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Is testing my core processor enough to pass a disaster recovery test?

first_img 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Just as there are thousands of types of potential disasters (Man-made, Environment/Natural, Cyber and Technical), there are equally as many variants possible to test your disaster recovery plans. And because the complexity of your infrastructure continues to evolve it is difficult to determine what to test and how to test it! In working with hundreds of credit unions each year, it is quite common for me to see that most credit unions focus their Disaster Recovery (DR) testing energy on the core transaction processor. That’s one test. What about your delivery channels (ATMs, Online Banking, Shared Branching, etc) or critical business processes such as payroll and cash management?  Can you start to see where the “One DR test per year” approach to may be inadequate and/or perhaps even negligent in today’s high risk environment?I can almost hear what you are thinking  – “great …. more testing” (imagine this drawn out in the infamous voice of the boss from Office Space – That’d be grreaaatt.)And I get it – between operational duties, continuity planning, security implementation/testing  and compliance/regulatory checklists – you are tapped out! continue reading »last_img read more

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Borne Out Of Racism, Defiant AME Church Preaches Social Justice Through Gospel

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York [dropcap]D[/dropcap]iane Gaines took her usual position along the pews inside Bethel African Methodist Episcopal church in Babylon.The last few days had been a whirlwind, with Gaines taking calls from members of the community lobbying her to continue the job she had been doing for more than 15 years. Meanwhile, her own thoughts had become clouded as she nervously contemplated her future.Gaines was in need of a sign, a gentle nudge that would help put her mind to rest. She wanted to follow her heart, but she knew the road would be turbulent and laden with pitfalls.She wheeled herself into church that Sunday in October 2010 with her eyes wide open.Gaines had already been through a gauntlet of obstacles. A popped blood vessel in her spine at 24 years old has relegated her for the rest of her life to a wheelchair. Then came a breast cancer diagnosis at age 40.Gaines, a single mother of three, pushed on. Her faith never wavered. If this was His plan, then so be it. She’d accept the mission He had set forth for her.But Gaines’ journey hit a roadblock in 2010 when the Nassau County-based Women’s Opportunity Resource Center (WORC), which she served as executive director, was shut down by its parent organization, Education and Assistance Corporation (EAC) due to a lack of funding.For 25 years, the program helped downtrodden women who had been in and out of trouble with the criminal justice system receive vital services in order for them to effectively re-enter society, possibly earn a GED, perhaps enroll in college, and hopefully land a job, support a family. Some had been sexually and physically abused in the past. The emotional scars ran the gamut. They were drug dealers and drug abusers. Many others made a career out of petty crimes.WORC’s mission was simple: reduce recidivism and help women climb out of a dark and lonely abyss through vocational training, educational courses, workshops, counseling, health services and emotional support.Gaines lamented what would happen to destitute Long Island women if WORC ceased to exist. Convincing people to fund the program would be a tireless endeavor, yet something was pushing her toward reviving it.About one month after WORC shut down, Gaines decided to stop worrying and instead put all her faith in God.Peering at the pulpit that Sunday, Gaines recognized the youth pastor preaching that morning as the son of a WORC graduate. What some would consider a coincidence, Gaines interpreted as divine intervention.“I can’t run from this,” she recalled.The next day Gaines got to work. After registering WORC with the Nassau County Clerk’s office, she headed over to Fulton Avenue in Hempstead to inspect an unoccupied office space. The landlord inquired about her budget. She didn’t have one, Gaines admitted.“I have God,” she told him.ResistanceDiane Gaines, executive director of WORC, helps women who have been incarcerated get back on their feet. Gaines visited the African American Museum of Nassau County on Aug. 27 to accept a $55,000 grant from the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)Gaines, who had been raised Catholic, discovered the African Methodist Episcopal church two decades ago. She made the switch after a professional mentor suggested she attend a service at Mt. Olive AME church in Port Washington—and she’s been hooked ever since.The AME church has been in existence for more than two centuries, quietly going about its business spreading the Gospel worldwide and helping improve the communities its members call home. The first AME church was founded by a free slave in Philadelphia shortly after the official end of the American Revolution. The church’s congregation now numbers three million people—spanning 39 countries on five continents.Suddenly the church’s bucolic lifestyle was interrupted on June 17 when bullets violently began flying inside Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C., the oldest AME church in the South, during Bible study. When the alleged gunman finally ended the carnage, nine lives had been lost, with the church’s venerable pastor among the dead.Dylann Storm Roof’s motives were made clear by his venomous justification for the rampage.“You are raping our women and taking over the country,” Roof reportedly told one of his victims inside the historic church during the slayings. On Sept. 3, prosecutors in Charleston announced they’d be seeking the death penalty.A supposed manifesto reportedly posted on a website registered by Roof last February paints a disturbing portrait of a man painfully uncomfortable living in an America where the KKK has largely become irrelevant and hate-fueled attacks by other disciples are, in his view, too infrequent.“I have no choice,” it reads, according to The New York Times. “I am not in the position to, alone, go into the ghetto and fight. I chose Charleston because it is most historic city in my state, and at one time had the highest ratio of blacks to Whites (sic) in the country. We have no skinheads, no real KKK, no one doing anything but talking on the internet. Well someone has to have the bravery to take it to the real world, and I guess that has to be me.”Fueled by racism, Roof allegedly slaughtered nine God-loving people after an hour of Bible study—a common event held every Wednesday at each AME church in the country.AME members of Long Island were just leaving Bible studies of their own when news of the bloodshed began to surface.“I felt violated,” 64-year-old Anita Scott says inside Bethel AME Church in Freeport. Scott was raised in the AME and has family in South Carolina.“This is my home,” she says on a quiet summer day inside Bethel. “I felt like someone had come in there and raped us…I just wonder: How can someone raise their child to hate?”The mass murder sent a shockwave across LI, which is home to 14 AME churches—seven each in Nassau and Suffolk counties, including Bethel Copiague, where congregants will celebrate its 200th anniversary this month. LI is also home to St. David AME Zion church in Sag Harbor, a defunct AME church built in 1840 that is rumored to have been a stop on the Underground Railroad and housed a trapdoor that once hide slaves. Its pastor at the time was also a noted abolitionist, according to historians.The AME church has always been a symbol of black resistance, says Rev. Craig Robinson, pastor of AME Bethel Church in Bay Shore. Therefore, it’s not out of the question that one of its churches would be used to hide blacks from their slave masters. (The existence of the Underground Railroad on LI has been the subject of much debate.)The murderous rampage on a summer evening in Charleston evoked visceral reactions and brought back memories of the church’s birth in the late 1780s (the exact date is unknown), when white Methodists insisted that blacks move to the back of St. George’s Methodist Church in Philadelphia. But it was Richard Allen’s act of defiance at the end of the 18th century that laid the groundwork for the eventual formation of the AME church. Allen, a revered black preacher and member of St. George’s, decided to lead a walkout, a pivotal moment in the history of black resistance.Richard Allen founded the first AME Church in Philadelphia after he was told he could no longer worship at St. George’s Methodist Church. He is also considered one of America’s first black activists.Ever since Richard Allen preached his religious views to a new congregation, the AME has been at the forefront in the fight for equality. Allen, a former Pennsylvania slave, had already earned his freedom. He had become a roving Methodist preacher, touring southern states, creating a burgeoning following, and inspiring destitute slaves and free blacks alike.Regarded as one of the country’s first black activists, Allen refused to live a compliant life. He saw the church—an independent black church, more accurately—as a place of refuge and a spiritual haven, where blacks could pray freely and speak openly, without resentful stares from white Methodists.“The existence of the African Methodist Episcopal Church is a glaring example of black resistance to racism, to oppression,” says Robinson.The mass murder of the “Emanuel 9” at the hands of a man allegedly motivated by his hatred toward blacks spawned yet another national conversation about America’s deep-seated racism. During his eulogy of Rev. Clementa Pinckney, the Mother Emanuel pastor and South Carolina state senator killed in the rampage, President Obama referenced the Confederate flag, revered by many in the South as a symbol of their heritage.“Removing the flag from this state’s capitol would not be an act of political correctness; it would not be an insult to the valor of Confederate soldiers,” Obama told a packed audience in Charleston on June 26, six days after the shooting. “It would simply be an acknowledgment that the cause for which they fought—the cause of slavery—was wrong, the imposition of Jim Crow after the Civil War, the resistance to civil rights for all people, was wrong. It would be one step in an honest accounting of America’s history; a modest but meaningful balm for so many unhealed wounds.”The shooting did more than just cause blood to spill, tears to cascade for days, and stir emotional debates on race, guns, and, most passionately, the Confederate flag. The tragedy also served as a reminder of the AME church’s vital role as a champion of black rights and as a leader in the community.AME congregations nationwide form a tight-knit community made up of deeply devout parishioners who make it their mission to use the church to improve the lives of people in their respective neighborhoods. For decades, generations of AME members have seen racism firsthand. Mother Emanuel itself had to be rebuilt after it was burned to the ground in the 1830s amid controversy over a foiled slave revolt instigated by Denmark Vesey, one of the church’s co-founders.