters, including her, cast ballots for Mr. Trump. “Because life comes so hard here, the Republican ideal is what we have. It’s kind of me, myself and I.”The pandemic shut down Ms. Neiffer’s operation for two months earlier this year and the economic fallout is the reason she believes customers have not picked up and paid for 33 deer, a bison, an elk, a beaver and two bobcats. She worries a Biden administration will further hurt her business by cracking down on gun sales that could affect hunting.Tucker Sheets, the owner of Cowboy Welding, in Hiyannis, Neb., is worried about a Biden administration limiting his Second Amendment rights, and has a host of other concerns about the next four years. YUTAN, Neb. — In the moments after the presidential vote tally made it clear that Joseph R. Biden Jr. had won the election on Saturday, a teenager wheeled a broken lawn mower across an empty downtown street here. Wispy white clouds blew across the sky. Inside the Rusty Rooster Saloon, a man with gray hair took a swig from a Bud Lite can, and the only result that interested anyone was the outcome of the college football game on the television.Amber Thiessen was gassing up her new pickup truck at a filling station on the edge of town, a Republican stronghold just like the overwhelming majority of the state. She voted for President Trump and thinks Mr. Biden and other Democrats like Hillary Clinton are “snakes in the grass.”- Advertisement – Updated Nov. 8, 2020, 7:15 p.m. ET “A lot of people, when this happened for Trump in 2016, they started saying ‘not my president,’” she said. “He has never been given the opportunity to show how much he loves the country because of these ‘not my president’ people.”Ms. Thiessen is unhappy that her candidate didn’t win. But she has no plans to say Mr. Biden isn’t her president. Because she knows that once he is sworn in, he will be, regardless of whether she likes it. For many Nebraskans in rural areas, seeing that blue dot on the map stung. The neglect they feel by the rest of the country, and even by the cities in their own state, has fueled their politics, they said. But the knowledge here that Mr. Biden won the presidency — and that Nebraska even sent an Electoral College vote his way — was met with a what-goes-around-comes-around kind of attitude. Many Republicans said they planned to show liberals, who they said had whined for four years about Mr. Trump, that it was possible to simply move on when you lose.“In America, you get four years and you can do it again,” Ms. Thiessen said. “I hear a lot of restaurants are going under, but we’re doing pretty good,” said Ms. Kienke, a fifth-generation cattle rancher whose ancestors immigrated from Germany. “There’s very little Covid here, and people who do have it stay home.”She is hosting two Italian and French exchange students, and during the Halloween season took them to corn mazes and haunted houses. She said the students sent photos to their friends back home who were quarantining, bragging about how open America was in comparison. Or, put another way: “No one died because of hating Trump,” he said. “And I won’t die from not liking Biden.”Inside the Cattleman’s Lounge in Springview, Neb., signs supporting Mr. Trump decorate the restaurant.Joleen Kienke, the owner, said she had voted for Mr. Trump because the president opposed the shutdown of the nation’s economy during the pandemic. Cases of Covid-19 are surging across Nebraska, but the effects of the virus aren’t as obvious in Keya Paha County, home to fewer than 300 residents, where Springview is.Ms. Kienke said the income from the lounge and her Cattleman’s Bunkhouse had increased in recent months. Throughout the week, a little blue dot glowed on the map of results in an otherwise red sea, showing Nebraska’s single electoral vote for Mr. Biden. And in some ways, that dot could make it easier to accept the results, regardless of party affiliation. Without a winner-take-all system, the state is not taken entirely for granted, and that can make the whole endeavor feel less futile.- Advertisement – Nebraska is one of two states that splits its electoral votes; the other is Maine, and State Sen. Ernie Chambers, an independent who spent the early years of his long political career as the only Black lawmaker in the Nebraska legislature, has fought to keep that split-vote system on the books. “We want our tax breaks. We want our guns. We don’t want our money going to social programs,” said Mr. Sheets, who voted for Mr. Trump. “We all work hard out here. There isn’t a lot of money to go around in this rural area.”Just 20 people voted for Mr. Biden in Grant County, where Cowboy Welding is, “and I have a pretty good idea of who a few of them are. There definitely aren’t 20 signs out in yards.” Like a handful of other rural counties, Grant also rejected a ballot measure that would have stricken an old provision that allowed slavery to be used as punishment, though the measure overall passed.Mr. Sheets said Biden voters were unhappy with Mr. Trump in much the same way he predicted he would be unhappy with a President Biden. But he is anticipating one key difference.“In the 2016 election after Trump won, we got nothing but crying and whining and trying to get rid of him for four years. I don’t want to do that. I want to move on and keep going.”last_img read more

