Nationwide strike paralyzes Greece

Nationwide strike paralyzes Greece

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram A nationwide strike called by public and private sector unions in Greece over the austerity program introduced by the Papandreou Government saw police clash with demonstrators on the sidelines of the rally in Athens.The second general strike in two weeks saw some 25 000 people march in Athens and 10 000 march in Thessaloniki in support of the general strike.The country’s two largest trade union groups, the private sector GSEE and the public sector ADEDY, had predicted a substantial turnout among their two million members.“Today, from all locations in the country, a strong message of unity, struggle and protest is being sent,” the head of the GSEE, Yiannis Panagopoulos said.”Today, Europe’s eyes are turned on us. We ask the government not to give in to the desires of the markets, to set people’s needs as a priority and adopt a mix of economic and social policies that won’t lead to recession but to jobs,” he told the rally.Some protesters carried signs calling on the authorities to “tax the rich” instead and noted that the strike was also targeting “speculators” after a run against Greek bonds that has sharply pushed up the country’s borrowing costs.Others marched with banners criticising the “plutocracy”.“Our people and their needs are above markets and profits,” the General Confederation of Greek Workers (GSEE), which represents around a million members, said in its demonstration call.The ADEDY civil servants union, whose 300,000 members are seen as the main target of the cost-cutting drive, were at the vanguard of the strike action which was also backed by the national journalists’ union.“There is an all-out war against public servants, those who earn the least,” said Spyros Papaspyros president of ADEDY, the national industrialk body for public-sector workers.“We will fight to keep the little we have. The government and the EU must understand the crisis must be paid by the rich.”There have been mixed reactions to the call for the general strike.Michalis Korileos, a 36-year-old civil servant, said he was striking “because others stole the money and we are the ones who are going to pay”.“They are cutting my allowances and I have two children to raise, it is difficult.”However some residents said they saw no reason to strike. “I don’t want to participate,” said Dimitris Makrivellios, 62, a petrol station owner. “Aren’t people also responsible for this situation? Our economy’s problems concern us all. Why should we strike?”While the march was peaceful scuffles broke out between some demonstrators and police as the rally came to an end.About 200 protesters threw rocks, bottles and petrol bombs while riot police retaliated by firing tear gas into the crowds.“A group of youths tried to storm the university building and riot police fired teargas to stop them,” a police official said.The first joint walkout by the two major labour federations was the biggest test to the government’s resolve since it won the election in October.The strike coincided with a visit by EU officials assessing whether Greece is on track to cut its spiraling public deficit, which the Papandreou government has pledged to significantly cut back this year.last_img read more

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Sydney Councils gift to Hellenic Lyceum

first_imgOn the day Greeks all over the world were celebrating their homeland’s Independence Day anniversary, the City of Sydney Council passed a motion for a ‘gift’ to the Hellenic Lyceum, one of the oldest Greek Australian organisations in NSW. The Council unanimously supported a motion put forward by Councillor Angela Vithoulkas “for the council to investigate and identify a suitable space for the storage and display of historic Hellenic Lyceum Greek costumes, jewellery and artefacts”. “Greek Australians are one of the largest and oldest migrant groups in Australia. Hellenic culture has significantly shaped and contributed to the City of Sydney since the 1850s. The cultural history of this diverse group has been lovingly collected and preserved by generations of immigrant women in Sydney since 1951,” said Clr Vithoulkas, who is the first Greek Australian woman elected to the City of Sydney Council. “Victoria currently boasts five Greek (Hellenic) museums, yet there are none in New South Wales. It was therefore important a solution be proposed to assist these women with a short term strategy while they organise a permanent, independent long-term solution for accommodation and display of these works. It’s not only important for Greek Australians, it’s directly relevant to the cultural history of the City of Sydney,” Clr Vithoulkas said. The space to be leased to the Hellenic Lyceum for the next one to three years will probably be the Alexandria Town Hall. A delegation of the Lyceum, including young girls dressed in traditional costumes, was present at the council meeting and applauded the unanimous passing of the motion. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Byzantine Art Architecture

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram The lecture Byzantine Art & Architecture will be given by Dr Ursula Betka as part of season two of Greek History and Culture Seminars 2013. Dr Ursula Betka is currently teaching Art and Cultural history of Medieval Europe and Early Christian Rome & Byzantium at La Trobe university. The seminars are held by the Greek Orthodox Community of Melbourne and Victoria. When: Thursday 11 July at 7.00 pm Where: Kelvin Club, Melbourne Place, opposite the Russell St Greater Union cinemas For more information, contact GOCMV, at (03) 9662 2722last_img