“At the heart of Allen’s moral vision was an evangelical religion—Methodism—that promised equality to all believers in Christ,” writes Richard M. Newman in Freedom’s Prophet, recognized by some as the definitive biography on Allen’s life. “Indeed, one of Allen’s best claims to equal founding status was his attempt to merge faith and racial politics in the young republic.”Visit an AME church on any Sunday and you’ll typically find a motivated congregation that utilizes Scripture and sermons as tools to better their neighborhoods. Many AME churches operate food pantries, youth groups, a women’s missionary society, health programs, Alcoholics Anonymous, and a bevy of other vital social programs. Those with larger congregations may offer more expansive services; sometimes they collaborate.“We’re not insulated; we’re not boxed in,” says Rev. Stephen Lewis, pastor of Bethel AME Church in Freeport. “We’re bold enough to go outside and invite people.”The AME church is constantly looking outward, says Margaret Davis, first lady of Bethel AME church in Babylon.The AME church is “like the fueling station where you get the gasoline that you need,” says Davis. “Get pumped and go on out there and make the cycles and change lives.”Voice of the VoicelessRev. Lisa Williamson, the pastor of Mt. Olive AME Church in Port Washington, with parishioner Edith Hall holding a framed photo of the nine people killed at Mother Emanuel AME Church in South Carolina in June. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)The pastors who lead congregations on Long Island have traveled very different paths to get where they are now, but they all share common goals.Rev. Lewis, the pastor at Bethel AME Church in Freeport, arrived from northern Pennsylvania. Rev. Keith Hayward, originally from Bermuda, has been the pastor of Bethel AME in Copiague for the last three years. Prior to his arrival, he also pastored a church in Pennsylvania. Rev. Dr. Lisa Williamson of Mt. Olive AME in Port Washington previously served at Trinity AME in Smithtown. Born in Venezuela, she’s grown fond of her small church on a quiet, idyllic tree-lined street in Port Washington.Rev. Craig Robinson, 29, arrived in Bay Shore last year. The sprawling South Shore hamlet feels very much like his hometown of Ferguson, Mo., Robinson says, adjusting his tall, burly frame as he relaxes in the front pew inside Bethel AME Church in Bay Shore.The unassuming church sits adjacent to the Long Island Rail Road tracks and is less than a block from bustling 2nd Avenue. With its vaulted ceilings and ubiquitous stained glass windows, the unpretentious 150-year-old AME house of worship evokes its humble beginnings. The ground beneath it trembles as trains shriek east and west, an omnipresent rat-a-tat often adds to the soundtrack of Robinson’s Sunday sermons.After entering the church and getting a sense of his surrounding, Robinson called his mom back home in Ferguson and reported the eerie similarities between Bay Shore and his hometown: large groups of people struggling to get by, dilapidated cookie-cutter houses dotting the neighborhood, families scrounging for food. But like Ferguson, Bay Shore has its wealthy parts, mostly waterfront properties boasting dazzling views of the Great South Bay.Ferguson, a St. Louis suburb, was the site of intense protests following the police shooting death of Michael Brown in August 2014. Robinson eventually moved to St. Louis, where he attended St. James AME Church. He was only 17 when he first began preaching.In June 2014, an AME bishop appointed Robinson as the pastor of Bethel AME Church in Bay Shore. In order to be ordained, a prospective AME pastor is required to earn a master’s degree in divinity. Pastors are then appointed by bishops for one-year terms and are either reinstated or reassigned to a different AME church, perhaps in another state. Pastors never know if they’ll lead a church for more than a year.As with anyone coming into a new neighborhood, the pastors try to ascertain the makeup of the community and the issues people face. Robinson realized quickly that the church’s food pantry helped shine a light on families stricken by poverty.A black ribbon hangs outside Mt. Olive AME Church in Port Washington in remembrance of the nine people slain during Bible study in South Carolina.The issues facing other communities are not much different.When Williamson arrived in Port Washington she realized there was an affordable housing problem. The pulpit provides Williamson with a powerful megaphone that allows her voice to be heard, but it’s her ability to go outside the church and speak with community leaders and public officials that helps bring issues out of the darkness and into the sunlight.“Every good preacher should have a Bible in one hand and a newspaper in the other hand,” Williamson says.When a member of the Port Washington Police Department unfurled a Confederate flag outside his house on the Fourth of July holiday, Williamson invited members of the community and the police commissioner to the church for a frank discussion on the flag’s presence in their neighborhood, which attracted a small but passionate group.“A lot of the people went to school with him,” Mt. Olive AME member Edith Hall tells the Press. “They felt really hurt because they knew this officer.”“I don’t think they fully understand what that flag represents and that’s something we did at that meeting,” adds Williamson. “One young woman gave the history [of the Confederate flag], and through the history she explained why when we see it, all these emotions come up. If I see a Confederate flag my impression is you do not care for me as an African American.”Among her duties, Williamson says, is establishing a working relationship with the Port Washington Police Department, which is headquartered less than a mile south of Mt. Olive.“As a pastor, we know you have to establish a relationship with law enforcement, unfortunately because of the history,” Williamson tells the Press.“Social justice, community activism,” she adds, “that’s what we were borne out of. And with the climate in the country now, we’re even getting ready to do it on a much larger scale.”Long Island has a long history of racial tension. One of the largest KKK rallies outside the South took place in Nassau in 1922, according to The New York Times. Two years later, some 30,000 spectators watched 2,000 robed Klansmen parade through Freeport. Those unresolved issues linger on today.A report published by the Syosset-based nonprofit ERASE Racism in January found that LI remains one of the most segregated regions in the country, with “segregation between blacks and whites remaining extremely high and segregation between Latinos, Asians and whites increasing.” The same report also noted that only 3 percent of black students and 5 percent of Latino students have access to the highest performing schools in Nassau and Suffolk counties, compared to 28 percent of whites and 30 percent of Asian students.There’s also the ongoing issue of affordable housing. Last year, the US Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against the Town of Oyster Bay, alleging that it violated the Fair Housing Act by giving preference to residents of the town, which is majority white. That same summer a Mineola landlord agreed to a $165,000 settlement in a case in which he was accused of discriminating against blacks. Two nonprofits, including ERASE Racism, sent both black and white “testers” to the complex and had them inquire about vacancies. The black tester was told there were no rooms available, yet four hours later the white tester was shown an available one-bedroom apartment.AME pastors relish the opportunity to be more than just religious leaders confined within the walls of their church.“I came with this mindset: I was not sent to just pastor Bethel church, I was sent to pastor this community,” says Hayward, who was assigned to Bethel AME in Copiague in January 2012.Pastors like Hayward say they’re following the path forged by Allen more than two centuries ago.“If there’s legislation in this community that is not for the holistic healing and development of people, you will hear my voice,” Hayward says recently from across a large brown desk inside his spacious office at Bethel AME in Copiague. “If the school district is not providing our children the holistic education and the procedures and protocols are not correct, they will hear my voice.”‘To Strengthen Those Things That Remain’Rev. Keith Hayward outside historic Bethel AME Church in Copiague. The church will be celebrating its 200th anniversary this month. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)Celebrating its 200th anniversary this month, Hayward’s church does everything from holding toy giveaways and fundraisers to hosting Alcoholics and Narcotics Anonymous meetings on Wednesdays, running a weekly GED program in partnership with SUNY Farmingdale, and a two-hour seminar about diabetes every Tuesday for six weeks in the fall. And that’s not all.Hayward is especially proud of the “Fatherhood Initiative,” which he instituted upon his arrival in Copiague. The six-week program reconnects troubled fathers with their children following a protracted separation, perhaps due to incarceration or a frayed relationship, whatever the reason. The results have been “phenomenal,” so far, Hayward says with pride.“Some of the men have been back here on a Sunday morning and have had their children with them,” he says. “Even the mothers of the children are more appreciative of the fact that the fathers are more engaged in their children’s lives.”Hayward always keeps his ear to the ground. The pastor recently learned of an illiterate 9-year-old boy.“That was grievous to me,” he says, struggling to hide his displeasure. Hayward immediately set a goal to have the child reading before classes resumed this fall.The child had slipped through the cracks because of troubles at home, but the church stepped in to fill the void that the school district had been unable to.“He’s not at the point where we can’t reach him,” Hayward says.Hayward could very well be the unofficial mayor of Copiague, and Bethel AME its city hall. His influence is everywhere: the county legislature, judicial system, police, school districts, neighboring businesses (Toys ‘R’ US donates to the church). Bethel AME now has 325 congregants, up from about 100 before Hayward was appointed pastor. Bible study attracts on average 110 people each week.Hayward’s church was initially founded in Amityville in the 19th century but has since moved to neighboring Copiague. The church still owns its original property on Albany Avenue as well as an adjacent cemetery, where the last burial took place in 1897, he says. These days the parcel where the original church once sat is vacant but the community takes advantage of the open space for recreational activities.There’s a piece of Scripture in the Book of Revelations that Hayward lives by: “To strengthen those things that remain.” In Hayward’s case, it’d be the community that he’s hoping to uplift.“I base my ministry on that one Scripture,” he says.It’s social outreach projects like these that are happening all the time at AME churches across the Island.At Bethel AME in Freeport, Lewis speaks proudly of “Joshua Generation,” a program designed to reach young people in the community. More than 50 youngsters visit the church on Friday nights, he says, “because, really, they have nowhere else to go.”Instead of roaming the neighborhood, they take part in physical and educational activities, participate in Bible study, and, if someone in the community has been generous with donations, travel to sporting events in the area.