爱上海,上海419论坛,上海龙凤419 - Powered by ecxqdsuqk

Observer staff honored at ICPA conference

first_imgThe Observer took third place in the Division I “Newspaper of the Year” category, and former Managing Editor Sarah Mervosh won the Brook Baker Collegiate Journalist of the Year Award at the Indiana College Press Association (ICPA) awards ceremony, held Saturday at Ball State University in Muncie. The Observer staff won an additional 15 awards, including third place for “Advertising Publication of the Year.” Other University publications represented at ICPA were Scholastic, which tied with Ball State’s Ball Bearings for second place in “News Magazine of the Year,” Dome, which won second place in the Division I “Yearbook of the Year” category and The Juggler, which took third place in “Literary Magazine of the Year.” Mervosh is the third Notre Dame student to win the Brook Baker Award, which was first awarded in 1999 in honor of the late Vincennes University student. The Editorial Board of The Observer took first place in the “Best Staff Editorial” category for its Nov. 10 piece, “Professionalism and integrity above all.” Former Assistant Managing Editor Adriana Pratt won first place in “Best Entertainment Column” for her coverage of the New York premiere of the final Harry Potter film, titled “The Magic of a Potter Premiere.” Scene Editor Kevin Noonan took third place in the same category for his column titled “A ‘Dear John’ Letter for Netflix.” Former Scene Editor Maija Gustin won first place for “Best Entertainment Story” for her coverage of an on-campus presentation of a documentary on the Nuremberg Trials, titled “Schulberg presents ‘Nuremberg’ years after its creation.” In the same category, senior staff writer Mary Claire O’Donnell took second place for her article about a Notre Dame engineering alumnus who is also a published author, titled “ND grad explores storms and struggle in fiction work.” Former Editor-in-Chief Douglas Farmer and Graphics Editor Brandon Keelean won first place for “Best Rate Card” for the design of The Observer’s advertising rate card. Farmer and Keelean also took second place in the “Best House Ad” category for their ad titled “The Observer Remembers.” Mervosh won second place in the “Best Breaking News Story” for her coverage of graduate student Xavier Murphy’s October death, “Community remembers fifth-year student.” She also took third place for “Best News Feature” for her piece on the 10-year anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, titled “Malloy, graduates remember ‘somber’ 2001 environment.” The Observer staff won third place for “Best Stand-Alone/Pullout Section” for its special section on the 10-year anniversary of 9/11, titled “9/11: Ten Years Later.” Keelean, Mervosh, former Photo Editor Pat Coveney and Managing Editor Megan Doyle also took third place in the “Best Informational Graphic” category for their accompanying 9/11 timeline. Multimedia Editor Sarah O’Connor won second place for “Best Feature Photo” for her photo from Girl Talk’s concert at the B1 Block Party concert in August. The sports department took third place in the “Best Special Issue” category for its Oct. 21 Irish Insider profiling the football team’s night game against USC, titled “The Wait is Over.” Editor-in-Chief Allan Joseph won third place for “Best Sports Column” for his piece “After all the hype, Irish weren’t even close” after the football team’s 31-17 loss to USC on Oct. 22. The Observer’s award-winning submissions are available on its website, www.ndsmcobserver.com.last_img read more

Read More

Patti LuPone is Absolutely Terrifying in New Penny Dreadful Clip

first_imgBroadway legend Patti LuPone guest stars on this week’s Penny Dreadful, and we have never been more scared. In the flashback episode, the two-time Tony winner plays The Cut-Wife, a cottage recluse who helps Vanessa (played by Eva Green) control her special abilities. Spoiler: the lesson involves Patti LuPone slapping the crap out of her (it’s a big week for that). Take a look at the clip below, and catch Penny Dreadful on Showtime on May 17. We can only hope that LuPone will lighten up in Lincoln Center’s Shows for Days next month. Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 23, 2015 Shows For Days View Comments Related Showslast_img