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Court hears of govt bribes

first_imgFormer Defense Ministry official provides damning evidence on bribesEx-Defense Ministry official Antonis Kantas completed his marathon testimony on Monday, giving investigators a wealth of information about alleged kickbacks paid to secure procurement contracts as well as the names of several more suspects, some of whom could be called to give depositions before the end of the year.Court sources told Kathimerini that Kantas gave anti-corruption magistrates Gavriil Mallis and Yiannis Stavropoulos specific information relating to the role of two businessmen in the alleged payment of bribes to Greek officials.Kantas explained how under-the-table payments were made to secure the purchase of German-made Leopard tanks and Type 214 submarines. He also gave background to the deals to buy the German and Swedish-made ASRAD vehicle-mounted short-range air defense system, as well as the Russian-made Kornet missiles and launchers.He gave details on how money ended up in accounts he had opened after being transferred from Swiss and German bank accounts. Sources said the retired official also described how a middleman left a suitcase containing 600,000 euros in cash in his office on one occasion. Magistrates already knew about one of the men alleged to be involved as he was a representative for German companies Rheinmetall and Atlas Elektronik.Kathimerini believes that the man in question is likely to be called to answer questions in the next few days.Kantas was the deputy head of procurements at the ministry between 1996 and 2002. He has admitted that he received around 16 million dollars that had been stashed away in Singapore and Switzerland in return for helping to agree at least 10 arms deals. Source: Kathimerini Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Ronaldo scores Greek isle

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Real Madrid and Portugal football superstar Cristiano Ronaldo has reportedly presented his agent Jorge Mendes with a phenomenal gift for the football agent’s wedding last weekend – a Greek island.Mendes, 49, wed his partner Sandra in Porto. Known as a super agent, the wheeler dealer represents the sport’s biggest names like Jose Mourinho, Angel Di Maria, Radamel Falcao, James Rodriguez and Ronaldo, who was his best man at the wedding.Ronaldo, who is fiercely loyal to Mendes, bought an island in Greece for his long-time confidant, according to Portuguese media source Move Noticias.Greece has a number of its islands up for sale as a result of its crippling debts and Move Noticias said the reigning Ballon d’Or holder took advantage, with the likely price of the purchase ranging from €3 million ($4.5 million) to €50 million.About 400 guests attended the Mendes wedding – including the likes of Real Madrid stars Fabio Coentrao and Pepe.last_img read more

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Papaflessas Social Club commemorates OXI Day