“We keep them involved,” Lewis says.AME’s faithful take pride in the work they do outside the church.Diane Gaines was able to re-establish WORC in 2010, using her savings to pay for rent in Hempstead and reaching out to members of the church and public officials for support. She was able to secure thousands of dollars in funding from the AME church through a Women’s Missionary Society program dubbed “Project Possible.”Several years ago, then-Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice provided WORC, which was renamed The Woman’s Opportunity Rehabilitation Center, with a $20,000 grant from the office’s asset forfeiture fund—money seized during investigations. That number jumped to $50,000 last year, Gaines says in her fourth floor office along Franklin Avenue in Hempstead.Gaines is sitting in her wheelchair, her phone constantly ringing and the sound of students and volunteers scurrying in and out. It’s a busy Thursday morning in late August at WORC. The small group of volunteers is hastily preparing for an event at the African American Museum of Nassau County, the only such museum in the Northeast, where acting Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas will be on hand to award WORC a $55,000 grant.Gaines wheels her way through the museum across the street and gazes at the crowd. The room is lined with enlarged U.S. Postal Service stamps of prominent blacks. There’s one of Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Ella Fitzgerald and Rosa Parks. Judging by the celebrity-like reaction she inspires from friends and admirers, Gaines could one day bless that very same wall.“Anyone who meets Diane can’t help but be impressed by just her enthusiasm and her advocacy and her passion and commitment to women,” Singas tells the crowd of about 30 people. “It’s contagious.”The DA’s office is in the unique position of trying to help the very people it’s supposed to prosecute—that is, coordinating with the criminal justice system to provide alternatives to incarceration to women charged with low-level offenses.“We think of our office as a place where we can be sort of proactive,” Singas tells the Press. “We put a lot of our money into crime prevention, so a lot of these programs with women and younger offenders and young children—they have to pay their debt to society but at the same time they don’t have to wear this as a stigma for the rest of their lives.”Aside from helping women who previously have been incarcerated, WORC often takes in women—with the help of the DA’s office and Nassau County judges—as an alternative to incarceration.“I’ve seen lives changed,” Joyce Lewis, an AME member and WORC volunteer, tells the Press.Students who previously looked lost now “have a shimmer of hope,” she says, adding: “Selfishly I would like to see fast growth, but I’ve seen seeds planted, I’ve seen hope, and I’ve seen the chance for a change.”“I know this is the work that God called me to do,” Lewis beams.Much of the credit goes to Gaines, WORC volunteers and former students say.“My life has changed dramatically because of the WORC program,” says Victoria Roberts, who graduated WORC after a 13-year battle with drugs and now works as Nassau County’s Reentry Coordinator, which helps individuals get back on their feet after state incarceration.At one point, Roberts was homeless, out of work, and lost her two kids to foster care. She’s fought tirelessly since. She turned her life around, got her children back, has a home.“I owe it all to Ms. Gaines,” she says of her success. “She [has] three daughters but she has a multitude of daughters. There are many women who can stand up here and tell stories similar to mine and we owe it all to Ms. Gaines.”When Wendy Priester first met Gaines she was a mess, battling anger issues. After one day at WORC she told Gaines not to expect her back. She ended up returning the next day.Gaines helped her find a part-time job, she tells the audience, tears streaming down her cheeks. Finally, everything started falling into place.“I’m about to buy my first house,” she says, the room erupting in applause.With tears surging and her voice cracking, Priester turns toward Gaines and leans in for a hug.About a dozen AME members are in attendance, many of whom are WORC volunteers.Gaines asks them to stand up to be recognized for their work.She then asks a man named Johnny to sing one of her favorite songs. He doesn’t hesitate.“I won’t complain,” he sings, as his voice begins to soar. “Sometimes the clouds hang low. I’ve asked the Lord why so much pain. He knows what’s best for me. These weary eyes, they can’t see, so I’ll say, Thank you, Lord! Thank you, Lord! I won’t complain.”It’s easy to understand why Gaines chose that song.“She’s such an inspiration,” says Jacqueline Watkins, 72, of Amityville, another AME member. “I’ve never heard her complain. Always positive. I lost my husband just about three years ago; she was always encouraging to me.”Gaines, who is affectionately known as “Ms. Gaines,” credits her faith and the AME church.“I just believed that this was a mission from God,” she says, back inside WORC’s Hempstead office. “That God wanted me to do this.”“I would not have re-established the WORC program without my faith,” Gaines says, reflecting on that life-changing Sunday at Bethel AME in Babylon.“It’s my faith that keeps me going now.”It’s that faith AME members turned to on the night of June 20.Faith and PoliticsRev. Craig Robinson considers slavery America’s original “birth defect.” Robinson, the pastor of Bethel AME Church in Bay Shore, grew up in Ferguson, Missouri, the cite of often intense protests following the police shooting death of Michael Brown. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)The Sunday following the Charleston slayings, Rev. Robinson stood at the pulpit with a heavy heart and raised a litany of questions swirling through the minds of millions of members worldwide:“Why did it happen?”“Why that church?”“Why such violence?”“Why such hate?”“Why?”To find the answers, Robinson says that all one has to do is peer into America’s past.“For what we have witnessed in the massacre at Mother Emanuel is in my estimation history’s chickens coming home to roost,” he told his congregants.“We have seen this before in the treatment of slaves on Southern plantations,” he added. “We have seen this before in the bodies that were lynched and mutilated and burned from America’s inception up into the early parts of the 20th century. We have seen this before in the removal of Africans from their motherland, in the removal of Native Americans from their ancestral land, by force if necessary… We have seen all of this before.”Robinson was conducting Bible study the evening bullets rang out inside Mother Emanuel.One glance at his phone afterward prompted a whirlwind of emotions: first confusion and disbelief followed by extreme anguish.As he absorbed all that had transpired that evening, Robinson couldn’t help but recognize the feeling that was sinking in.“I think I felt the same way about this that I did with Trayvon Martin,” Robinson says. “I think it’s just the pervasive presence of violence against the black community, black bodies, black institutions.”“And so you both have a deep emotional connection with all of it,” he adds. “Whether it’s Trayvon Martin or Eric Garner or any of those people, you feel a sort of personal connection. But then you also have a somewhat sort of numbness to it because you’re very clear of the history that much of this violence is rooted in. And so…you’re sort of lamenting, you’re sort of calling God into question publicly as well as praying for hope.”The self-effacing pastor portrays a calm demeanor amid heightened tension in black communities. Robinson has preached about the deaths of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Akai Gurley, as well as the tragic slayings of two NYPD officers fatally shot in an ambush last December, which further inflamed the political discourse. His sermons are a collection of current events woven within Holy Scripture reflecting God’s will.“The shooter had much to draw on as material for how he would dispense his brand of hatred,” he tells his congregation. “And if we are going to move forward from this together, people of all walks life, all ethnicities and races must come and talk truthfully about these issues and facts. The fact that America, in all its ideals, has an underside, and that place has been where the oppressed, including many in the black community, have found themselves for centuries.“There are tons of raw material for our shooter to draw on,” he continues. “But there are some deeper issues than just our history. The other question that comes up in my mind is: What happened to his heart? What happened to make this man so callous in the execution of his mission? What happened that made him forsake the voice of reason and good, the voice that told him not to shoot because these people were so nice to him? What happened to his heart, his compassion, his basic humanity?”Robinson has a lot to say, even when the pews are empty.“Like in most of these places, whether it’s Charleston or Bay Shore or Ferguson, the issues far predate anybody that has the wherewithal to try to change it,” Robinson tells the Press. “When you’re talking about a Confederate flag, even though the Confederate flag has a bunch more recent history, you know, you’re talking about a history of racism and slavery and the dehumanization of an entire group of people that spans 300 years. You can’t just undo 300 years of history.”Rev. Hayward agrees.The pastor was traveling on the New Jersey Turnpike when news reports of the horrific slayings came through his radio. Two hours earlier, Hayward was also teaching Bible study.“That hit me in a way that I’ve never felt,” Hayward says of the bloodshed.He talks about a persistent “racial divide” in the country, how when Africans were taken from their homelands they were transformed into slaves. He recalls the time Richard Allen was told, “You’re no longer allowed to pray at this altar.”Still, he keeps his faith.“So, when this young man set out to do evil, God has turned it around for good,” says Hayward. “He has brought people together in South Carolina that had not embraced each other before.”Hayward may take his cues from God, but he finds inspiration in how people have reacted since the shooting.The number of people who attended Bible study at Mother Emanuel skyrocketed to 250 in the weeks after the attack, he explains.“Love wins,” he says.People who never had shown interest in the AME church have now become members, Hayward says.“Love wins,” he repeats.“The church was born out of racism, Mother Emanuel the struggle and challenges they’ve been through was out of injustice and racism,” Hayward adds. “Bethel Church in Copiague dwells in a community that has racial divide and hate. I’ve met some phenomenal Caucasian men and women on this Island that have become good friends—there’s another side to this. Love wins.“When we show love, we produce love,” he continues. “I think that what we need to do is look at the value of individuals. What if God treated us the way we treated ourselves? But because he doesn’t, love wins—every time.”Similarly, Rev. Williamson of Mt. Olive in Port Washington went to church on the Sunday following the massacre planning to deliver a message of hope. Peruse the Bible and you’ll find something in the text that helps you find a way to overcome tragedies, she says.Williamson is not surprised that a half-century since the Voting Rights Act and Civil Rights Act were signed into law that blatant racism still exists.The AME church was born out of racism, she says, echoing Hayward, therefore it knows how to respond to hate. And it will continue do so, whether it’s inside the hallowed walls of its churches or at community forums and at demonstrations.“What we’re doing now,” she tells the Press, “is we’re responding in a much more organized and political way: to say after the cameras are gone and it’s no longer a headline story, we’re still going to hold this nation accountable to 42 million of its citizens.”,Alure cube,Alure cube,Alure cubelast_img read more