Read More

Presidential push may kickstart Indonesian transition from coal to renewables

first_imgPresidential push may kickstart Indonesian transition from coal to renewables FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Mongabay:President Joko Widodo has reportedly expressed his intention to wean Indonesia off coal, in a move that runs counter to his own administration’s stated policy of increasing the country’s reliance on the fossil fuel.The president made the announcement at a July 8 cabinet meeting, according to Siti Nurbaya Bakar, the minister of environment and forestry. “[T]he president emphasized that we must develop the energy sector with a focus on renewable energy,” Siti said at a recent event in Jakarta. “Therefore, the president has explicitly asked to ‘start reducing the use of coal.’”If the administration follows through on the statement with concrete policies to phase out coal use, this could signal the beginning of a transition to renewable energy for Indonesia, the largest energy consumer in South East Asia and one of the biggest consumers of coal in the world, analysts say.But any meaningful change will have to start with an overhaul of the electricity procurement plan, or RUPTL, by the state-owned utility, PLN. At present, the RUPTL calls for increasing the absolute figure for renewable power generation over the long term, but shrinking its share of the overall energy mix in favor of more coal-fired electricity.The ideal plan would have to offer both fiscal and non-fiscal incentives that would lower the price of renewable power to make it competitive with coal, said Elrika Hamdi, an analyst at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA). “What’s also important is that the policies taken should be consistent and in effect for a long time in order to give assurance to investors and funders,” she added.Indonesia is currently one of the world’s biggest CO2 emitters, most of it from deforestation and land-use change. However, emissions from the energy sector are poised to dominate in the near future as Indonesia’s demand for electricity continues to rise. The country’s energy consumption growth is among the fastest in the world, with coal accounting for nearly 60 percent of the energy mix in 2018. Its energy policy therefore has important implications not just for the country’s climate future, but also for global efforts to achieve cuts under the Paris Agreement.More: Indonesia’s president signals a transition away from coal powerlast_img read more

Read More

Croatia charges 9 with smuggling cocaine from Caribbean

first_img ZAGREB, Croatia — Nine people were charged with smuggling at least 175 kilos (386 pounds) of cocaine worth several million euros into Europe from the Caribbean, prosecutors said on April 14. The charges included buying “large quantities of cocaine” in the Bahamas and the Dominican Republic, then transporting the narcotics on a private plane before selling them in Croatia and western European countries, the national anti-organized crime bureau (USKOK) said. The nine charged were five Croatians, two with dual Canadian-Croatian nationalities, one Colombian and another person holding both Serbian and Bosnian citizenships, according to USKOK. The network was dismantled when Austrian police allegedly caught two of the suspects with over 101 kilos of cocaine worth about €4 million (US$5.23 million). [AFP, 14/04/2012; Eubusiness.com (Croatia), 14/04/2012] By Dialogo April 16, 2012last_img read more