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Melbourne’s Papaflessas Social Club held their annual commemoration of OXI Day last Sunday afternoon at their club rooms in Thornbury. This year’s gathering honoured the personal bond created between the peoples of Greece and Australia in WW2. And it was an opportunity for Papaflessas to be congratulated on its support for the erection of the new Anzac Memorials at Pylos and Methone in May this year. It was my honour to make the presentation at the gathering.I began with the story of Greek Day in Melbourne. Before Australian troops had even set foot in Greece to help in its defence, over 100,000 people had come into Melbourne’s Swanston Street on 14 February, 1941 to take part in Greek Day – a day to celebrate the alliance between Australia and Greece and a day to raise funds to help the civilian victims of the war that had begun with the Italian invasion in October 1940. Melbourne’s fledgling Greek community joined with over 700 volunteers who made the day a great success.These efforts would be reciprocated by the hundreds – if not thousands – of ordinary Greek civilians who gave welcome and support to the Australia troops who came ashore at Piraeus in March and April 1941.One of those who came to Kalamata was Captain Albert Gray from Red Cliffs near Mildura in Victoria, who would take part on the last battle of the Greek campaign on the mainland – the battle of Kalamata waterfront on 29 April, 1941. Leading one of the two groups in the attack on German positions on Navarino Street, Albert was awarded the Military Cross for his bravery that day, New Zealand Sergeant Jack Hinton being awarded the Victoria Cross and Australian Private Max Wood the Military Medal. It was a great pleasure of mine to be able to tell this story to an audience that included three members of Melbourne’s Greek community with strong connections to Albert’s home region – Nola Radiotis, Trevor and Soula Vrettos. I look forward to working with Trevor, Soula and Nola to create greater awareness of Red Cliff’s link to the Battle of Kalamata waterfront.Jim Claven presents Papaflessas Secretary Betty Kosmas with the commemorative posters on the unveiling of the Pylos and Methone Memorials in May 2018.I then spoke of Horsham’s Private Syd Grant who never forgot the support of the local Greek community as he escaped German captivity at Kalamata, finding safety in the village of Trachila in the Mani. It was while there that Syd took a number of memorable photographs, capturing on film the help of the local villagers for the escaped Allied soldiers. Along with other Allied soldiers, Syd was evacuated from Trachila by the British warship HMS Hero and returned to Allied lines. He survived the war and would later name his farm in Victoria – Kalamata – in honour of the Greek people who had helped him. Last month Papaflessas’ own Paul Sougleris was able to identify the hideouts and some of the villagers who helped Syd in 1941 during his research trip to Trachila.The connections between the Messinian region continued after the end of the Greek campaign. Most memorably it was the people of Pylos and Methone who sought to help the over 3,000 Allied soldiers who came ashore after the torpedoing of their Italian POW transport ships, the Sebastiano Veniero At Methone in December 1941 and the Ninio Bixio at Pylos in August 1942. Amongst the hundreds of Australian soldiers aboard was one young Essendon-born engineer, Sapper Bill Rudd who had long sought to have erected memorials to both these tragedies. And so it was that late last year Papaflessas joined with Melbourne’s Panpyliaki Brotherhood Navarino and helped make Bill’s dream a reality. In record time the Pylos and Methone Memorial plaques were created, transported to Greece and installed by the Municipality of Pylos-Nestor in prominent locations. It is only with the support of Papaflessas and its membership – along with that of Navarino – that these important new additions to Greece’s emerging Anzac trail could be created and erected.On behalf of Anzac veteran Bill Rudd, I thanked the community for their support.Melbournians line Swanston Street during Greek Day celebration on 14th February 1941. Photo: The Argus (Melbourne), 1941, with colour added. State Library of Victoria Collection, Ref H98.100/3448.I also outlined that work that is being undertaken by other representatives of Melbourne’s Greek community organisations to expand Greece’s Anzac Trail. Along with the Lemnos Gallipoli Commemorative Committee’s erection of the Australian Pier Memorial at Mudros on Lemnos, I am working with Melbourne’s PanKorinthian and PanArgoliki communities to commemorate a number of important Anzac sites across the region that have no memorial. These include the site of the Battle of Corinth, where Australian and New Zealand troops played an important role in the valiant defence of the Corinth Canal in April 1941 and the Church in Argos where Australian and other army nurses sought sanctuary and safety from German air attack during their retreat to the evacuation port of Nafplio in April 1941. These are only two of a number of important Anzac related sites across the Peloponnese being researched for new memorials – watch this space.Litsa Athanasiadis gave a brief address on the success of the George Treloar Memorial Committee, whose successful community fundraising will see a major new memorial erected to Ballarat-born Major George Devine Treloar who assisted over 100,000 Christian refugees to settle in Greece following the Asia Minor catastrophe. Litsa invited all present to attend the unveiling of this commemoration of an Australian who played such an important humanitarian role in the history of modern Greece.The event concluded with an address by Ms Kosmas who spoke of how she was moved by the presentation on the personal aspect of the Hellenic link to Anzac. She thanked all for attending this important and emotional event.* Jim Claven is a trained historian, freelance writer and Secretary of the Lemnos Gallipoli Commemorative Committee. He can be contacted by email at jimclaven@yahoo.com.aulast_img read more

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Who is the Cypriot serial killer who murdered foreign women

first_imgCypriot Army officer Nicos Metaxas, 35, has killed at least seven women in the island nation creating a huge stir among the police, and resulting in the resignation of the country’s Justice Minister Ionas Nicolaou on the grounds of “political responsibility” for the case.The killer targetted foreign women who came to Cyprus for work, and whom he met on social media networks. Though he has admitted to killing seven, the authorities have reopened missing persons investigations and have a list of 22 names of women presumed to have left the country but had been reported as unaccounted for.His own mother was a foreign woman, a Bulgarian woman from Stara Zagora. His parents had divorced 12 years ago.He himself was also separated from his wife, but is not divorced, and has two children. By all accounts he is a responsible father.His hobbies include photography and he has had exhibitions featuring his work, and has participated on TV shows. Photographic images of the mines where he dumped the women were among his belongings.His motives for the crimes still remain unknown. The police are not aware whether he targeted foreign women for a specific reason or because he considered them easy hits.The murders have cast the spotlight on the conditions of foreign workers in Cyprus, with the BBC publishing a scathing report on the abuse of migrant women. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Mykonos taverna slapped with 12 tax infringements following social media criticism