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Big drama at Fontwell as six disqualified | Racing News

first_imgThe stewards inquired into the race, interviewing Tudor along with fellow jockeys Jerry McGrath, Brendan Powell, Lucy Gardner, Harry Reed, Tabitha Worsley, Niall Houlihan and Fuller, plus the clerk of the course, the racecourse head groundsman and an additional member of the groundstaff.Having heard all the evidence and viewed recordings of the incident, the stewards revised the placings to make Dharma Rain the winner and only finisher, with all other runners, barring Bluebell Sally who was pulled up, disqualified for taking the wrong course.However, no penalties were imposed on any riders as the stewards took into account “the poor visibility, and the illusion that the chevrons had been placed in the hurdle – which was caused by the chevrons being carried across the course behind the hurdle, which gave riders’ cause for concern for the safety of all involved”.A report will be forwarded to the head office of the British Horseracing Authority. “I jumped it, but it was very unclear. The others missed it, but I could see that the markers were behind the hurdle, so I went with my gut instinct and jumped it – but it was very unclear.”Page Fuller, who was in the leading group on her mount Queen Among Kings, added: “The horse broke down at the hurdle, I was further back in the field and from where I was, the markers looked like they were in the hurdle.“But once we’d gone round the hurdle, you could see they were past the hurdle. There was a flag being waved and the markers looked as if they were in the hurdle, but until you got around the hurdle, you couldn’t see they (markers) were behind.”- Advertisement – Dharma Rain was declared the winner of the final race at Fontwell after the first six horses home were all disqualified for failing to jump the third-last hurdle.Nine horses went to post in the “From The Horse’s Mouth Podcast” Mares’ Handicap Hurdle and while Just Henny came home first, the race was awarded to Dharma Rain, who was seventh of eight finishers, but the only runner to complete the course.- Advertisement – Winning jockey Jack Tudor felt the situation had been “unclear” during the race, with the racecourse’s groundstaff appearing to be in the process of dolling off the third flight from home on the final circuit due to a stricken horse.The first seven riders seemed to think the markers were in position and duly veered around the hurdle, although Tudor, who was at the back of the field, was not sure and jumped the obstacle, resulting in victory for Clare Hobson’s runner.“It was made very unclear, it wasn’t done brilliantly at all. It looked as if the markers were in the correct position, it was a 50-50 call, but I went with my gut instinct,” Tudor told Sky Sports Racing.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Pennsylvania Governor Wolf Statement on Expected Resignation of Rep. Charlie Dent