Read More

Developing leaders and embracing change

first_img 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Lorraine Ranalli Lorraine Ranalli is Chief Storyteller & Communications Director, as well as published author. Her most recent work, Impact: Deliver Effective, Meaningful, and Memorable Presentations, is a pocket book of public … Web: LorraineRanalli.com Details Imagine being asked by the top brass of an organization to develop and facilitate for its esteemed leadership team a training program focused on change management, only to discover through post-training follow-up that despite giving the program excellent reviews, neither the executive staff nor members of the leadership team incorporated an ounce of the program into their management practices. It is not uncommon that even the heads of organizations who recognize a need for change are often among the most change-averse within an organization. Ironically, research suggests that organizational change is most palatable when leaders are seen as change agents, effectively modifying their own behavior before demanding others do so.Lee Hecht Harrison(LHH) helps companies around the globe transform their leaders and workforces so they can accelerate performance. Their recent Workforce Transformation study reveals 70% of organizations around the globe identify advances in digital technology as the primary external factor driving change and 59% identify increased use of digital technologies and automation as an internal catalyst for change.Regardless of the vehicle driving change, if change is inevitable how can it be presented in a way that employees will cotton to it?It comes down to leadership and the culture established at the top.Solutions might be found in Behavioral Economics, which according to Investopedia is the study of psychology as it relates to the economic decision-making processes of individuals and institutions. The theory is that understanding rational behavior does not necessarily lead to it because humans are emotional beings, able to be persuaded by shiny objects or well-spun data. The paradigm is one on which advertisers focus to maximize results. It would seem obvious that leaders of organizations, who are typically results-oriented, would be open to change, and many are. The problem is that rarely do they see the need to change themselves. Instead, many think change should happen at the next level down and that all will be well if everyone else simply follows their edicts. Ah, the human factor emerges again.According to LHH’s findings, 85% of employers around the world are concerned that their leaders are not capable of transforming their workforces to meet the needs that will ensure future success. Forbes Councils Member Nadir Hirji reports similar findings. He says getting buy-in from management is among the top three causes of change aversion. Hirji also cites technology as a leading driver of the need for change. He says that because digital transformation has no endpoint, organizations are under constant pressure to adopt new business models and refine their processes.Having been established under the precept that change is constant could be why some 21stCentury organizations adapt more readily to technological changes compared to organizations that struggle to remain relevant in the digital age. Remaining entrenched in 20thCentury business models is a death knell. Kudos to staples like Colgate, Brooks Brothers, Pfaltzgraff, and dozens of other organizations that have flourished for hundreds of years because of their ability to adapt to new technologies.Culture eats strategy for breakfast every day!According to the LHH study on Workforce Transformation, while primary change drivers are technological, the most important challenges are not. Workplace culture is the key to successful change implementation. The study reveals that resistance to change is a nearly universal challenge to most transformation initiatives. Fifty-four percent of respondents identify cultural inertia and resistance to change as the number one barrier to workforce transformation. Lack of a disciplined approach, mediocre leaders, lack of an overall strategy and vision, and the absence of a strong leadership pipeline round out the top five barriers. This is where strategy meets culture.Hirji recommends focusing on change enablement rather than change management. Executives with whom he spoke recognize that ongoing success comes down to people and culture. Strategy and culture are mutually influential. To address the challenge of cultural resistance to change, LHH recommends objectively defining current culture, and then creating a vision for the ideal culture. Empower those responsible for championing change and set clear expectations and measurable goals. The idea is to embrace change.Leaders can make or break culture; therefore, it is imperative to put the right people in the right seats on the bus—to borrow a chapter from Jim Collins’ “Good to Great.”Focusing on people and culture is a concept that is not missed on job seekers, either. A recent Wall Street Journal report reveals culture ranks nearly as high as salary on a list of prospective employees’ most important considerations. The need to attract and maintain the best talent is yet another reason for organizations to regularly test their cultural waters and adjust accordingly.The other Fish PhilosophyWhile many professionals are familiar with the workplace culture established at Seattle’s famous Pike Place Fish Market, the more commonly known philosophy associated with sea creatures is the adage, a fish rots from the head down. An organization’s tolerance for change comes down to leaders who are ready rather than reactionary.According to LHH’s findings, leadership capability is a major theme differentiating high-performing organizations from low-performers. If a majority of organizations recognize a need for change and a deficiency in the quality of leadership necessary to drive change, where is the weak link? The answer lies in training and development. The study finds that 91% of organizations are not meeting employees’ development needs, thus impeding innovation and growth.Take a look at how HR professionals rate their organization’s employee development:90% identify a lack in meeting career development needs91% identify a lack associated with providing tools and resources necessary to reskill and realign roles to meet organizational needs13% say they successfully train managers to hold effective career conversations with direct reportsThe findings indicate that fewer than half, just 40%, of organizations fill open positions with internal candidates. That means a majority of organizations not only lack the talent pool needed to grow, but they also are failing to leverage existing talent to meet emerging business needs. The solution is to embrace quality training programs. Consultation from an outside organization will ensure objectivity. Sure, there are costs involved but they are minimal compared to the costs associated with employee turnover and low morale.Just one more thing (cue: Columbo)Imagine a well-oiled business led by quintessential servant leaders, from the C-suite through middle management and supervisory staff. Growth is steady, employee turnover is remarkably low, and the applicant pipeline is miles long. Strategists prepare for outside influences that will impact internal operations, yet every now and again, some necessary changes are met with resistance by even the most contented employees. If not handled appropriately, implementing change even in a seemingly perfect environment can cause unwanted disruptions in morale and flow. The solution here is to establish consistent communication processes. In conjunction with quality training, communication from the top down is most effective when these 5 Cs are employed: clear, concise, complete, correct, and courteous.To protect the bottom line and keep it growing, leaders need to demonstrate enthusiasm for change, embrace opportunities associated with workforce transformation, and communicate a vision for success. Authentic buy-in at every level will abet smooth transitions and accelerate growth. The workforce transformation process is strategic, according to LHH, and it involves planning, developing, and redeploying employees to ensure companies have the critical skills and capabilities to help drive business forward. By its very definition, transformation implies many moving parts. In business, successful transformation requires an integrated approach that includes people, processes, systems, and technology.last_img read more