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The lack of runways is a problem – but who knows when it will be resolved

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Japanese companies hold firm on investment plans in Indonesia despite drop in sales, production

first_imgHowever, despite plunging sales and production rates, 69 percent of respondents remained confident about their future investment strategies in Indonesia. Only 15 percent intended to slash their future investments amid the current economic woes.“Many Japanese companies still see Indonesia as a potential market. While it’s true that demand is decreasing in the short term, consumption will return in the long run,” JETRO senior director Wataru Ueno told reporters during an online briefing on Tuesday.The coronavirus outbreak, which was first detected in China, has put a strain on Indonesia’s foreign direct investment, partially due to the social restrictions implemented to contain the spread of the virus. Indonesia booked a 9.2 percent year-on-year (yoy) decline in foreign direct investment (FDI) to Rp 98 trillion (US$6.8 billion) in the first quarter of 2020.Japan was the fourth largest contributor of foreign investment to Indonesia in the first quarter of the year, investing $604.2 million. Last year, it invested a total of $4.3 billion, making it the third-largest foreign investor overall, trailing China and Singapore, Investment Coordinating Board (BKPM) data show. Of all sectors, the transportation and machinery industries have felt the biggest impact, with 82 percent of companies in the sectors seeing a drop of more than 50 percent in sales compared to before the pandemic. In total, 97 percent of manufacturers in the sector have reduced their production rates, in compliance with the social restrictions imposed in several regions.Indonesia’s Purchasing Managers Index (PMI), a gauge of the nation’s manufacturing activities, hit 39.1 points in June, rebounding from 28.6 the previous month, but still far below the 50-point benchmark that indicates growth, according to market consultancy firm IHS Markit.To survive the current crisis, Japanese companies are utilizing the government’s tax incentive programs, such as the individual income tax exemption, as well as corporate income tax and import income tax incentives.Previously, the Taxation Directorate General announced it had agreed to grant tax incentives to 360,818 individual and corporate tax payers.Ueno said the majority of Japanese companies expected further tax relaxation measures to be taken if pressures on domestic consumption continued, as well as government-backed compensation to be provided for their employees.“We understand the government is currently in a tough situation. However, support from the Indonesian government is extremely important for Japanese companies,” he said.The government has allocated Rp 695.2 trillion in COVID-19 relief spending to boost the economy and strengthen the healthcare system. This includes Rp 120.61 trillion to provide tax refunds for individuals and businesses affected by the pandemic.As companies are betting on long-term growth, Ueno said swift government action was needed to ensure consumption rebounded in 2020.“If demand fails to recover this year, it’s going to be a tough situation for all companies including Japanese companies in Indonesia,” he said.Previously, Singapore’s largest bank, DBS, stated that Indonesia was still among the preferred Southeast Asian markets for investment, backed by strong household spending and a young working population.In a report titled CIO Insights 3Q20 released on June 29, DBS noted that the country would quickly return to normalcy after the relaxation of pandemic-related restrictions, while household spending – which accounts for more than half of gross domestic product (GDP) – would continue to drive the recovery.“The investment strength in Indonesia lies in its favorable demographics. Indonesia is the third-most populous country in Asia, the fourth globally, and has a high proportion of young working adults,” the report reads.Topics : Japanese companies operating in Indonesia will stick to their future investment plans, despite declines in sales and production due to the ongoing health crisis, a survey conducted by the Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) has shown.The JETRO survey, which illustrates the impact the pandemic has had on more than 350 Japan-based companies operating in Indonesia, shows that due to the pandemic, 80 percent of the companies have seen a decrease in sales, with 37 percent stating their sales had fallen to half their normal levels in this year’s second quarter.Facing such significant declines, 80 percent of the companies surveyed have reduced their production in Indonesia.last_img read more