first_imgPennsylvania Governor Wolf Statement on Expected Resignation of Rep. Charlie Dent SHARE Email Facebook Twitter April 17, 2018center_img National Issues,  Press Release,  Statement Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today thanked U.S. Representative Charlie Dent for his service to the country and commonwealth following his announcement that he would resign from Congress in May.“Charlie Dent is a voice of reason and civility that breaks through the chaos and partisanship of Washington and he will be missed,” Governor Wolf said. “I thank Representative Dent for his service to our country and commonwealth. While we do not agree on everything, Charlie has always been approachable, and he has always put his constituents above partisan politics. I am proud to have worked with Representative Dent to make improvements in the Lehigh Valley and advance our constituents’ shared interests in Washington.”Once Governor Wolf receives an official resignation notice with an exact date, he will make a formal decision regarding scheduling the date of a special election.Pennsylvania’s Election Code requires the governor to issue a writ when the vacancy occurs during a session of Congress or if the vacancy occurs at a time when Congress shall be required to meet any time prior to the next general election. The governor must issue the writ within 10 days of the vacancy to set the special election date. The date of the election must not be sooner than 60 days after the governor issues the writ. Candidates would be nominated by the parties in accordance with party rules. Political bodies may nominate by circulating and filing nomination papers. The winner of the special election fills the balance of term.last_img read more