Read More

Avian flu virus found in another Texas flock

first_imgJun 24, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – Avian influenza cropped up in a flock of 14 poultry about 4½ miles from where two large commercial chicken flocks were destroyed because of the same virus in May, the Texas Animal Health Commission said (TAHC) yesterday.The flock of 10 chickens and 4 ducks tested positive Jun 22 for an H7N3 virus, the same strain that led to the euthanization of 48,000 breeding chickens in the area recently, the TAHC said in a news release. The small flock was immediately destroyed and burned, and additional testing of flocks in the area will now be necessary, officials said. The birds had shown no signs of illness, TAHC spokeswoman Carla Everett told CIDRAP News.”This turn of events is disappointing to us and the area’s poultry growers, but it demonstrates why widespread, repeated flock testing is necessary during an AI outbreak,” Dr. Max Coats, deputy director of the TAHC’s animal health programs, said in the news release. “This infected flock was one of more than 315 in a 300-square-mile area that tested negative a little more than two weeks ago.”Coats said the second round of testing in the area was nearly finished when the National Veterinary Services Laboratory reported the test results on the small flock. Some flocks in the area will have to be retested again to assure trading partners that the disease has been eradicated, he said. In addition, the surveillance area will have to be changed, because the testing protocol calls for testing within 10 miles of an infected flock, he added.Routine blood tests revealed the H7N3 virus in the two commercial flocks, which had not shown signs of illness. No other infected flocks had been found in the area until this week.last_img read more

Read More

A deal between Friends

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Read More

South Korean conglomerate donates $255,000 worth of medical equipment to Indonesia