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram A taverna that had been shamed on social media for overcharging a party of tourists was visited by tax inspectors this week.The officials found that the restaurant, located at Platis Gialos on Mykonos, was in violation of 12 tax rules.The inspection came following a scathing review on TripAdvisor by an American tourist. The visitor, a Brooklyn-based soldier, posted a photograph of the receipt showing that his party had been charged 836.20 euros for a meal of salad, calamari and beer.He wrote: “AVOID THIS PLACE AT ALL COST! No pun intended.”READ MORE: Tourist trap on Mykonos: 836.20 euro-bill for calamariThe photo of the receipt went viral with scathing reports from around the world slamming the restaurant for overcharging the tourists.last_img read more

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Bisphénol A des risques sanitaires réels

first_imgBisphénol A : des risques sanitaires réels ?Canada – Selon les récentes recherches du ministère de la Santé canadien, la nocivité du bisphénol A serait bien réelle. Omniprésent dans les emballages alimentaires, ce plastique inquiète les scientifiques, qui se demandent quels risques sanitaires il peut représenter.En 2008, le ministère de la Santé canadien avait déclaré que le bisphénol A, utilisé dans la fabrication de nombreux emballages alimentaires et des biberons, n’était pas toxique. Il a, depuis, revu son jugement. Le bisphénol A parviendrait en effet à s’accumuler dans le corps humain, un phénomène particulièrement vrai pour les femmes enceintes et leur foetus. En effet, les scientifiques ont prélevé le placenta de cinq femmes immédiatement après qu’elles ont accouché et l’ont ensuite exposé au bisphénol A. Les résultats sont plus que révélateurs : cette substance endommagerait gravement et irrémédiablement les cellules du placenta.Selon Aziz Aris, médecin au département d’obstétrique et de gynécologie de l’université de Sherbrooke : “Un centième de ce qui a été trouvé dans le sang des femmes enceintes peut être nocif au fœtus”. Cette exposition pourrait entraîner une pré-éclampsie (une pression artérielle grave pour le foetus), une naissance prématurée, voire une fausse-couche.À lire aussiUne femme donne naissance à un bébé cyclope en EgypteLe bisphénol A est pourtant présent dans de nombreux emballages en plastique comme certains emballages de plats cuisinés, des boîtes de conserve et surtout, des biberons. Il entraînerait chez l’adulte une augmentation de la sensibilité à la douleur, des inflammations et une réduction de l’imperméabilité de l’intestin.Le bisphénol A est identifiable dans les emballages grâce aux codes de recyclage 3 et 7, toutefois, il serait quasiment impossible de l’éviter tant il est omniprésent. Le 18 janvier 2010 à 10:55 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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Découverte en images un oiseau fossile au bec acéré battant tous les

first_imgDécouverte en images : un oiseau fossile au bec acéré battant tous les records d’envergureChili – Deux chercheurs ont publié dans le Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology leur analyse d’un nouveau fossile découvert au Chili : celui d’un oiseau marin de 5 mètres d’envergure, au bec armé de “dents” et capable de voler. Le plus grand de sa catégorie trouvé jusqu’à présent. Un bec étroit doté de projections osseuses ressemblant à des dents, et surtout des ailes de 5,20 mètres d’envergure : telles sont les principales caractéristiques de ce squelette fossilisé, complet à 70% et presque intact, découvert au Chili. Il s’agit d’une nouvelle espèce d’oiseau marin âgée de 5 à 10 millions d’années, baptisée Pelagornis chilensis. Appartenant au groupe des Pelagornithidae ou “oiseaux à dents osseuses”, il est le plus grand de cette famille – et le mieux conservé – découvert jusqu’à présent.  À lire aussiLes oiseaux communiquent entre eux depuis l’oeufLes auteurs de l’étude, le Dr. Gerald Mayr, du muséum Senckenberg de Francfort-sur-le-Main (Allemagne) et le Dr. David Rubilar, du Musée National d’Histoire Naturelle du Chili, insistent sur l’intérêt du spécimen, non seulement sur le plan paléontologique, mais aussi pour une meilleure compréhension de la biomécanique du vol des oiseaux, notamment des contraintes anatomiques chez les oiseaux volants de grande taille.  Découvrez P.chilensis en images :  https://www.maxisciences.com/pal%e9ontologie/p-chilensis-un-oiseau-fossile-de-5-metres-d-039-envergure-au-bec-pourvu-de-dents_art9298.htmlLe 21 septembre 2010 à 15:47 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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