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Kenneth Wayne Robert Monjar, 62

first_imgMr. Kenneth Wayne Robert Monjar, age 62, of Vevay, Indiana, entered this life on July 2, 1953, in Clermont County, Ohio, the son of the late, Harley Joseph Monjar, Jr. and Georgia Martha (King) Monjar Sexton. He was raised in Clermont County, Ohio where he attended high school. Kenneth served in the United States Air Force. Kenneth was employed as a Mechanic for McQueen Brothers in Saint Petersburg, Florida for 10 years. He also repaired boats and worked for Saint Petersburg Ship Company and Indian Rocks Beach Ship Company. Kenneth resided in the Switzerland County community since 1995. Kenneth will be remembered for his love of being a mechanic and tinkering with classic cars. Kenneth passed away at 12:11 pm, Saturday, March 5, 2016, at the King’s Daughters’ Hospital in Madison, Indiana.Kenneth will be missed by his brothers: Jerry Monjar & his wife: Rose of Quercus Grove, IN & Larry Monjar & his wife: Ann of Patriot, IN; his sister: Sylvia Pagliaro of Bethel, OH & his aunt: Genevieve “Babe” Schmaltz of Milford, OHHe was preceded in death by his parents: Harley Joseph Monjar, Jr., died December 23, 1989 & Georgia Martha (King) Monjar Sexton, died June 3, 1996 & his sister: Linda Monjar, died in 1958.Friends may call 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm, Wednesday, March 9, 2016, at the Haskell & Morrison Funeral Home 208 Ferry Street Vevay, Indiana 47043.Memorial contributions may be made to American Cancer Society or to the Switzerland County Emergency Response. Cards are available at the funeral home.last_img read more

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Napoli close on Boga agreement

first_img Loading… Napoli are reportedly close to agreeing terms with Sassuolo for Jeremie Boga, making up the €40m asking price by including Adam Ounas. According to Tuttosport, the winger has long promised himself to Napoli to be part of coach Gennaro Gattuso’s 4-3-3 formation. The personal terms are a five-year contract worth €2.3m per season. The issue had been negotiating a transfer fee with Sassuolo, who have requested €40m to sell the former Chelsea talent.Advertisement read also:VAR Palaver: Chioma Ubogagu cautions players on African image It’s reported in Tuttosport that the deal can be done for €25m cash plus ownership of Algeria international Ounas. Ounas spent last season on loan with Nice and had been linked with Lille as part of the Victor Osimhen move. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Promoted ContentBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show You7 Mysterious Discoveries Archaeologists Still Can’t ExplainThe 10 Best Secondary Education Systems In The WorldA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic BombsThe 10 Biggest Historical Mysteries That Can’t Be SolvedBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them10 Phones That Can Work For Weeks Without RechargingTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The World10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?last_img read more

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Ryan McLaughlin joins Aberdeen on loan from Liverpool

first_imgAberdeen have signed Northern Ireland right-back Ryan McLaughlin on loan from Liverpool. Manager Derek McInnes told the club’s official website: “I’m really pleased we’ve managed to bring Ryan to the club. He’s a player who has always impressed us and will give us good options in the months ahead. “Ryan has the quality needed to play with us at Aberdeen and we are looking forward to working closely with him. Ryan’s eagerness to join us over others also gives us great encouragement.” The 20-year-old made nine appearances on loan at Barnsley last season and joins the Dons until January. McLaughlin watched Aberdeen maintain their perfect record in the Ladbrokes Premiership on Saturday with a 2-0 victory over Partick Thistle. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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President Trump to Sign Executive Order Protecting Monuments

first_imgProtesters clashed with police on Monday in a park near the White House as they tried to tear down a statue of Andrew Jackson, the nation’s seventh president.Police moved into Lafayette Square with reports of pepper spray being used to clear the crowd.President Trump took to Twitter to say that “numerous people” had been arrested for what he called “disgraceful vandalism” of the “magnificent Statue of Andrew Jackson.” He suggested prison sentences of ten years. #BREAKING: Protesters have opened the fence surrounding the Andrew Jackson statue in Lafayette Square and have climbed on top. I’ve heard them say they’re trying to tear it down. @wusa9 #BlackLivesMatter pic.twitter.com/i8cBlM171b— Jess Arnold (@JessArnoldTV) June 22, 2020 Monday night, hours after Arroyo interviewed Trump, a group of protesters attempted to pull down a statue of Andrew Jackson in Washington D.C.’s Lafayette Park before being pushed back by police. President Trump will soon issue an executive order to protect public statues and monuments from being damaged or destroyed by far-left and anarchist protesters.“We are going to do an executive order and make the cities guard their monuments,” “This is a disgrace.” are Trump’s words.It’s about time DC police showed up to stop the mob. If Muriel Bowser won’t allow the police to do their job, @realDonaldTrump should deploy federal law enforcement to protect this 168-year-old statue and every other landmark in our nation’s capital. https://t.co/J6RUDTEbYh— Tom Cotton (@TomCottonAR) June 23, 2020center_img It will be interesting to see how the federal branch can impose its will on these cities and municipalities. Far-left activist Shaun King on Monday said all images depicting Jesus as a “white European” should be torn down including stained glass adorning churches. Yes, I think the statues of the white European they claim is Jesus should also come down. They are a form of white supremacy. Always have been. In the Bible, when the family of Jesus wanted to hide, and blend in, guess where they went?EGYPT!Not Denmark.Tear them down.— Shaun King (@shaunking) June 22, 2020last_img read more