first_imgTopics : The Investment Coordinating Board (BKPM) will distribute the donations gradually over the next 20 days. Meanwhile, the rapid test kits are expected to arrive later this month from South Korea.”This is a real symbol of the close ties between Indonesia and South Korea,” BKPM head Bahlil Lahadalia said in a statement on Monday. “The BKPM will help with the distribution so that medical staff and app-based ojek drivers affected by the COVID-19 outbreak can benefit accordingly.”CJ Indonesia, which has operated in the country since 1988, joins other companies in donating medical equipment amid the unfolding pandemic. The BKPM previously received 50,000 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing kits from another South Korean conglomerate, LG Group.Hospitals across the country are in need of medical supplies and test kits as the number of infected patients continues to rise amid calls for more aggressive testing. Official figures showed that more than 4,500 people have contracted COVID-19 in Indonesia, with the death toll reaching nearly 400. “As we forge relations with the BKPM and Indonesia during our 32-year operations, we have a sense of belonging and togetherness,” said CJ Indonesia business development director Wahju Onasis. “We want to help ease the burden caused by this outbreak.Two-Wheeled Movement Union (Garda) leader Igun Wicaksono added: “The donations we received today [Tuesday] from CJ Indonesia and the BKPM will be of great help to us — the app-based motorbike taxi drivers who have suffered as a direct impact — to support our daily operations.”Read also: TikTok donates Rp 100 billion for COVID-19 medical workersApp-based ojek taxi drivers are among the vulnerable groups that have been hit the hardest by the government’s social restriction policy to contain the spread of the virus.According to Online Driver Association (ADO) head Wiwit Sudarsono, drivers’ earnings have plunged nearly 80 percent, especially for those who usually transport passengers.A report by big data firm Statqo Analytics showed that Grab and Gojek had seen a 16 and 14 percent downturn, respectively, among their active ride-hailing users within the last week of March. A significant drop was seen on March 19, three days after schools and many businesses closed to prevent the spread of COVID-19. CJ Indonesia, the local arm of South Korean conglomerate CJ Corporation, donated on Monday rapid test kits and hand sanitizer worth Rp 4 billion (US$255,000) to healthcare facilities and app-based motorcycle taxi drivers, as demand for these crucial items remains high in the fight against COVID-19.The company, which manages bakery franchise Tous Les Jours, among other businesses, has prepared 1,000 bottles of hand sanitizer, 200,000 pieces of bread and 200,000 milk packages to be distributed to state-owned hospitals and community health centers (Puskesmas) handling COVID-19 patients, as well as ojek drivers impacted by the government’s large scale social restrictions.Read also: COVID-19 news is not all bad. Read this to stay positive Editor’s note: This article has been revised to reflect that the donation worth US$255,000.last_img read more

Read More

Governor Wolf Welcomes New PASSHE Chancellor Daniel Greenstein

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Governor Wolf Welcomes New PASSHE Chancellor Daniel Greenstein Education,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Marking a new vision for the state’s 14 public universities, Governor Tom Wolf today celebrated the swearing-in of Dr. Daniel Greenstein as the fifth chancellor of Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education. Greenstein is a former leader with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the University of California system. “Dr. Greenstein comes to the State System at a time of tremendous challenge and tremendous opportunity,” said Governor Wolf. “I was proud to participate in the selection of Dan as the new chancellor and I welcome the opportunity to work with him on a new vision of our public universities. We need a strong state system that provides every student with an affordable education, so they can succeed in Pennsylvania.”The governor delivered remarks during the swearing-in ceremony at the Dixon University Center in Harrisburg. He was joined by PASSHE Board of Governors Chairwoman Cynthia Shapira and other members, representatives from the Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties, Pennsylvania Association of Councils of Trustees, officials from many state universities, and other higher education leaders.The commonwealth’s public universities serve nearly 100,000 students, of which 90 percent are Pennsylvania residents. The students study a wide array of fields, including STEM, health care, business and more.Greenstein previously led the Postsecondary Success strategy at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, helping other higher education leaders to raise educational-attainment levels and to promote economic mobility, Before joining the foundation, Greenstein was Vice Provost for Academic Planning and Programs for the University of California system. In that role, he oversaw system-wide academic planning and programs. center_img January 16, 2019last_img read more