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Triple treat with views for sale in Murrumba Downs

first_imgTHIS tri-level home is new to the market in the Castle Hill estate at Murrumba Downs. Robin and Rhonda Davis bought 17 Hawkhurst Ct four years ago, when they still had three of their seven children at home. Now that all but one have flown the nest, the couple have decided to sell and downsize. Mr Davis said their six-bedroom home would suit a family or people who liked to entertain. The home is on a 790sq m block with double lockup garage, off-street parking and a wraparound porch.The living areas are on the ground floor and include a formal lounge and dining area and an open-plan kitchen and meals area. The home has a multipurpose room on the top level.One of the bedrooms on this level also has views to Brisbane city. On the top level of the home there is a timber-clad space with views over the surrounding rooftops that could be used as a rumpus room or media room.Mr Davis said his favourite space in the home was the deck.“We live out there a fair bit,” he said. The home is close to schools and public transport. The property is being marketed by Grant Darbyshire of LJ Hooker Kallangur and Murrumba Downs. Expressions of interest are invited. The home has a deck and inground pool.The kitchen has stainless-steel appliances, a breakfast bar and plenty of bench and cupboard space.Mr and Mrs Davis added bi-fold doors to the meals area and a covered timber deck to create indoor-outdoor living. The deck flows out to lawn and the in-ground swimming pool, which has glass fencing and a water feature. Back inside, there is also a bedroom and bathroom on the ground floor. More from newsLand grab sees 12 Sandstone Lakes homesites sell in a week21 Jun 2020Tropical haven walking distance from the surf9 Oct 2019The master bedroom with walk-in robe, reading nook, ensuite and mountain views is on the second level, along with the remaining bedrooms and family bathroom.last_img read more

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Number of DC members in UK shoots up as number of schemes dwindles

first_imgA growing number of participants in UK defined contribution (DC) trust schemes are joining existing schemes or a small number of newer schemes, according to data from the Pensions Regulator (TPR).In its annual market update, TPR said only five additional DC-trust schemes, with 12 members or more, were registered in 2013.However, the total number of members within these schemes grew by 130,000.This growth is driven by schemes with 1,000 members or more, as numbers have fallen in schemes with 12-99 members and 100-999 members, as did the number of schemes. The total number of members in DC schemes grew by 14% to 2.6m, with coverage now accounting for 30% of workplace pension membership, up from 27%.The increases seen in 2013 were expected, with the embedding of auto-enrolment during the year. However, the regulator said this data would not fully reflect this.Because schemes enter their returns to the regulator on a staggered basis, not all new membership is captured in the 2013 report.The schemes with at least 12 members now account for £30bn (€36bn) of pension assets, with growth seen across schemes of all sizes.The number of schemes with 12-99 members has also fallen, with more than 1,000 schemes diminishing over the year.Six additional schemes catering for 1,000 members or more made their way into the industry as well.Only 29% of schemes of these smaller schemes offer a default fund for members, whereas this is the majority of schemes for larger sizes.The regulator’s head of DC regulation, Darren Burton, said TPR’s recent work on its DC code of conduct would ensure good practice and governance across all trust schemes this year.“Automatic enrolment is already having an impact on the DC landscape,” he said. “We are seeing an increase in the number of members, as well as participating master trusts.”last_img read more

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