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The Latest: Auburn president says school will play football

first_imgThe Latest: Auburn president says school will play football In a statement, Dowden says soccer authorities need to finalize their plans before government approval will be given for leagues to start up again.Players are still having to maintain social distancing in training, but contact is expected to be allowed if there is no new spike in COVID-19 cases nationally.___IndyCar officials have announced NBC will air a four-hour program on May 24, the original date of this year’s Indianapolis 500, that will look back at last year’s race.Mike Tirico will interview race winner Simon Pagenaud and runner-up Alexander Rossi during the broadcast. Conference commissioner Jim Schaus said league presidents had approved a cost-savings plan for the 2020-21 academic year. Schaus said staff at the conference office will have reduced travel going forward and their salaries will be frozen.___More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6 ___Orlando became the latest NBA team to reopen its practice facility since the coronavirus shutdown, with Nikola Vucevic among the first Magic players to arrive back for voluntary workouts Thursday.The Magic released video of Vucevic working with assistant coach Lionel Chalmers, who was in a mask and gloves for the session. The NBA requires anyone who is present for the workouts, except for the player while he is working out, to be wearing personal protective equipment.“It felt good to be back here and get some work in,” Vucevic said afterward in a message distributed by the team. “But I still want you guys to stay safe, be smart, listen to the experts. It’s still a dangerous time for everybody. But be safe, listen to the experts and I’ll see you soon.”Vucevic was averaging 19.5 points and 11 rebounds per game for the Magic when the NBA season was suspended March 11. Associated Press This year’s Indy 500 has been rescheduled for Aug. 23.“While this Memorial Day weekend will certainly be different, we’re pleased to join our partners at NBC Sports in continuing this tradition through this special TV presentation,” Penske Entertainment Corp. CEO Mark Miles said in a statement. “We look forward to recognizing both our military and frontline COVID-19 heroes while providing motorsports fans some intense and behind-the-scenes IndyCar action through the race replay.”Pre-race coverage will include honoring frontline workers during the pandemic as well as the military traditions associated with the 500. The program also will preview this year’s season opener, which is scheduled for June 6 at Texas.___The Baltimore Ravens intend to compensate stadium workers if NFL games are played before a limited numbers of fans — or no one at all — due to social distancing requirements during the coronavirus pandemic. The Netherlands on April 24 became the first top-tier European league to cancel the remainder of the season. But clubs that felt disadvantaged by the terms immediately announced plans to launch legal battles.___The British government says it is helping the Premier League resume in June but it wants the finances to flow throughout English soccer and more fans to be able to watch games on television.Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden held talks on Thursday with soccer authorities as the national coronavirus lockdown starts to be eased. The pandemic will continue to prevent any fans from attending matches if sports events do restart in June after being suspended in March.Dowden says “the government is opening the door for competitive football to return safely in June. This should include widening access for fans to view live coverage and ensure finances from the game’s resumption supports the wider football family.” The tour will announce the 2021 schedule later this year.___Spanish second-division club Elche says its players have agreed to return to training after it reinstated their full-time work contracts.Club CEO Patricia Rodríguez told Spanish news agency EFE Thursday that after negotiating with the squad, the club had agreed to end the work furlough it had been on for two months since the coronavirus pandemic put all league activity on hold.The players did not return to practice on Wednesday as a protest against salary reductions of 70% imposed under the furlough. Many Spanish clubs have put their players on furlough. The top two clubs in the second-tier Keuken Kampioen Division, Cambuur Leeuwarden and De Graafschap Doetinchem, launched a legal challenge to the April 24 decision, seeking to seal promotion in court.In a ruling streamed live Thursday, Judge Hans Zuurmond rejected their arguments, saying the Dutch association, the KNVB, has the power to make such a decision.Zuurmond says because of the coronavirus, the KNVB “had to take a decision with its back to the wall. Doing nothing was not an option.”According to the ruling, the KNVB had to act in the interest of all clubs. Zuurmond says it is “very bitter for Cambuur and De Graafschap, but that is not enough to overturn the decision.”The decision marked the first time a court has ruled in a legal challenge to a one of the major European leagues’ coronavirus stoppages. Ravens president Dick Cass says the team is working on a program to provide for the estimated 3,300 people employed a typical game day.“If we don’t have that kind of staff because we have a reduced crowd at the stadium, we are planning on creating an employees’ assistance fund,” Cass said, noting that “we have not terminated or laid off or furloughed anybody and we don’t intend to.”Instead of watching from the sideline at a minicamp practice, Cass was in his home Thursday morning, speaking in a teleconference arranged by The United Way. He noted that in a normal year on this date, there would be 90 players having breakfast at the team headquarters.Cass said the team sill plans to open training camp and start the season on time, but it “may have to make adjustments.”___ The then-Ohio State president was criticized in 2010 for saying TCU and Boise State didn’t belong in the BCS title game even if they ran the table because of weak schedules, referring to lesser opponents generally as “Little Sisters of the Poor.” In 2012 he took a shot at Notre Dame in a meeting of Ohio State’s athletic counsel, saying that the school was never invited to join the Big Ten because its priests are not good partners. “Those damn Catholics” can’t be trusted, he said.He later apologized.___A judge has upheld the Dutch soccer association’s decision to scrap relegation and promotion from or to the top-flight Eredivisie as it cut short the season due to the coronavirus pandemic.center_img Milwaukee Brewers general manager David Stearns says he hopes a potential return of Major League Baseball from a pandemic-imposed hiatus could “provide a diversion” and be “part of the solution to what everyone is going through right now.”Stearns emphasized that it would need to be done “in a safe and responsible manner.”“The truth is we don’t know what scenario is coming,” Stearns said Thursday outside a hospital as the Brewers helped donate meals to hospital workers.“We will be prepared,” he added. “If we get the go-ahead from public health officials, if we get the go-ahead from governmental officials, if the necessary agreements can be reached, we will be prepared and we’ll get it going.”The Brewers are working with other companies and local firefighters to help provide 1,000 meals to workers at Milwaukee-area hospitals. Stearns spoke after food was given to employees at Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center. Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditThe Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:___Auburn University President Jay Gogue predicts the Tigers will play football this season. Gogue told incoming freshmen in a video Wednesday, “We’re going to have football this fall.”Gogue didn’t offer any details in the short video about how the games would be played and did not discuss whether fans would be in the stands. But the Auburn president predicted the coronavirus pandemic won’t keep the campus from having “all the activities that we have every fall.”He said Auburn will reopen classes on campus and have fraternity and sorority and club activities.The Southeastern Conference has formed a task force of medical professionals from the 14 member institutions to discuss the best ways to resume sports.___ The Southeastern Conference has formed a task force to advise the league and member schools on decisions about resuming sports amid the coronavirus pandemic.The SEC’s Return to Activity and Medical Guidance Task Force represents the league’s 14 universities.The group of medical professionals began meeting by video conference in April, the SEC said Thursday. They provide regular updates to SEC presidents, chancellors and athletic directors.Conference members will have to approve any policy changes related to a return to practices, workouts, meetings and competition.SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey said the task force “has begun to provide the guidance necessary to make decisions related to the return to athletics activities for SEC student-athletes and to assist in our collaboration with colleague conferences in determining a safe return to athletics competition.” ___West Virginia University president E. Gordon Gee vows that the Mountaineers will play football this fall “even if I have suit up.”“I’ve got my ankles taped, I’m ready to go in,” the 76-year-old Gee joked in an interview with WOWK-TV broadcast this week. “But I think again, with everything we’re going to do it based on what is safe, what is healthy for our fans and what is healthy for our student athletes. But I do believe that we will play football.”Despite uncertainly around the coronavirus pandemic, all Big 12 schools, including West Virginia, plan to open campuses for the fall semester, a key step toward launching fall sports.It’s not the first time a statement by Gee has turned heads. ___The PGA Tour Champions, which already has canceled eight tournaments because of the COVID-19 pandemic, has decided to combine 2020 and 2021 into one season.Tour president Miller Brady says combining two seasons into one is the best solution.The 50-and-older circuit is scheduled to resume with the Ally Challenge in Michigan on July 31. That would be the first of 13 events remaining this year, barring any delays. The PGA Tour Champions already has lost two majors, the U.S. Senior Open and the Senior PGA Championship, and is waiting to hear the fate of the Senior British Open.Because of the combined seasons, the postseason events will have 81-player fields and a Charles Schwab Cup champion will not be decided until 2021. The IOC says it is setting aside $800 million for loans and payments arising from the pandemic that forced the 2020 Tokyo Olympics to be postponed.International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach says $150 million will be available for loans to sports governing bodies and national Olympic committees. They were due payments this year for the Tokyo Games, which are now scheduled to open in July 2021.IOC chief operating officer Lana Haddad says a breakdown of how the $650 million could be allocated will be formulated in the months ahead. It was unclear how much of the money would go to Tokyo organizers.The Swiss government announced Wednesday that Olympic sports federations based in the country can apply for federal loans. The IOC will put up half the money for those loans, with federal and state authorities providing 25% each.___ Spanish clubs have returned to training individually at club facilities as they wait for the league to resume play, possibly this summer.___The Southern Conference will cut back on schools qualifying for several championships, cut its league baseball series from three games to two and hold virtual media days for football and basketball.Those are among several cost-cutting moves announced by the conference because of the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.The Division I conference will reduce qualifiers to four for men’s and women’s soccer, volleyball, men’s and women’s tennis, softball and baseball. May 14, 2020last_img read more