Read More

Cigarettes are healthy! And if you believe that, you’ll fall for Big Dope’s marijuana propaganda, too

first_imgDaily Mail 17 February 2019Family First Comment: “Today’s Big Dope lobby wants to silence warnings about the dangers of marijuana until they have it legalised, and we can’t go back. They are like the Big Tobacco of the 1950s, a cynical greed campaign prepared to cause misery to others in the pursuit of riches.”#SayNopeToDopeRead more from our Briefing Booklet – http://saynopetodope.org.nz/big-tobacco-2/It is not all that long since people seriously tried to pretend that cigarettes were safe. Most of them were motivated by greed, and by fear that the truth would destroy their profits.Everyone now agrees that cigarettes cause lung cancer and many other diseases. But we forget the struggle that doctors and scientists had to fight, against Big Tobacco, to get this accepted.Sir Richard Doll and Sir Austin Bradford-Hill established in 1950 that there was a clear link between smoking and cancer. A wider study in 1954 absolutely confirmed this.Yet such was the power and wealth of the tobacco giants that it was decades before anything serious was done to discourage smoking. It was not until 1971 that the first feeble warning was placed on cigarette packets in this country.As late as 1962, the cigarette-makers were still pretending there hadn’t been enough research, and even that tobacco was good for you, claiming ‘smoking has pharmacological and psychological effects that are of real value to smokers’.A Tory MP, Ted Leather, denounced the doctors’ warnings as ‘unscientific tosh’ and ‘hysterical nonsense’. Lung cancer was blamed on air pollution. The prominent journalist Chapman Pincher proclaimed ‘cigarette risks are being exaggerated’. It was seriously argued that restrictions on smoking were an attack on liberty.I’d guess that many who made such claims lived to regret, bitterly and with some embarrassment, their part in covering up a terrible danger. Those who listened to them died, early and often horribly. They are still dying now, in cancer wards up and down the country.Earlier, firmer action would have saved them and their families from much grief. Those tobacco apologists all have their parallels now.I know, but will not name here, drug lobbyists, a Tory MP and several prominent journalists, who make the same excuses for marijuana, just as the evidence of its grave dangers piles up. They claim the evidence against it is exaggerated. They claim it has medical benefits. They claim its effects are caused by something else. May God forgive them. I cannot.Our society, learning nothing from the tobacco disaster, has for years been appallingly complacent about this terribly dangerous drug, whose effect on the brains and minds of its users can be utterly devastating. Knowledge of its dangers does not show up in statistics which pay little attention to the sort of damage it does.The victims of marijuana seldom die (though they increasingly frequently kill others, in mad car crashes and violent crime).School failure, delinquency, delusional behaviour, persecution mania, young lives wholly blighted and continued only thanks to a devastating cocktails of antipsychotic drugs, do not register much in NHS figures. Nor do the special miseries of the families of these people, compelled to care, for life, for a husk of the person they once knew and had hopes for, and still love. Such families keep their grief to themselves. But there are many of them.Look, I am right about this. But it is no good being right if you are not believed. I and my allies are roughly where the doctors who warned against lung cancer were in the mid-1950s. The evidence keeps on coming. Last week’s report linking marijuana use to depression and suicidal feelings among the young is just the latest in a great mountain of such studies. But the popular culture continues to act as if there’s nothing to worry about.It is now seven years since I published a book which pointed out the truth – that the police and courts have given up prosecuting the major crime of marijuana possession. Back in 2012 I was denounced, snubbed, sneered at and told by distinguished academics that I was wrong and that there was a stern regime of cruel prohibition.Now everybody recognises that what I said seven years ago is absolutely true. It is hard not to do so when so much of our country openly stinks of marijuana. Even if the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, Cressida Dick, cannot smell it, the rest of us can.Sooner than seven years from now, I suspect that the connection between marijuana and severe mental illness will also be widely understood and accepted. But will it be too late?Today’s Big Dope lobby wants to silence warnings about the dangers of marijuana until they have it legalised, and we can’t go back. They are like the Big Tobacco of the 1950s, a cynical greed campaign prepared to cause misery to others in the pursuit of riches.READ MORE: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-6713189/PETER-HITCHENS-Cigarettes-healthy-believe-youll-fall-Big-Dopes-propaganda.html?fbclid=IwAR2dbGKYCn6TAtZgoE0eQeTl5NzbIUgdpl_OsBX_eDhdjzk-TZ6in9wDuD8last_img read more

Read More