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What to look out for on streaming this March

first_img“Spenser Confidential” “Self Made: Inspired by the Life of Madam C.J. Walker” (Tiffany Kao | Daily Trojan) Netflix If you’re a fan of cheesy romantic reality shows and the ABC hit “The Bachelor,” your next binge-worthy show might have just popped up on Netflix in mid-February. The reality dating series follows a group of singles in Atlanta tasked with dating one another without ever meeting face-to-face. Until they decide whether or not to take the next step in their relationships and get engaged to a person they’ve never seen, the singles must get to know each other through deep conversations about love and life in an unusually fast-paced timeline. It’s not too late to start the show if you haven’t done so yet, as their reunion special is due to air March 5.  Netflix “Little Fires Everywhere” Coming out March 6, this film is set to be an action-filled comedy thriller. Loosely based on Ace Atkins’ novel, “Wonderland,” an ex-police officer and ex-con team up in an attempt to unveil a murder conspiracy about the deaths of two Boston cops. Together, they take on the bad guys and form an unlikely bond that plays on themes of family and brotherhood. Netflix’s original movies have proven to be successful hits among audiences and the buzz about this one has yet to die down. If you’re also a fan of Mark Wahlberg, Winston Duke or Post Malone, you should keep an eye out for this one. “Blow the Man Down” “Love is Blind” This new drama series, which follows the story of America’s first female millionaire and self-made African American entrepreneur and businesswoman, C.J. Walker, is coming to Netflix March 20. Octavia Spencer, known for her roles in “The Help,” “Hidden Figures” and “The Shape of Water,” takes the role of Sarah Breedlove, a woman who rises from poverty and builds an empire around hair care. The trailer reveals that the series will be inspiring and thought-provoking, and is bound to leave you eager to start watching. center_img March is finally here, and spring break is on the horizon for the Trojans. Not only is spring break the perfect time to take a breather from your assignments, essays and midterms, it’s also a great time to sit back, relax and get caught up with the most anticipated releases from your favorite streaming services.  Amazon Prime Netflix  “Blown the Man Down,” which will come out March 20, is a must-see for indie film lovers. With an offbeat noir plot, directors Bridget Savage Cole and Danielle Krudy make their debut with this twisted tale set in a small seaside fishing town in Maine. The film has been nominated for multiple awards at different festivals, including Best Screenplay in a U.S. Narrative Feature Film at the Tribeca Film Festival which it won. The two female filmmakers fantastically merge wit, dark comedy and crime in the movie. “Blow the Man Down” is an artistic cinematic experience with an odd but compelling storyline.  Hulu “Making the Cut” For the fashion and design connoisseurs and fans of shows like “Next in Fashion” and “Project Runway,” “Making the Cut” will give you the full fashion competition drama you’ve been looking for. Launching March 27, “Making the Cut” features a panel of five famous judges, including model Naomi Campbell and television personality Nicole Richie. Twelve entrepreneurs and designers come together from all around the world in a fight to build their brands and take home a $1 million prize to invest in their budding businesses. For “Project Runway” lovers, you know that the dynamic duo, Heidi Klum and Tim Gunn, left the show to pursue their own reality fashion TV series and well, good news, it’s finally coming to your screen this month! Amazon Prime The anticipation behind this yet-to-be-released eight-episode limited series starring Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington is coming to a close as it is set to launch on Hulu March 18. Its trailer draws viewers in immediately as Elena Richardson’s (Witherspoon) house burns down. The psychological- mystery narrative involves the Richardsons, a mother-daughter duo and a wealthy, picture-perfect family, who find their lives intertwined by fate in an unexpected way. The series is based on the bestselling book, “Little Fires Everywhere,” by Celeste Ng and has been on the lookout by fans since the announcement of its adaptation by Hulu in 2018. Watch the trailer if you haven’t because it will be a drama worth the wait.last_img read more

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